New partnership: Accuracy and Causality Link

Accuracy, an international advisory firm that brings its expertise to business leaders and decision-makers, and Causality Link, a financial information technology provider, today announced they have signed a partnership agreement to enrich certain areas of Accuracy’s strategic advisory services with the information produced by Causality Link’s platform.

Analysis of the Spanish banking sector

The Spanish banking sector continues to improve its results, and faces uncertainties regarding its resilience.

Macro scenario
Overcoming the shock of Covid – at least from an economic perspective – the Euro
area predicted a scenario of accelerated and prolonged growth. Improvements in the
supply chain, substantial household savings and a good tourism season supported
this thesis. However, the supply shock in key raw materials due to the Ukraine War
has pushed the CPI up to levels not foreseen last year (10.8% in Spain in July). The
projected baseline scenario suggests CPI rates above 4% in the Euro area until the
end of 2023, a negative impact on household consumption, and on GDP, which will
see less growth than had been expected in the coming quarters. […]


Download the full report below.

Accuracy Eco Podcast

Dans la continuité de son Economic Brief, Accuracy a le plaisir de vous présenter Accuracy Eco Podcast.
Retrouvez Hervé Goulletquer et David Chollet pour déchiffrer ensemble les dernières actualités économiques.
En 10 minutes, comprenez mieux le monde qui vous entoure et ses enjeux économiques.
Rendez-vous à la rentrée pour écouter notre tout premier épisode !

Accuracy Talks Straight #5 – Economic point of view

Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Advisor, Accuracy

Liberal revolution and reasonable evolution

The recent legislative elections in France highlighted once again the discontent of the electorate in numerous countries with the development of their environment. Almost 60% of French voters listed on the electoral register made their choice… not to choose (non-voters, blank votes and spoilt votes) and almost 40% of those who did cast a ballot did so in favour of political organisations (parties or alliances) that are traditionally anti-establishment (the Rassemblement National and the Nouvelle Union Populaire, Ecologique et Sociale).

If we take a short-term focus, finding the reasons for this mix of pessimism and ill-humour—confirmed as it happens by a stark contraction of household confidence—proves to be quite simple. The net acceleration of consumer prices and the war at the European Union’s border, both phenomena being inherently linked, are obvious reasons. These upheavals, the gravity of which should not be underestimated (as we shall see), combine and indeed amplify a general disquiet that has been solidly in
place for some time.

Without needlessly going too far back, we cannot fail to recognise that over the past 15 years the world has experienced an entire series of events that have contributed if not to a loss of our bearings, then to the questioning of the way we perceive the environment in which we are evolving.

Let us list some of these events, without looking to be exhaustive:

• the financial crisis (2008)

• the swing between the USA tending to retreat from global affairs and China, up to now, being more and more present (the new silk roads in 2015), with Europe in the middle trying to find itself (Brexit in 2016)

• the change in direction of US policy towards China (distrust and distance from 2017)

• Russia’s challenging of its neighbours’ borders (2008, 2014 and of course very recently in February this year)

• societies becoming more fragile (the Arab Spring in 2010–2011, the French Yellow Jackets in 2018, the assault on Congress in the USA in 2021, the Black Lives Matter movement in 2013, the refugee crisis in 2015, the Paris attacks in 2015)

• the rise of the environmental question (from the Fukushima accident in Japan in 2011 to a more complete realisation of climate change from 2018, with Greta Thunberg, among others)

• an economy that does not work for the benefit of all (the Panama Papers in 2016 on tax avoidance processes), against a contrasting backdrop of only passable, if not mediocre, performance at the macroeconomic scale but more dazzling performance at the microeconomic level (cf. GDP, and therefore revenues, vs the profits of listed companies)

• a pandemic crisis (COVID-19) highlighting the fragility of production chains that are too long and too complex (‘just in case’ taking over from ‘just in time’ but with what economic consequences?), not to mention the crisis linked to humanity’s abuse of Mother Nature

• the political and social question (the need to protect and share wealth)

It is on these already weakened foundations that the most recent events (inflation and the war, to put it simply) are being felt as potential vectors of rupture, similarly to potential catalysts of change that were until now latent. This rupture could take two forms.

First, and based on a deductive approach, there is the risk that geopolitical tectonic plates, to quote Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas, the new chief economist of the IMF, take shape, ‘fragmenting the global economy into distinct economic blocs with different ideologies, political systems, technology standards, cross border payment and trade systems, and reserve currencies’. The political landscape of the world would be drastically transformed, with the economic destabilisation that would result from it, at least in the beginning.

Then, and based on an empirical approach drawn from Applied History (the use of history to help benefit people in current and future times), there is the tempting parallel between the current situation and the situation that prevailed in the second half of the 1970s. At the time, the ingredients were episodes of war or regime change in the Middle East and a striking rise in oil prices. The consequence was twofold: the onset of spiralling inflation and a change of regulation, at the same time less interventionist and Keynesian and more liberal and ‘Friedmanian’: less systematic drive for budgetary activism, less regulation of the labour market, privatisation of public companies and more openness to external exchanges.

Let us delve into this second topic – or at least try. In the same way that correlation does not mean causation, parallel might mean trivial! By what path would comparable causes produce a change in the conduct of the economy, but in the opposite direction?

Is it not time to foresee a return to more voluntarist economic policies instead of prioritising laissez-faire economics? Yes, of course, but we must understand that this
aspiration derives more from a reaction to a general context considered dysfunctional rather than from the search for an appropriate response to the beginning of snowballing prices.

Public opinion (or those who influence it) seems to show dissatisfaction, with the source
of the problem behind it lying in the regulation in place today. This leads to an emphasis
on an attitude that favours the alternative to the current logic: goodbye Friedman and hello Keynes, nice to see you again!

Nevertheless, beyond the causalities and their occasional loose ends to be tied up, the aspiration for a change in the administrat ion of the economy remains. The keywords might be the following: energy transition and inclusion. That means cooperation between countries (yes to competition in an open world, but not to strategic rivalry); reconciliation between public decision-makers, but also private ones, and the various other actors of economic and social life (the stakeholding); and the return to a ‘normal’ redistribution of wealth from the most to the least privileged.

To paraphrase Harvard University Professor Dani Rodrik, a globalised economic system cannot be the end and the political and social balances of each country the means; the logic must be put in the right order (a return in a way to the spirit of Bretton Woods).

In this way, at least we can hope, the global economic system will not fragment and inflation will be contained.

At least in the West, citizens and political leaders should align their aspirations and their efforts in this quest. Will businesses follow them? Will they not have something to lose, at least the largest of them?

We must of course raise the difficulty that may exist in reconciling the economic globalisation experienced over the past 30 years or so and the values that now prevail in society.

This requires adaptation, but without opposing the behaviour of the past and the aspirations—most certainly lasting—that have emerged. In the future (far ahead!), there will be no economic success in a world made inhospitable by the climate or by politics.

It is possible to ‘make some money’ occasionally by optimising customer, supplier and employee relationships, but taking a more long-term view, a ‘functional’ planet and ‘calm’ societ y are prerequisites.

Maybe we too easily tend to oppose market logic head-on to state and societal logic. Doubtless, it is more a question of positioning the cursor in the right place based on the changes observed or foreseen. That is where we are today; it is more about evolution than revolution!

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #5 – The Academic Insight

Philippe Raimbourg
Director of the Ecole de Management de la Sorbonne (Université Panthéon-Sorbonne)
Affiliate professor at ESCP Business School

The dynamics of corporate credit spreads

The analysis of credit spread dynamics largely relates to the analysis of financial ratings and their impact on the quoted prices of debt securities.

This issue has been documented regularly for over 50 years and has led to numerous statistical studies. For the most part, these studies are consistent and highlight the different reactions of investors to cases of downgrading and upgrading. Observing the quoted prices of debt securities highlights the financial market’s expectation for downgrading, with quoted prices trending significantly downwards several trading days before the downgrade itself. On the agency’s announcement date, the market’s reactions are small in scale. By contrast, upgrades are hardly ever anticipated, with debt security holders particularly vigilant so as not to incur capital losses as a result of a downgrade. It is worth noting that because of the limited maturity of the debt securities, buying orders are structurally higher than selling orders; as a result, the latter are more easily seen as signals of mistrust by the market.

More recent studies have focused on the impact of rating changes on the volatility and liquidity of securities. Downgrades are preceded by an increase in volatility and a wider bid-ask spread, demonstrating a fall in liquidity; uncertainty as to the credit risk of the security in question leads to different reactions from investors and disparate valuations. Publishing the rating effectively homogenises investor perceptions, reduces volatility and increases liquidity. The effects are not so clear-cut when upgrading because, with the change to the rating being unanticipated, the effect of perception homogenisation is weaker and counterbalanced by the desire of some investors to profit from the improved credit quality to make speculative gains.

These studies shed new light on the question of the utility of rating agencies. The agencies effectively send information to investors, but perhaps not to all of them. Indeed, informed investors may outpace the agencies in the monitoring of the issuers’ credit quality. However, less informed investors need the opinion of the agency to be certain that the observed decrease in prices effectively corresponds to a downgrade in credit quality. The agency’s announcement removes all disparity of perception between investors and highlights the utility of the agency, which stabilises prices and increases liquidity. The dynamics of credit spreads cannot be studied separately from those of other marketable securities. After all, the debt world is not cut off from the equity world, something that we can easily understand through intuition alone. A fall in share prices is generally the result of operational difficulties leading to a reduction in operating cash flows and lower coverage of remuneration expenses and debt repayments. In parallel, this lower share value means an increase in financial leverage and, at a given volatility of the rate of return on assets, an increase in the volatility of the rate of return on equity. A reduction in the share price, an increase in financial leverage and a rise in the share price volatility and credit risk therefore all combine. From a theoretical point of view, Robert Merton was the first to express the credit spread as a function of the share price. We will not cover his work here. We will instead look into the credit-equity relationship as it is frequently used in the finance industry. Indeed, typically a power function denominated on growth rates is used for this purpose.

CDSt / CDSREF = [ SREF / St ] α

The credit spread growth rate, measured by the CDS, is therefore a function of the rate of decline of the share price modulo a power α that we assume to be positive, where REF serves as a basis for calculating the rate of change of the CDS and the share.

Knowledge of the parameter α makes it possible to specify this relationship fully. We first note that, as defined by the preceding equation, α is the opposite of the elasticity of the CDS value compared with the share value. By taking the logarithm of this equation, we get:

Ln [CDSt / CDSREF] = – α Ln [ St / SREF ]

α = – Ln [CDSt / CDSREF] / Ln [ St / SREF ]

A ratio of two relative growth rates, the α parameter is indeed, to the nearest sign, the elasticity of the CDS value compared with the share value that we can also write as:

α = – [S/CDS] [δCDS / δS]

By expressing the derivative of the CDS value in relation to the share value [δCDS / δS], we are led to the following value of the α parameter:

α = 1 + l avec l = D/(S+D)

The debt and equity worlds are therefore closely related: an inverse relationship links credit spreads and share prices; this relationship is heavily dependent on the financial structure of the company and its leverage calculated in relation to the balance sheet total (S+D). The higher this leverage, the more any potential underperformance in share price will lead to significant increases in the credit spread.

From an empirical perspective, though this correlation appears relatively low when the markets are calm, it is very high when the markets are volatile. When the leverage is low, the graph representing the development of credit spreads (in ordinates) in relation to share prices highlights a relatively linear relationship close to horizontal; however, when leverage is much higher, a highly convex line appears.

With this relationship established, we can now question the sense behind it, or, if we prefer, ask what the lead market is. To do so, it is necessary to undertake credit market and equity market co-integration tests, and that the arbitrageurs will be responsible for making the long-term equilibrium in these two markets consistent.

To this end, two series of econometric tests are conducted symmetrically. The first series aims to explain the changes in share prices by those in CDS, whether delayed or not by several periods, and vice versa as regards changes in the value of CDS, in the latter case incorporating changes in financial leverage. These relationships, tested over the period 2008–2020 for 220 listed securities on the S&P 500 index, bring to light the following results:

– There are information channels between the listed equity segment and the CDS market. These information channels concern all businesses, no matter their sector or their level of debt: ‘informed’ traders, because of the existence of financial leverage, make decisions just as much on the equity market as on the credit market.

– In the majority of cases (two thirds of companies reviewed), the lead market is the equity market whose developments determine around 70% of the developments in the CDS market.

– However, in the case of companies with significant leverage, the price discovery process starts with the CDS market, which explains more than 50% of price variations. This empirical work is evidence, if any were needed, of the importance of the structural credit risk model proposed by the Nobel laureate Robert Merton in 1974.

References

Lovo, S., Raimbourg Ph., Salvadè F. (2022), ‘Credit Rating Agencies, Information Asymmetry, and US Bond Liquidity’, Journal of Business, Finance and Accounting, https://doi. org/10.1111/jbfa.12610

Zimmermann, P. (2015), ‘Revisiting the Credit-Equity Power Relationship’, The Journal of Fixed Income, 24, 3, 77-87.

Zimmermann, P. (2021), ‘The Role of the Leverage Effect in the Price Discovery Process of Credit Markets’, Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, 122, 104033.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #5 – The Cultural Corner

Sophie Chassat
Philosopher, Partner at Wemean

Learning simplicity again

To stop seeing everything through the prism of complexity: that is without doubt the most difficult thing that we must learn to do again. It is the most difficult because the paradigm of ‘complex thought’ (Edgar Morin1) has taken over. Our everyday semantics is evidence enough of this: all is ‘systemic’, ‘hybrid’, holistic’ or ‘fluid’. No matter where we look, the ‘VUCA’ world (for volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous2) stretches as far as the eye can see.

Yet, applied to every situation, this complexity dogma actually makes us lose understanding, potential for action and responsibility. First, we lose understanding because it forces on us a baroque representation of the world where everything is entangled, where the part is in the whole but the whole is also in the part3, and where the causes of an event are indeterminable and subject to the retroactive effects of their own consequences4. Referring the search for truth to a reductive and mutilating approach to reality, it also encourages the equivalence of opinions and accentuates the shortcomings of the post-truth era5.

Second, we lose potential for action because from the moment everything becomes complex, how can we not be consumed with panic and paralysis? Where should we start if, as soon as we touch just one thread of the fabric of reality, the whole spool risks becoming even more entangled? Our inaction in the face of climate change derives in part from this representation of the problem as something of endless complexity and from the idea that the slightest attempt to do something about it would raise other issues that are even worse. The fable of the butterfly’s wings in Brazil that generates a hurricane at the other end of the world leads to our inertia and impuissance. Yet ‘the secret to action is to get started’6, as the philosopher Alain put it.

‘It’s complicated’ therefore becomes an excuse not to act. Whilst the state of the world requires us to commit to action now more than ever, today we are seeing a great disengagement, visible in both the civic and corporate worlds. Referring to effects of the system, the complexity dogma takes away individual responsibility. Learning to think, act and live with simplicity appears more urgent than ever. But the path is not easy. As the minimalist architect John Pawson put it: ‘Simplicity is actually very difficult to achieve. It depends on care, thought, knowledge and patience.’7 Let us add ‘courage’ to this list of ingredients, the courage to question a triumphant representation of reality that may well be one of our great contemporary ideologies.

____________

1 Published in 1990, the book Introduction à la pensée complexe [Introduction to complex
thought] by Edgar Morin presents the main principles of complex thought.

2 The acronym VUCA was created by the US army in the 1990s.

3 Edgar Morin call this idea the ‘holographic principle’.

4 This is what Morin calls the ‘recursive principle’.

5 This is a possible interpretation of another principle of complex thought, the ‘dialogical principle’.

6 Alain, translated from the French ‘Le secret de l’action, c’est de s’y mettre.’

7 The book Minimum by John Pawson was first published in 2006.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #5 – Industry insight

Justine Schmit
Senior Manager,
Accuracy

Is real estate at the peak of its cycle? The Paris example.

What should we think of the stability in Parisian residential property prices, despite the public health crisis?

Since March 2020, the Covid-19 pandemic has shaken up the global economy, bringing about changes in numerous sectors, including residential property, in particular.

This public health crisis is behind a change in economic paradigms that have been in place since the 2010s. The eurozone is currently facing a significant increase in inflation, which reached 5.2% in May 2022, a level unseen since 1985. Access to mortgages for individuals is gradually becoming more difficult.

However, despite this context and in contrast to previous crises, the price per square metre of existing housing in Paris has not experienced any significant decrease; in fact, it has remained relatively stable.

In this situation, two opposing theories have come to light: one the one hand, some consider that the consistent rise of existing housing prices in Paris is justified by its unique nature, the City of Lights, which shelters it from economic cycles; on the other hand, some worry about a property bubble in the capital that is on the verge of bursting.

WHAT DO THE FIGURES SAY?

According to the Parisian notary database, the price per square metre of existing housing rose from €3,463 to €10,760 between 1991 and April 2022, an increase of around 3.6% per annum on average. Inflation over the same period stood at around 1.8% per annum on average, according to Insee. In short, the value of a square metre in Paris grew on average twice as quickly as inflation. In the graph below, we can observe the curve representing the actual increase in property prices per square metre in Paris versus a curve representing the 1991 price per square metre subsequently inflated each year using the Insee inflation rate.

This graph highlights two observable phases:

• In the period from 1991 to 2004, the actual price per square metre remained below the 1991 Insee-inflated price. Property prices grew significantly in the period prior to 1991 then underwent a major correction of around 35% between 1991 and 1997. Only in 2004 did the actual Parisian property price curve exceed the Insee-inflated curve.

As a reminder, 1991 marked a high point in the cycle, completing an upward phase of speculation by property dealers in Paris, and the beginning of what certain experts would call ‘the property crisis of the century’.

• In the period from 2004 to 2022, the actual price per square metre grew massively, much more quickly than economic inflation: +5.0% per annum on average for the actual price versus only +1.8% for inflation. There is therefore major disparity between the development of residential property prices in Paris and the average increase in standard of living.

Moreover, it is worth noting that between 2020 and 2022, the price per square metre in Paris did not experience any major fluctuation, in contrast to previous crises (1991 or 2008).

The first quarter of 2022, however, sees the return of significant inflation, with no repercussions on the actual property prices at this stage.

Is this due to increasing demand?

Many defend the following theory: demand for Paris is growing, whilst supply is limited, which has resulted in the constant rise in prices per square metre, no matter what stage of the economic cycle is prevailing.

The demographic reality is not quite so categorical. In 1990, Paris had a population of 2.15 million; this grew to 2.19 million in 2020, with a peak of 2.24 million in 2010. Further, since 2021, the city’s population has been falling to reach 2.14 million in 2022. Indeed, some Parisians, finding the health restrictions rather trying, decided to leave inner Paris for the inner and outer suburbs or other regions of France altogether.

The trend to leave inner Paris can also be seen among the households that returned from London following Brexit.

This declining trend comes hand in hand with an increase in demographic pressure in the rest of the Ile-de-France region (excluding Paris). The departments in the inner and outer suburbs have seen their population grow from 8.5 million to 10.3 million people between 1990 and 2022.

Therefore, since 1990, Paris has experienced a relatively stable demographic dynamic, even starting to decline from 2021. We can conclude then that demand does not seem to be behind the significant rise in the actual prices of residential property in Paris.

Is this due to decreasing supply?

In Paris, transaction volumes are higher during periods of increased prices (between 35,000 and 40,000 transactions per annum), whilst these volumes fall significantly during periods of decreased prices (25,000 to 30,000 transactions).

It seems high time to put an end to a common misconception: a fall in the volume of properties for sale does not automatically increase prices.

The economic reality is different: when prices are high, property owners are more inclined to sell their property, either to crystallise a capital gain or to undertake a buy–sell transaction (incidentally, often in the reverse order) because they have confidence in the market. Conversely, when prices are shrinking, the market seizes up. Property owners delay as much as possible their potential sales waiting for better days.

This leads to the following conclusion: the classic economic mechanisms of supply and demand simply cannot explain the historical growth in residential property prices per square metre in Paris.

These price dynamics should really be considered as ‘contra-economic’: supply grows in volume when prices increase; supply falls in volume when prices decrease.

When concentrating our analysis on the recent public health crisis, we can observe that transaction volumes decreased in the Parisian market. Indeed, the residential property market in Paris experienced a dip from the first lockdown, falling from 35,100 transactions per annum to 31,200 in 2020 to return to 34,900 in 2021. This change can be explained in particular by the specific structure of the lockdown, with investors unable to complete the purchasing process for residential property (visits, meeting with the notary, move, etc.).

When the strict public health measures were lifted, the property market was able to recover quickly.

WHAT ARE THE CONSEQUENCES OF THE COVID-19 CRISIS ON THE RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY MARKET IN PARIS?

For some investors, the change to our way of life due to the public health measures – remote working and leaving Paris – was to lead to a fall in Parisian property prices, or even to a bursting of the property bubble comparable to that of 1991.

Marked by the successive lockdowns and discouraged by the more difficult conditions to obtain a mortgage, people could have started a mass exodus from Paris, resulting in a fall in residential property prices in the city.

We can see in the graph below that the public health crisis appears to have had little impact on the price per square metre in Paris. Prices have flattened, or slightly decreased, but have not fallen below the bar of €10,000 per square metre on average.

WHAT ARE THE REAL DRIVERS EXPLAINING THE INCREASE IN RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY PRICES PER SQUARE METRE IN PARIS?

As we cannot use demography and standard economics to explain the long-term increase in prices observed, what are the variables that really can explain this sharp increase?

To answer this question, we have built a multi-variable regression model using a long historical series (1990–2022), which comes to the following conclusion:

Since 1990, the development of residential property prices per square metre in Paris can be explained ‘entirely’ and ‘mathematically’ by two financial variables.

To put it simply, this means that it is possible to explain—and potentially predict—the price per square metre of residential property in Paris with an extremely high degree of accuracy using only two financial variables.

– For those familiar with such techniques, our multi-variable regression model reached a correlation index (R2 ) level of 94%1.

The first variable involved is the following:

– Variable 1: the spread between the French 10-year OAT rate and Insee’s inflation rate.

As shown in the graph below, taken in isolation, this variable

In simple terms, this variable represents a borrower’s interest rate adjusted for economic inflation, that is, the net real interest rate for the borrower.

This variable thus makes it possible to take into account the attractiveness of the resources available to the borrower to acquire a residential property.

The spread highlights the impact of French 10-year OAT rates in the development of property prices per square metre. Indeed, when the French 10-year OAT rates fall, the borrowing capacity of an individual borrower rises significantly. For example, if an individual borrower’s rate decreases by one point (100 basis points), his or her borrowing capacity increases by approximately 10%. But the Parisian property market incorporates this component in the development of prices per square metre. The fall in rates enables a rise in borrowing capacity for buyers but not in terms of the number of square metres that they can buy. The market absorbs any increase in borrowing capacity in the price per square metre.

Furthermore, this variable takes into account the effect of inflation on the property market. The year 2017 marks the beginning of a scissor effect between the French 10-year OAT rate and inflation. Interest rates remained stable whilst inflation picked up significantly. For the first time, the spread (10-year OAT – inflation) became negative, meaning that for the first time, individual borrowers could borrow at negative net real rates.

The scissor effect has intensified since 2018, bringing about the continued rise in residential property prices per square metre in Paris between 2018 and 2020.

But since 2021, the striking rise in inflation coupled with the stable low base rates have been behind a financially untenable spread. This spread has developed from (0.6)% in 2020 to (3.6)% in 2022. Over the same period, prices per square metre have started to decline just as the rise in the cost of living has accelerated.

The current intention of the European Central Bank (ECB) to increase base rates in order to curb inflation should gradually attenuate this historic scissor effect. But prices per square metre of residential property in Paris appear to have begun a noteworthy decline.

The fall in spread is not the only or even the best driver explaining the historical increase in prices per square metre in Paris.

The second historical variable is the following:

– Variable 2: the size of the ECB’s balance sheet.

– Taken in isolation, this variable explains the price per square metre with an R2 of approximately 94%. It itself is highly correlated with the first variable, owing to the coordination of decisions on the development of the ECB’s monetary policy for these two variables.

This variable highlights the consequences of the quantitative easing policy implemented by the ECB on the valuation of financial asset classes, including Parisian property.

To enable the members of the Eurogroup to face various economic crises (including the public health crisis), the ECB put in place in 2009 an ambitious quantitative easing policy, similarly to the Fed, with the aim of ensuring the stability of the euro by injecting a vast quantity of currency into the market.

The supply of this monetary mass to banks and the maintenance of low base rates are behind the historical rise of residential property prices in Paris.

Based on our analyses, it is possible to correlate the historical development of prices per square metre in Paris with the size of the ECB’s balance sheet at 94%.

The graph below presents the development of the ECB’s balance sheet, showing its consistent growth since 2009. This strong growth is the fruit of the implementation of unconventional monetary policies to respond to the crises felt by the Euro-system in 2009, 2011 and 2020. By massively acquiring public and private debt on the European market to serve the refinancing demands of banks, the ECB has created favourable financing conditions in the eurozone in a context of crisis and very low interest rates.

Since 2009, the ECB has implemented two ambitious net asset purchase programmes: the Asset Purchase Programme (APP) and the Pandemic Emergency Purchase Programme (PEPP). These programmes are behind an unprecedented increase in the size of the ECB’s balance sheet.

However, though we can observe another doubling of the ECB’s balance sheet between 2020 and 2022, the price per square metre of property in Paris has slightly fallen, compared with a considerable increase over the period from 2011 to 2021.

This is a major break in the trend.

CONCLUSION

Over the long-term historical period, we have observed that the development of prices per square metre in Paris is highly correlated with the monetary policy of the European regulator, in particular via two variables: the spread (10-year OAT – inflation) and the size of the ECB’s balance sheet.

Between 1999 and 2020, a mathematical formula makes it possible to predict with a high degree of relevance the development of prices per square metre in Paris. In short, it suffices to listen to the European Central Bank and to anticipate and model its decisions.

But the years 2021 and 2022 have been marked by a drastic change in macroeconomic indicators.

Inflation has returned to levels not experienced since the 1970s (5.2% in May 2022), which disrupts the spread rate.

Similarly, the ECB’s decision to put in place a massive debt purchasing plan in the context of the public health crisis led to the doubling of its monetary balance sheet, with no particular effect on the price per square metre in Paris.

The two variables that were the drivers of the rise in prices since 1999 can no longer explain the development of the price per square metre of residential property in Paris from 2020 onwards.

The model is broken.

This likely marks the beginning of a wait-andsee period that could lead to a fall in both volumes and prices per square metre (versus inflation).

What remains to be seen is how long the property investor of 2020 will have to endure this market correction and whether Parisian property will play its role of a safe haven investment as it did during the inflationist period of 1970.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #5 – Start-up stories

Romain Proglio
Partner, Accuracy

Rnest

Rnest is a piece of software that helps to resolve problems using internet data. Philippe Charlot, its founder, started with a simple fact: 90% of information useful for deci s ion-making i s avai l able on the internet. Yet finding the right information is particularly complicated: sources are innumerable, traditional searches refer to only a limited number of results and the time necessary to read, understand and summarise the web pages presents a significant obstacle. When faced with an issue, a user will typically ask a question on a major search engine (Google, Bing, Quant or Yahoo to name only the largest of them) or, for the more enlightened, on monitoring software (Quid, Palantir, Digimind or Amplyfi). These search engines and pieces of software search for keywords in web pages, on predefined sources and for almost zero productivity.

However, thanks to Rnest, the user can make a request for which the software will undertake a precise exploration of the internet in a URL, in hypertext or even in nearby text and will proceed to validate the pages visited precisely at phrase level (not just page level). This gives a result that is much more precise and relevant. Rnest is capable of exploring almost 250,000 web pages in a few hours. The software is also capable of proposing a problematised summary note in response to the initial request.

‘Find out what nobody knows yet, just with what you know’, Rnest promises. After formulating his or her question, no matter how complicated, the user initiates the search, and Rnest explores the web in real time to extract the most relevant content.

This artificial intelligence, made in France, navigates the web fully independently, is inspired by human behaviour and fulfils extremely varied needs across all sectors of activity. For example, based on the question ‘what are the innovation strategies of the top 200 French companies?’, Rnest will visit one million web pages, effectively saving the equivalent of 833 days of reading.

Among its first clients are BNP Paribas, Bouygues Télécom, Total, EDF and now Accuracy. Indeed, Accuracy will benefit from Rnest’s power in Open Source to enrich its advisory services to its clients.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #5 – One Partner, One View

Editorial

Jean-François Partiot
Partner, Accuracy

My pen must be wiser.

For this editorial in summer 2022, I would have liked nothing more than to wish you a lovely, light, magical summer.

Unfortunately, war has taken hold at Europe’s door, prices are exploding and the planet is suffocating.

My pen must be wiser.

Summer is a time to step back and reflect; let us take advantage of it to relearn…

– to relearn simplicity to find the taste for simple and efficient action again. The complexity dogma paralyses us; let us unburden ourselves of it! (The Cultural Corner with Sophie Chassat)

– to relearn to live together around the concept of the common good and aim for reasonable economic development in the long term. (Economic point of view with Hervé Goulletquer)

– to relearn to invest for the long term with limited resources, whether:

In technologies of the future:

• In Start-up Stories with Romain Proglio, you will discover Rnest, software that helps to resolve problems using the Web – how to dive into the depth and complexity of the Web to surface again with simple and understandable answers!

Via major corporate groups:

• In a context of the sudden rise in interest rates and tightening macroeconomic conditions, we must relearn the link between financing conditions and the financial structure of a group. The equity and debt markets are closely linked and their developments are interdependent, meaning that managers must carefully assess the cross-impacts of changes in their funding. (The Academic Insight with Philippe Raimbourg).

In real estate:
• Real estate is an asset class considered highly safe and predictable, particularly in population and activity pools as rich and dense as Greater Paris. But to what extent is this still true post-2020 after the unfolding of the public health crisis and the wave of capital injected into the economy at negative real interest rates? (Industry Insight with Justine Schmit and Nicolas Paillot de Montabert).

This summer, let us take inspiration from Erasmus and his humane wisdom.

‘It is the greatest of folly to wish to be wise in a world of madmen.’

‘The whole world is home to us all.’

So, let us be wise; let us be mad; but let us be respectful of one another and to the generations to come!

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #5

For our fifth edition of the Accuracy Talks Straight, Jean-François Partiot presents the editorial, before letting Romain Proglio introduce us to Rnest, a piece of software that helps to resolve problems using internet data. We then analyse the residential property prices in Paris with Nicolas Paillot de Montabert and Justine Schmit.
Sophie Chassat, Philosopher and partner at Wemean, explores how to learn simplicity. And finally, we look closer at the dynamics of corporate credit spreads with Philippe Raimbourg, Director of the Ecole de Management de la Sorbonne and Affiliate professor at ESCP Business School, as well as the liberal revolution with Hervé Goulletquer, our senior economic adviser.


SUMMARY


Editorial

Jean-François Partiot
Partner, Accuracy

My pen must be wiser.

For this editorial in summer 2022, I would have liked nothing more than to wish you a lovely, light, magical summer.

Unfortunately, war has taken hold at Europe’s door, prices are exploding and the planet is suffocating.

My pen must be wiser.

Summer is a time to step back and reflect; let us take advantage of it to relearn…

– to relearn simplicity to find the taste for simple and efficient action again. The complexity dogma paralyses us; let us unburden ourselves of it! (The Cultural Corner with Sophie Chassat)

– to relearn to live together around the concept of the common good and aim for reasonable economic development in the long term. (Economic point of view with Hervé Goulletquer)

– to relearn to invest for the long term with limited resources, whether:

In technologies of the future:

• In Start-up Stories with Romain Proglio, you will discover Rnest, software that helps to resolve problems using the Web – how to dive into the depth and complexity of the Web to surface again with simple and understandable answers!

Via major corporate groups:

• In a context of the sudden rise in interest rates and tightening macroeconomic conditions, we must relearn the link between financing conditions and the financial structure of a group. The equity and debt markets are closely linked and their developments are interdependent, meaning that managers must carefully assess the cross-impacts of changes in their funding. (The Academic Insight with Philippe Raimbourg).

In real estate:
• Real estate is an asset class considered highly safe and predictable, particularly in population and activity pools as rich and dense as Greater Paris. But to what extent is this still true post-2020 after the unfolding of the public health crisis and the wave of capital injected into the economy at negative real interest rates? (Industry Insight with Justine Schmit and Nicolas Paillot de Montabert).

This summer, let us take inspiration from Erasmus and his humane wisdom.

‘It is the greatest of folly to wish to be wise in a world of madmen.’

‘The whole world is home to us all.’

So, let us be wise; let us be mad; but let us be respectful of one another and to the generations to come!


Romain Proglio
Partner, Accuracy

Rnest

Rnest is a piece of software that helps to resolve problems using internet data. Philippe Charlot, its founder, started with a simple fact: 90% of information useful for deci s ion-making i s avai l able on the internet. Yet finding the right information is particularly complicated: sources are innumerable, traditional searches refer to only a limited number of results and the time necessary to read, understand and summarise the web pages presents a significant obstacle. When faced with an issue, a user will typically ask a question on a major search engine (Google, Bing, Quant or Yahoo to name only the largest of them) or, for the more enlightened, on monitoring software (Quid, Palantir, Digimind or Amplyfi). These search engines and pieces of software search for keywords in web pages, on predefined sources and for almost zero productivity.

However, thanks to Rnest, the user can make a request for which the software will undertake a precise exploration of the internet in a URL, in hypertext or even in nearby text and will proceed to validate the pages visited precisely at phrase level (not just page level). This gives a result that is much more precise and relevant. Rnest is capable of exploring almost 250,000 web pages in a few hours. The software is also capable of proposing a problematised summary note in response to the initial request.

‘Find out what nobody knows yet, just with what you know’, Rnest promises. After formulating his or her question, no matter how complicated, the user initiates the search, and Rnest explores the web in real time to extract the most relevant content.

This artificial intelligence, made in France, navigates the web fully independently, is inspired by human behaviour and fulfils extremely varied needs across all sectors of activity. For example, based on the question ‘what are the innovation strategies of the top 200 French companies?’, Rnest will visit one million web pages, effectively saving the equivalent of 833 days of reading.

Among its first clients are BNP Paribas, Bouygues Télécom, Total, EDF and now Accuracy. Indeed, Accuracy will benefit from Rnest’s power in Open Source to enrich its advisory services to its clients.


Justine Schmit
Senior Manager,
Accuracy

Is real estate at the peak of its cycle? The Paris example.

What should we think of the stability in Parisian residential property prices, despite the public health crisis?

Since March 2020, the Covid-19 pandemic has shaken up the global economy, bringing about changes in numerous sectors, including residential property, in particular.

This public health crisis is behind a change in economic paradigms that have been in place since the 2010s. The eurozone is currently facing a significant increase in inflation, which reached 5.2% in May 2022, a level unseen since 1985. Access to mortgages for individuals is gradually becoming more difficult.

However, despite this context and in contrast to previous crises, the price per square metre of existing housing in Paris has not experienced any significant decrease; in fact, it has remained relatively stable.

In this situation, two opposing theories have come to light: one the one hand, some consider that the consistent rise of existing housing prices in Paris is justified by its unique nature, the City of Lights, which shelters it from economic cycles; on the other hand, some worry about a property bubble in the capital that is on the verge of bursting.

WHAT DO THE FIGURES SAY?

According to the Parisian notary database, the price per square metre of existing housing rose from €3,463 to €10,760 between 1991 and April 2022, an increase of around 3.6% per annum on average. Inflation over the same period stood at around 1.8% per annum on average, according to Insee. In short, the value of a square metre in Paris grew on average twice as quickly as inflation. In the graph below, we can observe the curve representing the actual increase in property prices per square metre in Paris versus a curve representing the 1991 price per square metre subsequently inflated each year using the Insee inflation rate.

This graph highlights two observable phases:

• In the period from 1991 to 2004, the actual price per square metre remained below the 1991 Insee-inflated price. Property prices grew significantly in the period prior to 1991 then underwent a major correction of around 35% between 1991 and 1997. Only in 2004 did the actual Parisian property price curve exceed the Insee-inflated curve.

As a reminder, 1991 marked a high point in the cycle, completing an upward phase of speculation by property dealers in Paris, and the beginning of what certain experts would call ‘the property crisis of the century’.

• In the period from 2004 to 2022, the actual price per square metre grew massively, much more quickly than economic inflation: +5.0% per annum on average for the actual price versus only +1.8% for inflation. There is therefore major disparity between the development of residential property prices in Paris and the average increase in standard of living.

Moreover, it is worth noting that between 2020 and 2022, the price per square metre in Paris did not experience any major fluctuation, in contrast to previous crises (1991 or 2008).

The first quarter of 2022, however, sees the return of significant inflation, with no repercussions on the actual property prices at this stage.

Is this due to increasing demand?

Many defend the following theory: demand for Paris is growing, whilst supply is limited, which has resulted in the constant rise in prices per square metre, no matter what stage of the economic cycle is prevailing.

The demographic reality is not quite so categorical. In 1990, Paris had a population of 2.15 million; this grew to 2.19 million in 2020, with a peak of 2.24 million in 2010. Further, since 2021, the city’s population has been falling to reach 2.14 million in 2022. Indeed, some Parisians, finding the health restrictions rather trying, decided to leave inner Paris for the inner and outer suburbs or other regions of France altogether.

The trend to leave inner Paris can also be seen among the households that returned from London following Brexit.

This declining trend comes hand in hand with an increase in demographic pressure in the rest of the Ile-de-France region (excluding Paris). The departments in the inner and outer suburbs have seen their population grow from 8.5 million to 10.3 million people between 1990 and 2022.

Therefore, since 1990, Paris has experienced a relatively stable demographic dynamic, even starting to decline from 2021. We can conclude then that demand does not seem to be behind the significant rise in the actual prices of residential property in Paris.

Is this due to decreasing supply?

In Paris, transaction volumes are higher during periods of increased prices (between 35,000 and 40,000 transactions per annum), whilst these volumes fall significantly during periods of decreased prices (25,000 to 30,000 transactions).

It seems high time to put an end to a common misconception: a fall in the volume of properties for sale does not automatically increase prices.

The economic reality is different: when prices are high, property owners are more inclined to sell their property, either to crystallise a capital gain or to undertake a buy–sell transaction (incidentally, often in the reverse order) because they have confidence in the market. Conversely, when prices are shrinking, the market seizes up. Property owners delay as much as possible their potential sales waiting for better days.

This leads to the following conclusion: the classic economic mechanisms of supply and demand simply cannot explain the historical growth in residential property prices per square metre in Paris.

These price dynamics should really be considered as ‘contra-economic’: supply grows in volume when prices increase; supply falls in volume when prices decrease.

When concentrating our analysis on the recent public health crisis, we can observe that transaction volumes decreased in the Parisian market. Indeed, the residential property market in Paris experienced a dip from the first lockdown, falling from 35,100 transactions per annum to 31,200 in 2020 to return to 34,900 in 2021. This change can be explained in particular by the specific structure of the lockdown, with investors unable to complete the purchasing process for residential property (visits, meeting with the notary, move, etc.).

When the strict public health measures were lifted, the property market was able to recover quickly.

WHAT ARE THE CONSEQUENCES OF THE COVID-19 CRISIS ON THE RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY MARKET IN PARIS?

For some investors, the change to our way of life due to the public health measures – remote working and leaving Paris – was to lead to a fall in Parisian property prices, or even to a bursting of the property bubble comparable to that of 1991.

Marked by the successive lockdowns and discouraged by the more difficult conditions to obtain a mortgage, people could have started a mass exodus from Paris, resulting in a fall in residential property prices in the city.

We can see in the graph below that the public health crisis appears to have had little impact on the price per square metre in Paris. Prices have flattened, or slightly decreased, but have not fallen below the bar of €10,000 per square metre on average.

WHAT ARE THE REAL DRIVERS EXPLAINING THE INCREASE IN RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY PRICES PER SQUARE METRE IN PARIS?

As we cannot use demography and standard economics to explain the long-term increase in prices observed, what are the variables that really can explain this sharp increase?

To answer this question, we have built a multi-variable regression model using a long historical series (1990–2022), which comes to the following conclusion:

Since 1990, the development of residential property prices per square metre in Paris can be explained ‘entirely’ and ‘mathematically’ by two financial variables.

To put it simply, this means that it is possible to explain—and potentially predict—the price per square metre of residential property in Paris with an extremely high degree of accuracy using only two financial variables.

– For those familiar with such techniques, our multi-variable regression model reached a correlation index (R2 ) level of 94%1.

The first variable involved is the following:

– Variable 1: the spread between the French 10-year OAT rate and Insee’s inflation rate.

As shown in the graph below, taken in isolation, this variable

In simple terms, this variable represents a borrower’s interest rate adjusted for economic inflation, that is, the net real interest rate for the borrower.

This variable thus makes it possible to take into account the attractiveness of the resources available to the borrower to acquire a residential property.

The spread highlights the impact of French 10-year OAT rates in the development of property prices per square metre. Indeed, when the French 10-year OAT rates fall, the borrowing capacity of an individual borrower rises significantly. For example, if an individual borrower’s rate decreases by one point (100 basis points), his or her borrowing capacity increases by approximately 10%. But the Parisian property market incorporates this component in the development of prices per square metre. The fall in rates enables a rise in borrowing capacity for buyers but not in terms of the number of square metres that they can buy. The market absorbs any increase in borrowing capacity in the price per square metre.

Furthermore, this variable takes into account the effect of inflation on the property market. The year 2017 marks the beginning of a scissor effect between the French 10-year OAT rate and inflation. Interest rates remained stable whilst inflation picked up significantly. For the first time, the spread (10-year OAT – inflation) became negative, meaning that for the first time, individual borrowers could borrow at negative net real rates.

The scissor effect has intensified since 2018, bringing about the continued rise in residential property prices per square metre in Paris between 2018 and 2020.

But since 2021, the striking rise in inflation coupled with the stable low base rates have been behind a financially untenable spread. This spread has developed from (0.6)% in 2020 to (3.6)% in 2022. Over the same period, prices per square metre have started to decline just as the rise in the cost of living has accelerated.

The current intention of the European Central Bank (ECB) to increase base rates in order to curb inflation should gradually attenuate this historic scissor effect. But prices per square metre of residential property in Paris appear to have begun a noteworthy decline.

The fall in spread is not the only or even the best driver explaining the historical increase in prices per square metre in Paris.

The second historical variable is the following:

– Variable 2: the size of the ECB’s balance sheet.

– Taken in isolation, this variable explains the price per square metre with an R2 of approximately 94%. It itself is highly correlated with the first variable, owing to the coordination of decisions on the development of the ECB’s monetary policy for these two variables.

This variable highlights the consequences of the quantitative easing policy implemented by the ECB on the valuation of financial asset classes, including Parisian property.

To enable the members of the Eurogroup to face various economic crises (including the public health crisis), the ECB put in place in 2009 an ambitious quantitative easing policy, similarly to the Fed, with the aim of ensuring the stability of the euro by injecting a vast quantity of currency into the market.

The supply of this monetary mass to banks and the maintenance of low base rates are behind the historical rise of residential property prices in Paris.

Based on our analyses, it is possible to correlate the historical development of prices per square metre in Paris with the size of the ECB’s balance sheet at 94%.

The graph below presents the development of the ECB’s balance sheet, showing its consistent growth since 2009. This strong growth is the fruit of the implementation of unconventional monetary policies to respond to the crises felt by the Euro-system in 2009, 2011 and 2020. By massively acquiring public and private debt on the European market to serve the refinancing demands of banks, the ECB has created favourable financing conditions in the eurozone in a context of crisis and very low interest rates.

Since 2009, the ECB has implemented two ambitious net asset purchase programmes: the Asset Purchase Programme (APP) and the Pandemic Emergency Purchase Programme (PEPP). These programmes are behind an unprecedented increase in the size of the ECB’s balance sheet.

However, though we can observe another doubling of the ECB’s balance sheet between 2020 and 2022, the price per square metre of property in Paris has slightly fallen, compared with a considerable increase over the period from 2011 to 2021.

This is a major break in the trend.

CONCLUSION

Over the long-term historical period, we have observed that the development of prices per square metre in Paris is highly correlated with the monetary policy of the European regulator, in particular via two variables: the spread (10-year OAT – inflation) and the size of the ECB’s balance sheet.

Between 1999 and 2020, a mathematical formula makes it possible to predict with a high degree of relevance the development of prices per square metre in Paris. In short, it suffices to listen to the European Central Bank and to anticipate and model its decisions.

But the years 2021 and 2022 have been marked by a drastic change in macroeconomic indicators.

Inflation has returned to levels not experienced since the 1970s (5.2% in May 2022), which disrupts the spread rate.

Similarly, the ECB’s decision to put in place a massive debt purchasing plan in the context of the public health crisis led to the doubling of its monetary balance sheet, with no particular effect on the price per square metre in Paris.

The two variables that were the drivers of the rise in prices since 1999 can no longer explain the development of the price per square metre of residential property in Paris from 2020 onwards.

The model is broken.

This likely marks the beginning of a wait-andsee period that could lead to a fall in both volumes and prices per square metre (versus inflation).

What remains to be seen is how long the property investor of 2020 will have to endure this market correction and whether Parisian property will play its role of a safe haven investment as it did during the inflationist period of 1970.


Sophie Chassat
Philosopher, Partner at Wemean

Learning simplicity again

To stop seeing everything through the prism of complexity: that is without doubt the most difficult thing that we must learn to do again. It is the most difficult because the paradigm of ‘complex thought’ (Edgar Morin1) has taken over. Our everyday semantics is evidence enough of this: all is ‘systemic’, ‘hybrid’, holistic’ or ‘fluid’. No matter where we look, the ‘VUCA’ world (for volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous2) stretches as far as the eye can see.

Yet, applied to every situation, this complexity dogma actually makes us lose understanding, potential for action and responsibility. First, we lose understanding because it forces on us a baroque representation of the world where everything is entangled, where the part is in the whole but the whole is also in the part3, and where the causes of an event are indeterminable and subject to the retroactive effects of their own consequences4. Referring the search for truth to a reductive and mutilating approach to reality, it also encourages the equivalence of opinions and accentuates the shortcomings of the post-truth era5.

Second, we lose potential for action because from the moment everything becomes complex, how can we not be consumed with panic and paralysis? Where should we start if, as soon as we touch just one thread of the fabric of reality, the whole spool risks becoming even more entangled? Our inaction in the face of climate change derives in part from this representation of the problem as something of endless complexity and from the idea that the slightest attempt to do something about it would raise other issues that are even worse. The fable of the butterfly’s wings in Brazil that generates a hurricane at the other end of the world leads to our inertia and impuissance. Yet ‘the secret to action is to get started’6, as the philosopher Alain put it.

‘It’s complicated’ therefore becomes an excuse not to act. Whilst the state of the world requires us to commit to action now more than ever, today we are seeing a great disengagement, visible in both the civic and corporate worlds. Referring to effects of the system, the complexity dogma takes away individual responsibility. Learning to think, act and live with simplicity appears more urgent than ever. But the path is not easy. As the minimalist architect John Pawson put it: ‘Simplicity is actually very difficult to achieve. It depends on care, thought, knowledge and patience.’7 Let us add ‘courage’ to this list of ingredients, the courage to question a triumphant representation of reality that may well be one of our great contemporary ideologies.

____________

1 Published in 1990, the book Introduction à la pensée complexe [Introduction to complex
thought] by Edgar Morin presents the main principles of complex thought.

2 The acronym VUCA was created by the US army in the 1990s.

3 Edgar Morin call this idea the ‘holographic principle’.

4 This is what Morin calls the ‘recursive principle’.

5 This is a possible interpretation of another principle of complex thought, the ‘dialogical principle’.

6 Alain, translated from the French ‘Le secret de l’action, c’est de s’y mettre.’

7 The book Minimum by John Pawson was first published in 2006.


Philippe Raimbourg
Director of the Ecole de Management de la Sorbonne (Université Panthéon-Sorbonne)
Affiliate professor at ESCP Business School

La dynamique des spreads de credit corporate

The analysis of credit spread dynamics largely relates to
the analysis of financial ratings and their impact on the
quoted prices of debt securities.

This issue has been documented regularly for over 50 years and has led to numerous statistical studies. For the most part, these studies are consistent and highlight the different reactions of investors to cases of downgrading and upgrading. Observing the quoted prices of debt securities highlights the financial market’s expectation for downgrading, with quoted prices trending significantly downwards several trading days before the downgrade itself. On the agency’s announcement date, the market’s reactions are small in scale. By contrast, upgrades are hardly ever anticipated, with debt security holders particularly vigilant so as not to incur capital losses as a result of a downgrade. It is worth noting that because of the limited maturity of the debt securities, buying orders are structurally higher than selling orders; as a result, the latter are more easily seen as signals of mistrust by the market.

More recent studies have focused on the impact of rating changes on the volatility and liquidity of securities. Downgrades are preceded by an increase in volatility and a wider bid-ask spread, demonstrating a fall in liquidity; uncertainty as to the credit risk of the security in question leads to different reactions from investors and disparate valuations. Publishing the rating effectively homogenises investor perceptions, reduces volatility and increases liquidity. The effects are not so clear-cut when upgrading because, with the change to the rating being unanticipated, the effect of perception homogenisation is weaker and counterbalanced by the desire of some investors to profit from the improved credit quality to make speculative gains.

These studies shed new light on the question of the utility of rating agencies. The agencies effectively send information to investors, but perhaps not to all of them. Indeed, informed investors may outpace the agencies in the monitoring of the issuers’ credit quality. However, less informed investors need the opinion of the agency to be certain that the observed decrease in prices effectively corresponds to a downgrade in credit quality. The agency’s announcement removes all disparity of perception between investors and highlights the utility of the agency, which stabilises prices and increases liquidity. The dynamics of credit spreads cannot be studied separately from those of other marketable securities. After all, the debt world is not cut off from the equity world, something that we can easily understand through intuition alone. A fall in share prices is generally the result of operational difficulties leading to a reduction in operating cash flows and lower coverage of remuneration expenses and debt repayments. In parallel, this lower share value means an increase in financial leverage and, at a given volatility of the rate of return on assets, an increase in the volatility of the rate of return on equity. A reduction in the share price, an increase in financial leverage and a rise in the share price volatility and credit risk therefore all combine. From a theoretical point of view, Robert Merton was the first to express the credit spread as a function of the share price. We will not cover his work here. We will instead look into the credit-equity relationship as it is frequently used in the finance industry. Indeed, typically a power function denominated on growth rates is used for this purpose.

CDSt / CDSREF = [ SREF / St ] α

The credit spread growth rate, measured by the CDS, is therefore a function of the rate of decline of the share price modulo a power α that we assume to be positive, where REF serves as a basis for calculating the rate of change of the CDS and the share.

Knowledge of the parameter α makes it possible to specify this relationship fully. We first note that, as defined by the preceding equation, α is the opposite of the elasticity of the CDS value compared with the share value. By taking the logarithm of this equation, we get:

Ln [CDSt / CDSREF] = – α Ln [ St / SREF ]

α = – Ln [CDSt / CDSREF] / Ln [ St / SREF ]

A ratio of two relative growth rates, the α parameter is indeed, to the nearest sign, the elasticity of the CDS value compared with the share value that we can also write as:

α = – [S/CDS] [δCDS / δS]

By expressing the derivative of the CDS value in relation to the share value [δCDS / δS], we are led to the following value of the α parameter:

α = 1 + l avec l = D/(S+D)

The debt and equity worlds are therefore closely related: an inverse relationship links credit spreads and share prices; this relationship is heavily dependent on the financial structure of the company and its leverage calculated in relation to the balance sheet total (S+D). The higher this leverage, the more any potential underperformance in share price will lead to significant increases in the credit spread.

From an empirical perspective, though this correlation appears relatively low when the markets are calm, it is very high when the markets are volatile. When the leverage is low, the graph representing the development of credit spreads (in ordinates) in relation to share prices highlights a relatively linear relationship close to horizontal; however, when leverage is much higher, a highly convex line appears.

With this relationship established, we can now question the sense behind it, or, if we prefer, ask what the lead market is. To do so, it is necessary to undertake credit market and equity market co-integration tests, and that the arbitrageurs will be responsible for making the long-term equilibrium in these two markets consistent.

To this end, two series of econometric tests are conducted symmetrically. The first series aims to explain the changes in share prices by those in CDS, whether delayed or not by several periods, and vice versa as regards changes in the value of CDS, in the latter case incorporating changes in financial leverage. These relationships, tested over the period 2008–2020 for 220 listed securities on the S&P 500 index, bring to light the following results:

– There are information channels between the listed equity segment and the CDS market. These information channels concern all businesses, no matter their sector or their level of debt: ‘informed’ traders, because of the existence of financial leverage, make decisions just as much on the equity market as on the credit market.

– In the majority of cases (two thirds of companies reviewed), the lead market is the equity market whose developments determine around 70% of the developments in the CDS market.

– However, in the case of companies with significant leverage, the price discovery process starts with the CDS market, which explains more than 50% of price variations. This empirical work is evidence, if any were needed, of the importance of the structural credit risk model proposed by the Nobel laureate Robert Merton in 1974.

References

Lovo, S., Raimbourg Ph., Salvadè F. (2022), ‘Credit Rating Agencies, Information Asymmetry, and US Bond Liquidity’, Journal of Business, Finance and Accounting, https://doi. org/10.1111/jbfa.12610

Zimmermann, P. (2015), ‘Revisiting the Credit-Equity Power Relationship’, The Journal of Fixed Income, 24, 3, 77-87.

Zimmermann, P. (2021), ‘The Role of the Leverage Effect in the Price Discovery Process of Credit Markets’, Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, 122, 104033.


Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Advisor, Accuracy

Révolution libérale et évolution raisonnable

The recent legislative elections in France highlighted once again the discontent of the electorate in numerous countries with the development of their environment. Almost 60% of French voters listed on the electoral register made their choice… not to choose (non-voters, blank votes and spoilt votes) and almost 40% of those who did cast a ballot did so in favour of political organisations (parties or alliances) that are traditionally anti-establishment (the Rassemblement National and the Nouvelle Union Populaire, Ecologique et Sociale).

If we take a short-term focus, finding the reasons for this mix of pessimism and ill-humour—confirmed as it happens by a stark contraction of household confidence—proves to be quite simple. The net acceleration of consumer prices and the war at the European Union’s border, both phenomena being inherently linked, are obvious reasons. These upheavals, the gravity of which should not be underestimated (as we shall see), combine and indeed amplify a general disquiet that has been solidly in
place for some time.

Without needlessly going too far back, we cannot fail to recognise that over the past 15 years the world has experienced an entire series of events that have contributed if not to a loss of our bearings, then to the questioning of the way we perceive the environment in which we are evolving.

Let us list some of these events, without looking to be exhaustive:

• the financial crisis (2008)

• the swing between the USA tending to retreat from global affairs and China, up to now, being more and more present (the new silk roads in 2015), with Europe in the middle trying to find itself (Brexit in 2016)

• the change in direction of US policy towards China (distrust and distance from 2017)

• Russia’s challenging of its neighbours’ borders (2008, 2014 and of course very recently in February this year)

• societies becoming more fragile (the Arab Spring in 2010–2011, the French Yellow Jackets in 2018, the assault on Congress in the USA in 2021, the Black Lives Matter movement in 2013, the refugee crisis in 2015, the Paris attacks in 2015)

• the rise of the environmental question (from the Fukushima accident in Japan in 2011 to a more complete realisation of climate change from 2018, with Greta Thunberg, among others)

• an economy that does not work for the benefit of all (the Panama Papers in 2016 on tax avoidance processes), against a contrasting backdrop of only passable, if not mediocre, performance at the macroeconomic scale but more dazzling performance at the microeconomic level (cf. GDP, and therefore revenues, vs the profits of listed companies)

• a pandemic crisis (COVID-19) highlighting the fragility of production chains that are too long and too complex (‘just in case’ taking over from ‘just in time’ but with what economic consequences?), not to mention the crisis linked to humanity’s abuse of Mother Nature

• the political and social question (the need to protect and share wealth)

It is on these already weakened foundations that the most recent events (inflation and the war, to put it simply) are being felt as potential vectors of rupture, similarly to potential catalysts of change that were until now latent. This rupture could take two forms.

First, and based on a deductive approach, there is the risk that geopolitical tectonic plates, to quote Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas, the new chief economist of the IMF, take shape, ‘fragmenting the global economy into distinct economic blocs with different ideologies, political systems, technology standards, cross border payment and trade systems, and reserve currencies’. The political landscape of the world would be drastically transformed, with the economic destabilisation that would result from it, at least in the beginning.

Then, and based on an empirical approach drawn from Applied History (the use of history to help benefit people in current and future times), there is the tempting parallel between the current situation and the situation that prevailed in the second half of the 1970s. At the time, the ingredients were episodes of war or regime change in the Middle East and a striking rise in oil prices. The consequence was twofold: the onset of spiralling inflation and a change of regulation, at the same time less interventionist and Keynesian and more liberal and ‘Friedmanian’: less systematic drive for budgetary activism, less regulation of the labour market, privatisation of public companies and more openness to external exchanges.

Let us delve into this second topic – or at least try. In the same way that correlation does not mean causation, parallel might mean trivial! By what path would comparable causes produce a change in the conduct of the economy, but in the opposite direction?

Is it not time to foresee a return to more voluntarist economic policies instead of prioritising laissez-faire economics? Yes, of course, but we must understand that this
aspiration derives more from a reaction to a general context considered dysfunctional rather than from the search for an appropriate response to the beginning of snowballing prices.

Public opinion (or those who influence it) seems to show dissatisfaction, with the source
of the problem behind it lying in the regulation in place today. This leads to an emphasis
on an attitude that favours the alternative to the current logic: goodbye Friedman and hello Keynes, nice to see you again!

Nevertheless, beyond the causalities and their occasional loose ends to be tied up, the aspiration for a change in the administrat ion of the economy remains. The keywords might be the following: energy transition and inclusion. That means cooperation between countries (yes to competition in an open world, but not to strategic rivalry); reconciliation between public decision-makers, but also private ones, and the various other actors of economic and social life (the stakeholding); and the return to a ‘normal’ redistribution of wealth from the most to the least privileged.

To paraphrase Harvard University Professor Dani Rodrik, a globalised economic system cannot be the end and the political and social balances of each country the means; the logic must be put in the right order (a return in a way to the spirit of Bretton Woods).

In this way, at least we can hope, the global economic system will not fragment and inflation will be contained.

At least in the West, citizens and political leaders should align their aspirations and their efforts in this quest. Will businesses follow them? Will they not have something to lose, at least the largest of them?

We must of course raise the difficulty that may exist in reconciling the economic globalisation experienced over the past 30 years or so and the values that now prevail in society.

This requires adaptation, but without opposing the behaviour of the past and the aspirations—most certainly lasting—that have emerged. In the future (far ahead!), there will be no economic success in a world made inhospitable by the climate or by politics.

It is possible to ‘make some money’ occasionally by optimising customer, supplier and employee relationships, but taking a more long-term view, a ‘functional’ planet and ‘calm’ societ y are prerequisites.

Maybe we too easily tend to oppose market logic head-on to state and societal logic. Doubtless, it is more a question of positioning the cursor in the right place based on the changes observed or foreseen. That is where we are today; it is more about evolution than revolution!


Read the fourth edition of Accuracy Talks Straight >

Five Accuracy experts recognised as Thought Leaders in the Who’s Who Legal: Arbitration Expert Witnesses 2022

Accuracy is pleased to announce that five of its experts have been listed as Thought Leaders in Who’s Who Legal’s Arbitration Expert Witnesses 2022 edition.

Through nominations from peers and clients, the following Accuracy experts have been recognised as the leading names in the field:

Nicolas Barsalou
Nicolas Bourdon
Laura Cózar
Hervé de Trogoff
Erik van Duijvenvoorde

Who’s Who Legal identifies the foremost legal practitioners and consulting experts in business law based upon comprehensive, independent research. Entry into their guides is based solely on merit.


Accuracy’s forensic, litigation and arbitration experts combine technical skills in corporate finance, accounting, financial modelling, economics and market analysis with many years of forensic and transaction experience. We participate in different forms of dispute resolution, including arbitration, litigation and mediation. We also frequently assist in cases of actual or suspected fraud. Our expert teams operate on the following basis:

• An in-depth assessment of the situation;
• An approach which values a transparent, detailed and well-argued presentation of the economic, financial or accounting issues at the heart of the case;
• The work is carried out objectively with the intention to make it easier for the arbitrators to reach a decision;
• Clear, robust written expert reports, including concise summaries and detailed backup;
• A proven ability to present and defend our conclusions orally.

Our approach provides for a more comprehensive and richer response to the numerous challenges of a dispute. Additionally, our team includes delay and quantum experts, able to assess time related costs and quantify financial damages related to dispute cases on major construction projects.

« Accuracay poursuit sa stratégie de croissance raisonnée »

Le cabinet de conseil financier ACCURACY accélère sa stratégie de croissance et annonce la reprise des activités d’Associés en Finance, acteur de référence de l’évaluation financière.

Avec cette acquisition, Accuracy conforte sa position de leader sur le marché de l’évaluation financière, complète son expertise et renforce ses équipes sur de nombreux sujets comme les attestations d’équité, l’évaluation d’entreprise dans des contextes variés ou encore l’évaluation d’instruments financiers.

Inflation – What does the future hold?

In this final edition of the Economic Brief before the summer break, we will zoom in on inflation and consider how the current situation might unfold. As we have seen in past editions, inflation is now at levels unseen since the 1970s, with numerous contributing factors, from the geopolitical to the macroeconomic. But just where is inflation heading?

Accuracy Talks Straight #5 – Regard sur l’économie

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 06.-Regard-sur-léconomie-1024x153.png

Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Advisor, Accuracy

Révolution libérale et évolution raisonnable

La récente élection législative française envoie un nouveau message sur le mécontentement des citoyens électeurs dans nombre de pays, concernant l’évolution de leur environnement. Presque 60% des Français inscrits sur les listes électorales ont fait le choix… de ne pas choisir (abstentions et votes blancs ou nuls) et près de 40% de ceux qui ont exprimé une préférence partisane l’ont fait en faveur d’organisations (partis ou réunion de partis) de tradition plutôt contestataire (Le Rassemblement National et la Nouvelle Union Populaire, Ecologique et Sociale).

Si on prend une focale courte, trouver les raisons de ce mélange de pessimisme et de mauvaise humeur, confirmé au demeurant par un repli marqué de la confiance des ménages, n’est pas très compliqué.

La nette accélération des prix et la guerre à la frontière de l’Union Européenne, les deux phénomènes n’étant pas indépendants, en sont les raisons évidentes. Ces bouleversements, dont la gravité n’est pas du tout à minorer (nous allons le voir), s’ajoutent et en fait amplifient un mal-être solidement en place depuis déjà longtemps. Sans remonter inutilement loin en arrière, comment ne pas reconnaître que le monde a enregistré au cours des quinze dernières années toute une série d’évènements qui participent, si ce n’est d’une perte de repères, d’une remise en cause de la façon de percevoir l’environnement dans lequel chacun évolue ? Dressons en une liste, sans forcément chercher à être exhaustif :

• la crise financière (2008),

• le balancement entre des Etats-Unis plutôt en retrait des affaires du monde et une Chine jusqu’à maintenant de plus en plus présente (les nouvelles routes de la soie en 2015) et au milieu une Europe qui se cherche (le Brexit en 2016),

• la réorientation de la politique américaine vis-à-vis de la Chine (méfiance et prise de distance à partir de 2017),

• la remise en cause des frontières de ses voisins par la Russie (2008, 2014 et donc et très récemment en février de cette année),

• la fragilisation des Sociétés (des printemps arabes en 2010 – 2011 aux gilets jaunes français en 2018 et à l’assaut sur le Congrès des Etats-Unis en 2021 ; des mouvement
Black Lives Matter – 2013 – à la crise des réfugiés – 2015 – et aux attentats de Paris – 2015 –),

• la montée de la question environnementale (de l’accident de Fukushima au Japon en 2011 à une prise de conscience plus entière du réchauffement climatique à partir
de 2018, entre autres avec Greta Thunberg),

• une économie qui ne fonctionne pas au bénéfice de tous (les Panama papers en 2016 sur les processus d’évitement de l’impôt), sur fond justement de contraste entre des performances macroéconomiques passables, voire médiocres, et microéconomiques plus étincelantes – cf. PIB, et donc revenus, vs profits des entreprises cotées –),

• une crise épidémique mondiale (la COVID 19) qui pointe la fragilité de chaines de production trop longues et trop complexes (le just in case qui supplanterait le just in time ; avec quelles conséquences économiques ?) et encore plus celle de l’espèce humaine qui aurait abusé de trop de « mère nature »,

• in fine, la question politique et sociale (besoin de protection et partage des richesses) s’impose progressivement dans le débat électoral.

C’est sur ces soubassements déjà fragilisés que les évènements les plus récents (l’inflation et la guerre, pour faire simple) sont ressentis comme des vecteurs possibles de rupture ; un peu comme des catalyseurs éventuels de changements jusqu’alors davantage latents. Cette rupture pourrait être de deux ordres. D’abord et selon une démarche déductive, il y a le risque qu’une sorte de tectonique des plaques, pour reprendre l’expression de Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas, le nouveau Chef-économiste du FMI, se mette en place, « fragmentant le système économique mondial, en blocs distincts, chacun avec sa propre idéologie, son propre système politique, ses propres standards technologiques, ses propres systèmes commerciaux et de paiement et sa propre monnaie de réserve ».

La géographie politique du monde serait profondément transformée, avec la déstabilisation économique qui, au moins dans un premier temps, en découlerait. Ensuite et en fonction d’une approche empirique tirée de l’histoire appliquée (l’Applied History, selon l’expression du monde académique anglo-saxon), il y a ce parallèle qu’il est peut-être tentant de faire entre la situation actuelle et celle ayant prévalu à partir de la seconde moitié des années 70. A l’époque, les ingrédients sont des épisodes de guerre ou de changement de régime au Moyen-Orient et un fort renchérissement des cours du pétrole. La conséquence est double : l’enclenchement d’une spirale inflationniste et un changement de « régulation », à la fois moins interventionniste et keynésienne et plus libérale et « friedmaniènne » : moins d’allant systématique pour l’activisme budgétaire, allègement des réglementations du marché du travail, privatisation d’entreprises publiques et plus grande ouverture aux échanges extérieurs.

Creusons ce deuxième sujet ; au moins essayons. En gardant à l’esprit que, au même titre que corrélation n’est pas raison, parallèle peut être bagatelle ! Par quel cheminement, des causes comparables produiraient certes un changement dans la conduite de l’économie, mais de direction opposée ? N’est-il pas dans l’air du temps de pronostiquer le retour à des politiques économiques plus volontaristes et faisant moins la part belle au « laisser-faire » ? Oui, bien sûr ; mais il faut comprendre que cette aspiration tient plus de la réaction à un cadre général considéré comme dysfonctionnel que de la recherche d’une réponse adaptée à un début d’emballement des prix.

Les opinions publiques (ou ceux qui les influencent) expriment une insatisfaction et considèrent que l’origine du problème à la genèse de celle-ci est à rechercher dans la régulation en cours aujourd’hui. Avec alors la mise en avant d’une attitude qui consiste à plébisciter l’alternative à la logique en cours : adieu Friedman et content de te revoir Keynes !

Il n’empêche que, au-delà de causalités pas toujours bien « ficelées », l’aspiration à un changement d’administration de l’économie demeure. Les maîtres-mots en seraient les suivants : transition énergétique et inclusion. Ce qui signifie : coopération entre pays (oui à la concurrence au sein d’un monde ouvert, mais non à la rivalité stratégique), rapprochement entre les décideurs publics, mais aussi privés, et les différents autres acteurs de la vie économique et sociale (le stakeholding) et retour à une redistribution « normale » des milieux les plus favorisés vers ceux les plus modestes. Pour reprendre les mots de Dani Rodrik, professeur à l’université d’Harvard, « un système économique mondialisé ne peut pas être la fin et les équilibres politiques et sociaux propres à chaque pays, un moyen ; il faut remettre la logique dans le bon sens (revenir en quelque sorte à l’esprit de Bretton Woods) ».

Ainsi, au moins peut-on l’espérer, la « fragmentation du système économique mondial » n’aurait pas lieu et l’inflation serait contenue. Au moins en Occident, l’essentiel des citoyens et des responsables politiques devrait aligner leurs aspirations et leurs efforts dans cette quête. Les entreprises suivraient-elles ? N’ont-elles pas à y perdre, au moins pour les plus grandes d’entre-elles ?

On doit évidemment soulever la difficulté qui peut exister entre la pratique de la mondialisation économique vécue au cours des quelque trente dernières années et les valeurs qui s’imposent maintenant dans la Société. Cela nécessite une adaptation ; mais sans qu’il faille opposer le comportement d’autrefois aux aspirations, très certainement durables, qui sont apparues. En regardant devant (loin devant !), il n’y aura pas de réussite économique dans un monde devenu invivable à cause du climat ou de la politique.

Il est possible ponctuellement de « faire plus d’argent » en optimisant les relations avec les clients, les fournisseurs et les employés ; dans une perspective plus longue, une planète « fonctionnelle » et une Société « apaisée » sont des prérequis qui s’imposent. Peut-être a-t-on trop facilement tendance à opposer frontalement logique de marché aux logiques étatique et sociétale. Sans doute est-il davantage question de positionner au bon endroit le curseur en fonction des changements observés ou pressentis On en est là aujourd’hui et il s’agit bien plus d’évolution que de révolution !

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #5 – L’angle académique


This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 05.-Langle-académique-1024x153.png

Philippe Raimbourg
Directeur de l’Ecole de Management de la Sorbonne (Université Panthéon-Sorbonne)
Professeur affilié à ESCP Business School

La dynamique des spreads de credit corporate

L’analyse de la dynamique des spreads de crédit renvoie largement à celle des ratings financiers et de leur impact sur le cours des titres de créances.

Cette problématique est régulièrement documentée depuis plus de cinquante ans et a donné lieu à de nombreuses études statistiques. Pour l’essentiel, ces études sont convergentes et font apparaître des réactions différentes des investisseurs en cas de downgrading ou d’upgrading. L’observation du cours des titres de créances met en évidence une anticipation des downgradings par le marché financier, les cours évoluant de façon significative à la baisse plusieurs jours de bourse avant la dégradation. A la date de l’annonce par l’agence, les réactions sur les cours sont de faible ampleur. En revanche, les upgradings ne sont guère anticipés, les porteurs de titres de créances étant surtout vigilants à ne pas subir les moins-values résultant d’une dégradation. Remarquons aussi que du fait de la maturité bornée des titres de créances, les ordres acheteurs sont structurellement plus importants que les ordres vendeurs et qu’en conséquence les seconds sont plus facilement perçus comme des signaux de défiance par le marché.

Des études plus récentes se sont intéressées à l’impact des modifications de rating sur la volatilité et la liquidité des titres. Les dégradations sont précédées d’un accroissement de la volatilité et d’une augmentation du bid-ask spread témoignant d’une réduction de la liquidité ; l’incertitude quant au risque de crédit du titre considéré induit des comportements différenciés parmi les investisseurs et des évaluations disparates. La publication de la note a pour effet d’homogénéiser les perceptions des investisseurs, de réduire la volatilité et d’accroître la liquidité. Les effets sont moins nets en cas d’upgrading, car la modification de note n’étant pas anticipée, l’effet d’homogénéisation des perceptions est moindre et contrebalancé par la volonté de certains investisseurs de mettre à profit cette amélioration de la qualité de crédit pour enregistrer des gains spéculatifs.

Ces études éclairent d’un nouveau jour la question de l’utilité des agences de notation. Les agences transmettent effectivement de l’information aux investisseurs, mais peut-être pas à tous, les investisseurs informés les devançant dans la surveillance de la qualité de crédit des émetteurs. En revanche, les investisseurs moins informés ont besoin de l’avis de l’agence pour être certains que la baisse des prix observée correspond effectivement à une dégradation de la qualité de crédit. L’annonce de l’agence efface cette disparité de perception entre investisseurs et fait ressortir l’utilité de l’agence qui stabilise les prix et accroît la liquidité.

La dynamique des spreads de crédit ne peut pas par ailleurs être étudiée séparément de celle des autres valeurs mobilières. Le monde du crédit n’est évidemment pas coupé de celui des actions. L’intuition nous le fait aisément comprendre. Une baisse du cours de l’action est généralement le corollaire de difficultés opérationnelles se traduisant par une diminution des flux d’exploitation et par une moindre couverture des charges de rémunération et de remboursement de la dette. Parallèlement, cette moindre valeur de l’action est synonyme d’un accroissement du levier financier et, à volatilité du taux de rentabilité des actifs donnée, d’un accroissement de la volatilité du taux de rentabilité de l’action. Se conjuguent ainsi une diminution du cours de l’action, une augmentation du levier financier, un accroissement de la volatilité de l’action ainsi que du risque de crédit.

D’un point de vue théorique, Robert Merton a été le premier à exprimer le spread de crédit en fonction du cours de l’action. On ne reprendra pas ici son travail. On s’intéressera plutôt à la relation credit-equity telle qu’elle est habituellement utilisée dans l’industrie financière. Il est en effet usuel d’utiliser pour cela une fonction puissance libellée sur les taux de croissance :

CDSt / CDSREF = [ SREF / St ] α

Le taux de croissance du spread de crédit, mesuré par le CDS, est ainsi fonction du taux de décroissance du cours de l’action modulo une puissance α que l’on suppose positive,
REF étant une date particulière servant de base de calcul au taux d’évolution du CDS et de l’action.

La connaissance du paramètre α permet de complétement spécifier cette relation. Remarquons tout d’abord que, tel que défini par l’équation précédente, α est l’opposé de l’élasticité de la valeur du CDS par rapport à celle de l’action. En prenant le logarithme de cette équation, il vient :

Ln [CDSt / CDSREF] = – α Ln [ St / SREF ]

α = – Ln [CDSt / CDSREF] / Ln [ St / SREF ]

Rapport de deux taux de croissance relative, le paramètre α est bien, au signe près, l’élasticité de la valeur du CDS par rapport à celle de l’action que l’on peut encore écrire :

α = – [S/CDS] [δCDS / δS]

En exprimant la dérivée de la valeur du CDS par rapport à celle de l’action [δCDS / δS], on est conduit à la valeur suivante du paramètre α :

α = 1 + l avec l = D/(S+D)
Le monde du crédit et celui des actions sont ainsi en étroite relation : une relation inverse relie les spreads de crédit et le cours des actions ; cette relation est fortement dépendante de la structure de financement de l’entreprise et de son levier calculé par rapport au total de bilan (S+D). Plus ce levier est élevé, plus les éventuelles sous performances de l’action se traduiront par des hausses importantes du spread de crédit.

D’un point de vue empirique, si cette corrélation apparaît relativement faible lorsque les marchés sont calmes, elle devient en revanche très significative lorsque les marchés sont volatiles. Lorsque le levier est faible, le graphique représentant l’évolution des spreads de crédit (en ordonnées) par rapport au cours de l’action fait ressortir, une relation plutôt linéaire et proche de l’horizontale ; en revanche, lorsque le levier est plus important une courbe fortement convexe apparaît.

Cette relation étant posée, on peut maintenant s’interroger sur le sens de la relation, ou, si l’on préfère, se demander quel est le marché directeur. Pour cela, il est nécessaire de procéder à des tests de co-intégration du marché du crédit et de celui des actions. L’idée est que ces deux marchés sont sensibles au risque de crédit et à son prix, et que des arbitrageurs vont se charger de faire apparaître une cohérence dans les équilibres de long terme au sein de ces deux marchés.

A cet effet, deux séries de tests économétriques sont menés de façon symétrique. Les premiers cherchent à expliquer les variations du cours des actions par celles des CDS, retardées ou non de plusieurs périodes, et réciproquement pour ce qui est des variations de valeur des CDS en intégrant dans ce dernier cas les évolutions du levier financier. Ces relations, testées sur la période 2008-2020 sur 220 titres cotés appartenant à l’index S&P 500, font ressortir les résultats suivants :

– Il existe des canaux d’information entre le compartiment actions de la cote et le marché des CDS. Ces canaux d’information concernent toutes les entreprises, quels que soient leur secteur ou leur niveau d’endettement : les traders ‘informés’, en raison même de l’existence d’un levier financier, prennent des positions aussi bien sur le marché
actions que sur le marché du crédit.

– Dans la majorité des cas (deux tiers des entreprises étudiées), le marché directeur est le marché actions dont les variations déterminent à concurrence de 70% celles des CDS.

– Toutefois, dans le cas d’entreprises au levier financier important, le processus de découverte des prix prend son origine sur le marché des CDS qui explique plus de 50% des variations de prix.

Ces travaux empiriques montrent toute l’importance, si besoin en était, du modèle structurel de risque de crédit proposé par le prix Nobel Robert Merton en 1974.

Références

Lovo, S., Raimbourg Ph., Salvadè F. (2022), “Credit Rating Agencies, Information Asymmetry, and US Bond Liquidity”, Journal of Business, Finance and Accounting, https://doi.org/10.1111/ jbfa.12610

Zimmermann, P. (2015), « Revisiting the Credit-Equity Power Relationship, The Journal of Fixed Income, 24, 3, 77-87.

Zimmermann, P. (2021), “The Role of the Leverage Effect in the Price Discovery Process of Credit Markets”, Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, 122, 104033.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #5 – Côté culturel


This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 04.-Côté-culturel-1024x153.png

Sophie Chassat
Philosophe, Associée chez Wemean

Réapprendre la simplicité

Cesser de tout voir à travers le prisme de la complexité : c’est sans doute là le réapprentissage le plus difficile que nous ayons à effectuer. Le plus difficile car le paradigme de « la pensée complexe » (Edgar Morin1) a tout envahi. La sémantique que nous utilisons chaque jour en témoigne : rien qui ne soit devenu « systémique », « hybride », « holistique », « liquide » ou « gazeux ». Où que nous tournions nos regards, le monde « VUCA » (volatile, incertain, complexe, ambigu2) s’impose désormais comme notre horizon ultime.

Or, appliqué à toute situation, ce dogme de la complexité nous fait perdre en compréhension, en potentiel d’action et en responsabilité. En compréhension, d’abord, car il impose une représentation baroque du monde où tout est enchevêtré, où la partie est dans le tout mais aussi le tout dans la partie3, où les causes d’un événement sont indéterminables et soumises aux effets de rétroactions de leurs propres conséquences4. Renvoyant la recherche de la vérité à une approche réductrice et mutilante du réel, il encourage également l’équivalence des opinions et accentue ainsi les travers de l’ère de la post-vérité5.

Perte d’action, ensuite, car à partir du moment où tout est complexe, comment ne pas céder à la panique et à la paralysie ? Par où commencer si, dès lors qu’on touche un fil du tissu du réel, toute la bobine risque de s’emmêler encore davantage ? Notre inaction climatique tient en partie à cette représentation du problème comme étant d’une complexité sans fin et à l’idée que la moindre démarche pour le résoudre pose d’autres problèmes encore plus graves. La fable du battement de l’aile de papillon qui, au Brésil, peut générer un ouragan à l’autre bout du monde, nous rend inertes et impuissants. Or « le secret de l’action, c’est de s’y mettre », répétait le philosophe Alain.

« C’est complexe » devient ainsi bien vite une formule d’excuse pour ne pas agir. Alors que l’état du monde nécessiterait que nous nous engagions plus que jamais, nous assistons aujourd’hui à un phénomène de grand désengagement, perceptible dans la sphère civique comme sur le terrain des entreprises. Renvoyant à des effets de systèmes, le dogme de la complexité déresponsabilise les individus. Aussi réapprendre à penser, à agir et à vivre avec simplicité, apparaît-il plus urgent que jamais. Sans que ce chemin ne soit aisé, comme le souligne l’architecte minimaliste John Pawson : « La simplicité est en définitive très difficile à atteindre. Elle repose sur l’attention, la pensée, le savoir et la patience. »6 Ajoutons à ces ingrédients le « courage », celui de remettre en question une représentation du réel triomphante qui pourrait bien être l’une de nos grandes idéologies contemporaines.

____________

1 Publié en 1990, le livre Introduction à la pensée complexe, d’Edgar Morin, présente les grands principes de la pensée complexe.

2 L’acronyme VUCA (Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, Ambiguity) a été forgé par l’armée américaine dans les années 1990.

3 Edgar Morin nomme cette idée le « principe hologrammatique ».

4 C’est ce que l’auteur de La Pensée Complexe appelle « principe récursif »

5 C’est une interprétation possible d’un autre principe de la pensée complexe, le « principe dialogique ».

6 Le livre Minimum, de John Pawson, est paru en 2006.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #5 – Zoom sectoriel


This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 03.-Zoom-sectoriel-1024x153.png

Justine Schmit
Senior Manager,
Accuracy

L’immobilier est-il en haut de cycle ? L’exemple de Paris.

Que penser de la stabilité des prix au m2 de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris, et ce malgré la crise sanitaire ?

Depuis mars 2020, la pandémie de Covid-19 a profondément bouleversé l’économie mondiale provoquant des changements dans de nombreux secteurs, notamment dans l’immobilier résidentiel.

Cette crise sanitaire est notamment à l’origine d’un bouleversement des paradigmes économiques en place depuis les années 2010. La zone euro fait actuellement face à une augmentation forte de l’inflation qui a atteint 5,2% en mai 2022, un niveau sans précédent depuis 1985. Les conditions d’accès au crédit immobilier pour les particuliers deviennent aussi progressivement plus difficiles.

Pourtant, malgré ce contexte et contrairement aux crises précédentes, le prix au m2 des logements anciens à Paris n’a pas connu de baisse significative et est demeuré relativement stable.

Face à cette situation, deux thèses s’opposent : d’une part, certains considèrent que la hausse constante du prix de l’immobilier ancien à Paris est justifiée par son caractère unique, ville des lumières, la mettant à l’abri des cycles économiques tandis que d’autres s’alarment d’une bulle immobilière dans la capitale qui serait sur le point d’éclater.

FAISONS PARLER LES CHIFFRES

Selon la base de données des notaires parisiens, le prix au m2 des logements anciens est passé de 3 463 €/m2 à 10 760 €/m2 entre 1991 et avril 2022, soit une hausse de l’ordre de 3,6% par an en moyenne. En parallèle, l’inflation s’est élevée, sur la même période, à environ 1,8% par an en moyenne, selon l’INSEE.

En synthèse, la valeur du mètre carré parisien a ainsi crû 2 fois plus vite en moyenne que l’inflation.

Sur le graphique ci-dessous, nous pouvons observer la courbe d’augmentation réelle du prix au m2 de l’immobilier à Paris versus une courbe du prix au m2 de 1991, inflatée ensuite chaque année au taux de l’inflation Insee.

Deux phases peuvent être observées sur ce graphe :

Sur la période allant de 1991 à 2004, le prix au m2 réel est resté inférieur au prix de 1991 inflaté Insee. Le prix de l’immobilier avait fortement crû sur la période avant 1991 puis subi une correction majeure d’environ 35% entre 1991 et 1997. C’est seulement en 2004 que la courbe du prix immobilier parisien réelle est revenue croiser la courbe inflatée Insee.

Pour mémoire, l’année 1991 marque une année de haut de cycle ayant achevé une phase haussière de spéculation des marchands de biens à Paris et le début de ce qui sera qualifiée par certains experts de « crise immobilière du siècle ».

• Sur la période allant de 2004 à avril 2022, le prix au m2 réel a crû très significativement, bien plus rapidement que l’inflation économique : +5,0% par an en moyenne pour le prix de l’immobilier réel versus seulement +1,8% pour l’inflation. Il y a ainsi une déconnexion majeure entre l’évolution des prix de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris et l’augmentation moyenne du niveau de vie.

Par ailleurs, il est intéressant de noter qu’entre 2020 et 2022, le prix au m2 à Paris n’a connu aucune variation majeure, contrairement aux crises précédentes (1991 ou 2008).

On observe cependant en ce premier trimestre 2022 le retour d’une inflation significative sans répercussion à ce stade sur les prix réels de l’immobilier.

Est-ce dû à une demande croissante ?

Nombreux sont les défenseurs de la thèse suivante : la demande pour Paris est croissante et confrontée à une offre limitée ce qui a provoqué la hausse constante des prix au m2, et ce même quel que soit la période du cycle économique.

La réalité démographique se révèle, en réalité, bien plus complexe. Ainsi, entre 1990 et 2020, le nombre d’habitants à Paris est passée de 2,15 millions d’habitants à 2,19 millions avec un point culminant de 2,24 millions en 2010. D’autre part, depuis 2021, la population parisienne tend à diminuer progressivement pour atteindre 2,14 millions d’habitants en 2022. En effet, une partie des Parisiens, éprouvée par les restrictions sanitaires, ont décidé de quitter Paris intra-muros pour la petite et grande couronne ou d’autres régions de France.

Cette tendance à la délocalisation hors de Paris intra-muros a également été observée chez les ménages de retour de Londres consécutivement au Brexit.

Cette tendance décroissante s’accompagne d’une augmentation de la pression démographique dans le reste de l’Ile-de-France (hors Paris). Les départements de la Petite et de la Grande Couronne ont vu leur population croître de 8,5 à 10,3 millions d’habitants entre 1990 et 2022.

Ainsi, depuis 1990, Paris connait une dynamique démographique relativement stable amorçant même une baisse depuis 2021. La demande ne semble donc pas permettre de justifier la hausse significative des prix réels de l’immobilier résidentiels à Paris.

Est-ce dû à une offre décroissante ?

A Paris, les volumes de transactions sont plus élevés en période de hausse des prix (entre 35 000 et 40 000 transactions par an en phase haussière) alors que ceux-ci baissent significativement en phase baissière (25 000 à 30 000 transactions).

Il est donc temps de mettre définitivement fin à une idée reçue : la baisse du volume de biens à vendre ne fait pas mécaniquement monter les prix.

La réalité économique est différente : lorsque les prix sont élevés, les propriétaires sont plus enclins à vendre leur bien, soit pour réaliser une plus-value, soit parce qu’ils ont confiance dans le marché et sont disposés à réaliser une opération de vente puis d’achat d’un nouveau bien (souvent dans la séquence inversée d’ailleurs).

A l’inverse, en période de prix décroissants, le marché se grippe. Les propriétaires repoussent au maximum l’éventualité d’une vente dans l’attente de jours meilleurs.

La conclusion à laquelle nous aboutissons est ainsi la suivante : la croissance historique des prix au m2 sur le marché immobilier résidentiel parisien ne s’explique pas par des mécanismes économiques classiques d’offre et de demande.

La dynamique des prix sur ce marché doit même être considérée comme « contra-économique » : l’offre croît en volume lorsque les prix augmentent ; l’offre décroît en volume lorsque les prix baissent.

Lorsque l’on concentre l’analyse sur la crise sanitaire récente, nous observons que les volumes de transactions ont baissé sur le marché parisien. Le marché immobilier résidentiel à Paris a, en effet connu un creux dès le premier confinement, passant de 35 100 transactions par an à 31 200 en 2020 pour revenir à 34 900 sur l’année 2021.

Cette variation s’explique notamment par la structure particulière du confinement, les investisseurs n’ayant plus eu la possibilité de mener à terme la procédure d’achat d’un bien immobilier résidentiel (visites, rendez-vous chez le notaire, déménagement, etc.).

Lorsque les mesures sanitaires strictes ont été levées, le marché immobilier a pu reprendre son activité rapidement.

QUELLES SONT LES CONSÉQUENCES DE LA CRISE DE LA COVID-19 SUR LE MARCHÉ DE L’IMMOBILIER RÉSIDENTIEL À PARIS ?

La modification de nos modes de vie – télétravail et départs de Paris – sous l’effet des restrictions sanitaires devait conduire pour certains investisseurs à une chute des prix de l’immobilier à Paris, voire même à l’éclatement d’une bulle comparable à celle de 1991. Marqués par les confinements successifs et découragés par les conditions plus difficiles d’octroi de crédits immobiliers, les particuliers auraient pu se livrer à un exode massif hors de Paris provoquant une diminution des prix de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris.

Nous observons sur le graphique ci-dessus, que la crise sanitaire semble n’avoir eu que peu d’impact sur les prix du m2 à Paris. Ces derniers ont connu une stagnation, voire une légère diminution sans pour autour descendre sous les 10 000€/ m2 en moyenne.

QUELS SONT LES DRIVERS RÉELLEMENT EXPLICATIFS DE LA HAUSSE DU PRIX AU M2 DE L’IMMOBILIER RÉSIDENTIEL À PARIS ?

La démographie et l’économie n’étant pas vraiment pertinentes pour expliquer la hausse des prix observés sur longue période, quelles sont les variables réellement explicatives de cette évolution ?

Pour répondre à cette question, nous avons construit un modèle de régression multi-variable exploitant des séries historiques longues (1990-2022) et débouchant sur la conclusion suivante :

Depuis 1990, l’évolution des prix au m2 de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris s’explique « intégralement » et « mathématiquement » par deux variables financières.

En mots simples, cela signifie qu’il est possible d’expliquer – et potentiellement prédire – le prix au m2 de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris avec une qualité de prédiction extrêmement élevée et ce à partir de seulement deux variables financières.

– Pour les connaisseurs, notre modèle de régression multi-variable atteint un niveau d’indice de corrélation (R2) de 94%1
La première variable explicative est la suivante :

– Variable 1 : l’écart (ou le « spread ») entre le taux OAT 10 ans France et le taux d’inflation Insee ;

– Comme montré par la graphique ci-dessous, prise isolément, cette variable explique l’évolution du prix au m2 avec un R2 de 79% ;

Ce « spread » représente simplement le taux d’intérêt des emprunteurs retraité de l’inflation économique, soit le taux d’intérêt réel net de l’emprunteur.

Cette variable permet ainsi de prendre en compte l’attractivité des ressources mobilisables par l’emprunteur pour acquérir un bien immobilier résidentiel.

Le spread met en lumière l’impact des taux OAT 10 ans France dans l’évolution des prix immobiliers au m2. En effet, lorsque les taux OAT 10 ans France diminuent, les particuliers voient leur capacité d’emprunt augmenter significativement. Par exemple, si le taux d’emprunt d’un particulier baisse d’un point (100 points de base) alors sa capacité d’emprunt croît d’environ 10%. Or le marché immobilier parisien intègre cette composante dans l’évolution des prix au m2. La baisse des taux a historiquement permis une augmentation de la capacité d’emprunt des acquéreurs mais pas de la surface en m² qu’ils peuvent acheter. Le marché absorbe toute augmentation de la capacité d’emprunt dans les prix au m2.

D’autre part, cette variable prend en compte l’effet de l’inflation sur le marché immobilier. L’année 2017 marque l’apparition d’un effet ciseau entre l’OAT 10 ans France et l’inflation. Les taux d’intérêt demeurent stables tandis que l’inflation redémarre significativement. Pour la première fois, en 2017, le spread (OAT 10 ans – inflation) est passé en négatif, ce qui revient à dire que pour la première fois les emprunteurs particuliers peuvent emprunter à taux réels nets négatifs.

Cet effet ciseau s’est accentué depuis 2018, entraînant la poursuite de la hausse du prix au m2 de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris entre 2018 et 2020.

Mais depuis 2021, l’augmentation inédite de l’inflation couplée à une stagnation des taux directeurs bas sont à l’origine d’un taux de spread financièrement intenable. Ce dernier passe de (0,6) % en 2020 à (3,6) % en 2022. Sur la même période, les prix au m2 ont commencé à régresser alors même que la hausse du coût de la vie a accéléré.

La volonté actuelle de la BCE de relever ses taux directeurs afin de juguler l’inflation devrait venir graduellement atténuer cet effet ciseau historique. Mais les prix au m2 de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris ont définitivement entamé une baisse remarquable.

La baisse du spread de taux n’est pas le seul, ni le meilleur driver explicatif de la hausse historique des prix au m2 à Paris.

La seconde variable historique est la suivante :

– Variable 2 : Taille du bilan de la BCE ;

– Prise isolément cette variable explique le prix au m2 avec un R2 d’environ 94%. Elle est elle-même significativement corrélée avec la première variable, en raison de la coordination des décisions d’évolution de la politique monétaire de la BCE sur ces deux variables.

Cette variable met en lumière les conséquences de la politique d’assouplissement monétaire mise en place par la Banque Centrale Européenne sur la valorisation des classes d’actifs financiers dont l’immobilier à Paris fait partie intégrante.

Pour permettre aux membres de l’Eurogroupe de faire face aux différentes crises économiques (y compris la crise sanitaire), la BCE a mis en place depuis 2009 une politique ambitieuse de Quantitative Easing, à l’image de la Fed, ayant pour objectif d’assurer la stabilité de l’euro en injectant une grande quantité de monnaie sur le marché.

La mise à disposition de cette masse monétaire auprès des banques ainsi que le maintien de taux de directeurs bas sont également à l’origine de la hausse historique du prix de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris.

A partir de nos analyses, il est possible de corréler à 94% l’évolution historique des prix au m2 à Paris avec la taille du bilan de la BCE.

Le graphique ci-dessous présente l’évolution du bilan de la BCE, en progression constante depuis 2009.

Cette forte croissance conventionnelles pour répondre aux crises traversées par l’Euro-système en 2009, 2011 et 2020. En rachetant massivement les titres de dettes publiques et privées sur le marché européen pour servir les demandes de refinancement de la part des banques, la BCE crée des conditions favorables de financement de la zone euro dans un contexte de crise et de taux d’intérêt très bas.

Depuis 2009, la BCE a mis en place deux ambitieux programmes d’achats nets d’actifs : l’Asset Purchase Program (APP) et le Pandemic Emergency Purchase Program (PEPP).Ces derniers sont à l’origine d’une augmentation sans précédent du bilan de la BCE depuis sa création. Cependant, alors qu’entre 2020 et 2022, on observe un nouveau doublement du bilan de la BCE, le prix du m2 de l’immobilier à Paris a connu une légère diminution contre une très forte augmentation sur la période 2011-2021. Cette rupture de tendance est majeure.

CONCLUSION

Sur longue période historique, nous avons observé que l’évolution du prix au m2 à Paris est fortement corrélée à la politique monétaire du régulateur européen et ce via deux variables : le spread (OAT 10 ans – inflation) et la taille du bilan de la BCE.

Entre 1999 et 2020, une formule mathématique a permis de prédire avec un taux de pertinence élevé l’évolution du prix du m2 à Paris. Pour ce faire, il suffisait d’écouter le banquier central européen, anticiper et modéliser ses décisions.

Mais les années 2021 et 2022 sont marquées par un changement drastique des indicateurs macroéconomiques.

L’inflation retrouve des niveaux jamais égalés depuis les années 1970 (5,2% en mai 2022) ce qui provoque un dérèglement du taux de spread. De même, la décision de la BCE de mettre en place un plan de rachat des dettes massifs dans le contexte de la crise sanitaire a conduit à un doublement de la taille de son bilan monétaire sans effet notable sur le prix du m2 à Paris.

Les deux variables qui furent le moteur de la hausse des prix depuis 1999, n’expliquent plus, depuis 2020, l’évolution du prix au m2 de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris. Le modèle est grippé.

Ce fait marque probablement l’entrée dans une période attentiste pouvant entraîner une baisse conjointe des volumes et des prix du m2 (versus l’inflation).

Reste à savoir combien de temps l’investisseur immobilier de 2020 devra encaisser la correction de marché en cours et si l’immobilier parisien jouera bien son rôle de valeur refuge comme lors de la période inflationniste de 1970.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #5 – Histoires de start-up


This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 02.-Histoires-de-start-up-1024x153.png

Romain Proglio
Associé, Accuracy

Rnest

Rnest est un logiciel d’aide à la résolution de problèmes à partir des données web. Philippe Charlot, son fondateur, est parti d’un constat simple : 90% de l’information utile à la prise de décision est présente sur le web. Mais trouver la bonne information est particulièrement complexe. Les sources sont nombreuses, les recherches classiques renvoient à un nombre limité de résultats, et le temps nécessaire à lire, comprendre et synthétiser les pages web est un obstacle important.

Lorsque confronté à une problématique, un utilisateur va habituellement formuler une demande sur des moteurs grand public (Google, Bing, Quant ou encore Yahoo pour ne citer que les principaux) ou pour les plus initiés sur des logiciels de veille (Quid, Palantir, Digimind ou encore Amplyfi). Ces moteurs et logiciels vont chercher les mots clefs dans une page web, sur des sources prédéfinies et pour une productivité quasi nulle.

Grâce à Rnest, l’utilisateur va pouvoir formuler une requête à partir de laquelle le logiciel va mener une exploration précise du web dans une url, un hypertexte ou même un texte proche, et va procéder à la validation précise des pages visitées à l’échelle d’une phrase (et non d’une page), pour un résultat nécessairement beaucoup plus précis et pertinent. Rnest est ainsi capable d’explorer près de 250 000 pages web en quelques heures. Le logiciel est également capable de proposer une note de synthèse problématisée en réponse à la requête initiale.

« Partez de ce que vous connaissez, découvrez ce que personne ne sait encore », promet Rnest. Après avoir formulé la question, quelle que soit sa complexité, l’utilisateur initie la recherche et Rnest explore le web en temps réel pour en extraire les contenus les plus pertinents.

Cette intelligence artificielle, de conception française, navigue en totale indépendance sur le web, s’inspire du comportement humain et répond à des usages extrêmement variés dans tous les secteurs d’activité. Un exemple : à partir de la question « quelles sont les stratégies d’innovation des 200 plus grandes entreprises françaises ? », Rnest va visiter 1 million de pages web, soit l’équivalent de 833 jours d’effort de lecture économisé.

Parmi ses premiers clients, on retrouve notamment BNP Paribas, Bouygues Télécom, Total, EDF, et maintenant Accuracy. Rnest va ainsi faire bénéficier Accuracy de sa puissance dans l’Open Source pour venir enrichir nos conseils aux directions.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #5 – Point de vue


This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 01.-Point-de-vue-1024x153.png

Edito

Jean-François Partiot
Associé, Accuracy

Ma plume se doit d’être plus sage.

Pour cet édito de l’été 2022, j’aurais tout simplement rêvé de vous souhaiter de belles vacances, lumineuses, vaporeuses et enchantées.

Malheureusement, la guerre s’est installée aux portes de l’Europe, les prix s’envolent et la planète suffoque.

Ma plume se doit d’être plus sage.

L’été est propice à la prise de recul : profitons-en pour RÉ-APPRENDRE.

– Réapprendre la simplicité pour retrouver le goût de l’action simple et efficace. Le dogme de la complexité nous paralyse ; détachons-nous de ses liens encombrants ! (Côté Culturel avec Sophie Chassat)

– Réapprendre à vivre ensemble autour de la notion de bien commun et viser une évolution économique raisonnable à long-terme. (Regard sur l’économie avec Hervé Goulletquer)

– Réapprendre à investir à long-terme avec des ressources en quantités limitées, que ce soit :

Dans des technologies du futur :

• Dans Histoires de Start-up avec Romain Proglio, vous découvrirez Rnest, un logiciel
d’aide à la résolution de problèmes à partir du Web. Comment plonger dans la
profondeur et la complexité du web pour remonter à la surface avec des réponses
simples et intelligibles !

Via les grands groupes corporates :

• Dans un contexte de brutale remontée des taux d’intérêt et de durcissement des conditions macro-économiques, il faut réapprendre le lien entre les conditions de financement et la structure financière d’un groupe. Les marchés actions et du crédit sont étroitement liés et leurs évolutions interdépendantes, si bien que les dirigeants doivent finement évaluer les impacts croisés de l’évolution de leur financement. (L’angle académique avec Philippe Raimbourg).

Dans l’immobilier

• L’immobilier est une classe d’actifs considérée comme hautement sûre et prévisible, de surcroît dans des bassins de population et d’activité aussi riches et denses que l’agglomération parisienne. Dans quelle mesure, cette lecture est-elle toujours valable post-2020 après le déferlement de la crise sanitaire et de la vague de capitaux injectés dans l’économie à taux réels négatifs ? (Zoom Sectoriel avec Justine Schmit et Nicolas Paillot de Montabert).

Cet été, inspirons-nous d’Erasme et de sa sagesse toute empreinte d’humanité.
« C’est bien la pire folie que de vouloir être sage dans un monde de fou. »
« Le monde entier est notre patrie à tous. »

Alors, soyons sages, soyons fous, mais soyons respectueux les uns avec les autres et envers les générations à venir !

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #5 (FR)

Pour notre cinquième édition de Accuracy Talks Straight, Jean-François Partiot présentera l’édito, avant de laisser Romain Proglio nous présenter Rnest, un logiciel d’aide à la résolution de problèmes à partir des données web. Nous analyserons ensuite l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris avec Nicolas Paillot de Montabert et Justine Schmit.
Sophie Chassat, Philosophe et associée chez Wemean, nous proposera de réapprendre la simplicité. Enfin, nous nous focaliserons sur la dynamique des spreads de crédit avec Philippe Raimbourg, Directeur de l’Ecole de Management de la Sorbonne et Professeur affilié à ESCP Business School, ainsi que sur Révolution libérale en France avec Hervé Goulletquer, Senior Economic Advisor.


SOMMAIRE


Edito

Jean-François Partiot
Associé, Accuracy

Ma plume se doit d’être plus sage.

Pour cet édito de l’été 2022, j’aurais tout simplement rêvé de vous souhaiter de belles vacances, lumineuses, vaporeuses et enchantées.

Malheureusement, la guerre s’est installée aux portes de l’Europe, les prix s’envolent et la planète suffoque.

Ma plume se doit d’être plus sage.

L’été est propice à la prise de recul : profitons-en pour RÉ-APPRENDRE.

– Réapprendre la simplicité pour retrouver le goût de l’action simple et efficace. Le dogme de la complexité nous paralyse ; détachons-nous de ses liens encombrants ! (Côté Culturel avec Sophie Chassat)

– Réapprendre à vivre ensemble autour de la notion de bien commun et viser une évolution économique raisonnable à long-terme. (Regard sur l’économie avec Hervé Goulletquer)

– Réapprendre à investir à long-terme avec des ressources en quantités limitées, que ce soit :

Dans des technologies du futur :

• Dans Histoires de Start-up avec Romain Proglio, vous découvrirez Rnest, un logiciel
d’aide à la résolution de problèmes à partir du Web. Comment plonger dans la
profondeur et la complexité du web pour remonter à la surface avec des réponses
simples et intelligibles !

Via les grands groupes corporates :

• Dans un contexte de brutale remontée des taux d’intérêt et de durcissement des conditions macro-économiques, il faut réapprendre le lien entre les conditions de financement et la structure financière d’un groupe. Les marchés actions et du crédit sont étroitement liés et leurs évolutions interdépendantes, si bien que les dirigeants doivent finement évaluer les impacts croisés de l’évolution de leur financement. (L’angle académique avec Philippe Raimbourg).

Dans l’immobilier

• L’immobilier est une classe d’actifs considérée comme hautement sûre et prévisible, de surcroît dans des bassins de population et d’activité aussi riches et denses que l’agglomération parisienne. Dans quelle mesure, cette lecture est-elle toujours valable post-2020 après le déferlement de la crise sanitaire et de la vague de capitaux injectés dans l’économie à taux réels négatifs ? (Zoom Sectoriel avec Justine Schmit et Nicolas Paillot de Montabert).

Cet été, inspirons-nous d’Erasme et de sa sagesse toute empreinte d’humanité.
« C’est bien la pire folie que de vouloir être sage dans un monde de fou. »
« Le monde entier est notre patrie à tous. »

Alors, soyons sages, soyons fous, mais soyons respectueux les uns avec les autres et envers les générations à venir !


Romain Proglio
Associé, Accuracy

Rnest

Rnest est un logiciel d’aide à la résolution de problèmes à partir des données web. Philippe Charlot, son fondateur, est parti d’un constat simple : 90% de l’information utile à la prise de décision est présente sur le web. Mais trouver la bonne information est particulièrement complexe. Les sources sont nombreuses, les recherches classiques renvoient à un nombre limité de résultats, et le temps nécessaire à lire, comprendre et synthétiser les pages web est un obstacle important.

Lorsque confronté à une problématique, un utilisateur va habituellement formuler une demande sur des moteurs grand public (Google, Bing, Quant ou encore Yahoo pour ne citer que les principaux) ou pour les plus initiés sur des logiciels de veille (Quid, Palantir, Digimind ou encore Amplyfi). Ces moteurs et logiciels vont chercher les mots clefs dans une page web, sur des sources prédéfinies et pour une productivité quasi nulle.

Grâce à Rnest, l’utilisateur va pouvoir formuler une requête à partir de laquelle le logiciel va mener une exploration précise du web dans une url, un hypertexte ou même un texte proche, et va procéder à la validation précise des pages visitées à l’échelle d’une phrase (et non d’une page), pour un résultat nécessairement beaucoup plus précis et pertinent. Rnest est ainsi capable d’explorer près de 250 000 pages web en quelques heures. Le logiciel est également capable de proposer une note de synthèse problématisée en réponse à la requête initiale.

« Partez de ce que vous connaissez, découvrez ce que personne ne sait encore », promet Rnest. Après avoir formulé la question, quelle que soit sa complexité, l’utilisateur initie la recherche et Rnest explore le web en temps réel pour en extraire les contenus les plus pertinents.

Cette intelligence artificielle, de conception française, navigue en totale indépendance sur le web, s’inspire du comportement humain et répond à des usages extrêmement variés dans tous les secteurs d’activité. Un exemple : à partir de la question « quelles sont les stratégies d’innovation des 200 plus grandes entreprises françaises ? », Rnest va visiter 1 million de pages web, soit l’équivalent de 833 jours d’effort de lecture économisé.

Parmi ses premiers clients, on retrouve notamment BNP Paribas, Bouygues Télécom, Total, EDF, et maintenant Accuracy. Rnest va ainsi faire bénéficier Accuracy de sa puissance dans l’Open Source pour venir enrichir nos conseils aux directions.


Justine Schmit
Senior Manager,
Accuracy

L’immobilier est-il en haut de cycle ? L’exemple de Paris.

Que penser de la stabilité des prix au m2 de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris, et ce malgré la crise sanitaire ?

Depuis mars 2020, la pandémie de Covid-19 a profondément bouleversé l’économie mondiale provoquant des changements dans de nombreux secteurs, notamment dans l’immobilier résidentiel.

Cette crise sanitaire est notamment à l’origine d’un bouleversement des paradigmes économiques en place depuis les années 2010. La zone euro fait actuellement face à une augmentation forte de l’inflation qui a atteint 5,2% en mai 2022, un niveau sans précédent depuis 1985. Les conditions d’accès au crédit immobilier pour les particuliers deviennent aussi progressivement plus difficiles.

Pourtant, malgré ce contexte et contrairement aux crises précédentes, le prix au m2 des logements anciens à Paris n’a pas connu de baisse significative et est demeuré relativement stable.

Face à cette situation, deux thèses s’opposent : d’une part, certains considèrent que la hausse constante du prix de l’immobilier ancien à Paris est justifiée par son caractère unique, ville des lumières, la mettant à l’abri des cycles économiques tandis que d’autres s’alarment d’une bulle immobilière dans la capitale qui serait sur le point d’éclater.

FAISONS PARLER LES CHIFFRES

Selon la base de données des notaires parisiens, le prix au m2 des logements anciens est passé de 3 463 €/m2 à 10 760 €/m2 entre 1991 et avril 2022, soit une hausse de l’ordre de 3,6% par an en moyenne. En parallèle, l’inflation s’est élevée, sur la même période, à environ 1,8% par an en moyenne, selon l’INSEE.

En synthèse, la valeur du mètre carré parisien a ainsi crû 2 fois plus vite en moyenne que l’inflation.

Sur le graphique ci-dessous, nous pouvons observer la courbe d’augmentation réelle du prix au m2 de l’immobilier à Paris versus une courbe du prix au m2 de 1991, inflatée ensuite chaque année au taux de l’inflation Insee.

Deux phases peuvent être observées sur ce graphe :

Sur la période allant de 1991 à 2004, le prix au m2 réel est resté inférieur au prix de 1991 inflaté Insee. Le prix de l’immobilier avait fortement crû sur la période avant 1991 puis subi une correction majeure d’environ 35% entre 1991 et 1997. C’est seulement en 2004 que la courbe du prix immobilier parisien réelle est revenue croiser la courbe inflatée Insee.

Pour mémoire, l’année 1991 marque une année de haut de cycle ayant achevé une phase haussière de spéculation des marchands de biens à Paris et le début de ce qui sera qualifiée par certains experts de « crise immobilière du siècle ».

• Sur la période allant de 2004 à avril 2022, le prix au m2 réel a crû très significativement, bien plus rapidement que l’inflation économique : +5,0% par an en moyenne pour le prix de l’immobilier réel versus seulement +1,8% pour l’inflation. Il y a ainsi une déconnexion majeure entre l’évolution des prix de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris et l’augmentation moyenne du niveau de vie.

Par ailleurs, il est intéressant de noter qu’entre 2020 et 2022, le prix au m2 à Paris n’a connu aucune variation majeure, contrairement aux crises précédentes (1991 ou 2008).

On observe cependant en ce premier trimestre 2022 le retour d’une inflation significative sans répercussion à ce stade sur les prix réels de l’immobilier.

Est-ce dû à une demande croissante ?

Nombreux sont les défenseurs de la thèse suivante : la demande pour Paris est croissante et confrontée à une offre limitée ce qui a provoqué la hausse constante des prix au m2, et ce même quel que soit la période du cycle économique.

La réalité démographique se révèle, en réalité, bien plus complexe. Ainsi, entre 1990 et 2020, le nombre d’habitants à Paris est passée de 2,15 millions d’habitants à 2,19 millions avec un point culminant de 2,24 millions en 2010. D’autre part, depuis 2021, la population parisienne tend à diminuer progressivement pour atteindre 2,14 millions d’habitants en 2022. En effet, une partie des Parisiens, éprouvée par les restrictions sanitaires, ont décidé de quitter Paris intra-muros pour la petite et grande couronne ou d’autres régions de France.

Cette tendance à la délocalisation hors de Paris intra-muros a également été observée chez les ménages de retour de Londres consécutivement au Brexit.

Cette tendance décroissante s’accompagne d’une augmentation de la pression démographique dans le reste de l’Ile-de-France (hors Paris). Les départements de la Petite et de la Grande Couronne ont vu leur population croître de 8,5 à 10,3 millions d’habitants entre 1990 et 2022.

Ainsi, depuis 1990, Paris connait une dynamique démographique relativement stable amorçant même une baisse depuis 2021. La demande ne semble donc pas permettre de justifier la hausse significative des prix réels de l’immobilier résidentiels à Paris.

Est-ce dû à une offre décroissante ?

A Paris, les volumes de transactions sont plus élevés en période de hausse des prix (entre 35 000 et 40 000 transactions par an en phase haussière) alors que ceux-ci baissent significativement en phase baissière (25 000 à 30 000 transactions).

Il est donc temps de mettre définitivement fin à une idée reçue : la baisse du volume de biens à vendre ne fait pas mécaniquement monter les prix.

La réalité économique est différente : lorsque les prix sont élevés, les propriétaires sont plus enclins à vendre leur bien, soit pour réaliser une plus-value, soit parce qu’ils ont confiance dans le marché et sont disposés à réaliser une opération de vente puis d’achat d’un nouveau bien (souvent dans la séquence inversée d’ailleurs).

A l’inverse, en période de prix décroissants, le marché se grippe. Les propriétaires repoussent au maximum l’éventualité d’une vente dans l’attente de jours meilleurs.

La conclusion à laquelle nous aboutissons est ainsi la suivante : la croissance historique des prix au m2 sur le marché immobilier résidentiel parisien ne s’explique pas par des mécanismes économiques classiques d’offre et de demande.

La dynamique des prix sur ce marché doit même être considérée comme « contra-économique » : l’offre croît en volume lorsque les prix augmentent ; l’offre décroît en volume lorsque les prix baissent.

Lorsque l’on concentre l’analyse sur la crise sanitaire récente, nous observons que les volumes de transactions ont baissé sur le marché parisien. Le marché immobilier résidentiel à Paris a, en effet connu un creux dès le premier confinement, passant de 35 100 transactions par an à 31 200 en 2020 pour revenir à 34 900 sur l’année 2021.

Cette variation s’explique notamment par la structure particulière du confinement, les investisseurs n’ayant plus eu la possibilité de mener à terme la procédure d’achat d’un bien immobilier résidentiel (visites, rendez-vous chez le notaire, déménagement, etc.).

Lorsque les mesures sanitaires strictes ont été levées, le marché immobilier a pu reprendre son activité rapidement.

QUELLES SONT LES CONSÉQUENCES DE LA CRISE DE LA COVID-19 SUR LE MARCHÉ DE L’IMMOBILIER RÉSIDENTIEL À PARIS ?

La modification de nos modes de vie – télétravail et départs de Paris – sous l’effet des restrictions sanitaires devait conduire pour certains investisseurs à une chute des prix de l’immobilier à Paris, voire même à l’éclatement d’une bulle comparable à celle de 1991. Marqués par les confinements successifs et découragés par les conditions plus difficiles d’octroi de crédits immobiliers, les particuliers auraient pu se livrer à un exode massif hors de Paris provoquant une diminution des prix de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris.

Nous observons sur le graphique ci-dessus, que la crise sanitaire semble n’avoir eu que peu d’impact sur les prix du m2 à Paris. Ces derniers ont connu une stagnation, voire une légère diminution sans pour autour descendre sous les 10 000€/ m2 en moyenne.

QUELS SONT LES DRIVERS RÉELLEMENT EXPLICATIFS DE LA HAUSSE DU PRIX AU M2 DE L’IMMOBILIER RÉSIDENTIEL À PARIS ?

La démographie et l’économie n’étant pas vraiment pertinentes pour expliquer la hausse des prix observés sur longue période, quelles sont les variables réellement explicatives de cette évolution ?

Pour répondre à cette question, nous avons construit un modèle de régression multi-variable exploitant des séries historiques longues (1990-2022) et débouchant sur la conclusion suivante :

Depuis 1990, l’évolution des prix au m2 de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris s’explique « intégralement » et « mathématiquement » par deux variables financières.

En mots simples, cela signifie qu’il est possible d’expliquer – et potentiellement prédire – le prix au m2 de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris avec une qualité de prédiction extrêmement élevée et ce à partir de seulement deux variables financières.

– Pour les connaisseurs, notre modèle de régression multi-variable atteint un niveau d’indice de corrélation (R2) de 94%1
La première variable explicative est la suivante :

– Variable 1 : l’écart (ou le « spread ») entre le taux OAT 10 ans France et le taux d’inflation Insee ;

– Comme montré par la graphique ci-dessous, prise isolément, cette variable explique l’évolution du prix au m2 avec un R2 de 79% ;

Ce « spread » représente simplement le taux d’intérêt des emprunteurs retraité de l’inflation économique, soit le taux d’intérêt réel net de l’emprunteur.

Cette variable permet ainsi de prendre en compte l’attractivité des ressources mobilisables par l’emprunteur pour acquérir un bien immobilier résidentiel.

Le spread met en lumière l’impact des taux OAT 10 ans France dans l’évolution des prix immobiliers au m2. En effet, lorsque les taux OAT 10 ans France diminuent, les particuliers voient leur capacité d’emprunt augmenter significativement. Par exemple, si le taux d’emprunt d’un particulier baisse d’un point (100 points de base) alors sa capacité d’emprunt croît d’environ 10%. Or le marché immobilier parisien intègre cette composante dans l’évolution des prix au m2. La baisse des taux a historiquement permis une augmentation de la capacité d’emprunt des acquéreurs mais pas de la surface en m² qu’ils peuvent acheter. Le marché absorbe toute augmentation de la capacité d’emprunt dans les prix au m2.

D’autre part, cette variable prend en compte l’effet de l’inflation sur le marché immobilier. L’année 2017 marque l’apparition d’un effet ciseau entre l’OAT 10 ans France et l’inflation. Les taux d’intérêt demeurent stables tandis que l’inflation redémarre significativement. Pour la première fois, en 2017, le spread (OAT 10 ans – inflation) est passé en négatif, ce qui revient à dire que pour la première fois les emprunteurs particuliers peuvent emprunter à taux réels nets négatifs.

Cet effet ciseau s’est accentué depuis 2018, entraînant la poursuite de la hausse du prix au m2 de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris entre 2018 et 2020.

Mais depuis 2021, l’augmentation inédite de l’inflation couplée à une stagnation des taux directeurs bas sont à l’origine d’un taux de spread financièrement intenable. Ce dernier passe de (0,6) % en 2020 à (3,6) % en 2022. Sur la même période, les prix au m2 ont commencé à régresser alors même que la hausse du coût de la vie a accéléré.

La volonté actuelle de la BCE de relever ses taux directeurs afin de juguler l’inflation devrait venir graduellement atténuer cet effet ciseau historique. Mais les prix au m2 de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris ont définitivement entamé une baisse remarquable.

La baisse du spread de taux n’est pas le seul, ni le meilleur driver explicatif de la hausse historique des prix au m2 à Paris.

La seconde variable historique est la suivante :

– Variable 2 : Taille du bilan de la BCE ;

– Prise isolément cette variable explique le prix au m2 avec un R2 d’environ 94%. Elle est elle-même significativement corrélée avec la première variable, en raison de la coordination des décisions d’évolution de la politique monétaire de la BCE sur ces deux variables.

Cette variable met en lumière les conséquences de la politique d’assouplissement monétaire mise en place par la Banque Centrale Européenne sur la valorisation des classes d’actifs financiers dont l’immobilier à Paris fait partie intégrante.

Pour permettre aux membres de l’Eurogroupe de faire face aux différentes crises économiques (y compris la crise sanitaire), la BCE a mis en place depuis 2009 une politique ambitieuse de Quantitative Easing, à l’image de la Fed, ayant pour objectif d’assurer la stabilité de l’euro en injectant une grande quantité de monnaie sur le marché.

La mise à disposition de cette masse monétaire auprès des banques ainsi que le maintien de taux de directeurs bas sont également à l’origine de la hausse historique du prix de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris.

A partir de nos analyses, il est possible de corréler à 94% l’évolution historique des prix au m2 à Paris avec la taille du bilan de la BCE.

Le graphique ci-dessous présente l’évolution du bilan de la BCE, en progression constante depuis 2009.

Cette forte croissance conventionnelles pour répondre aux crises traversées par l’Euro-système en 2009, 2011 et 2020. En rachetant massivement les titres de dettes publiques et privées sur le marché européen pour servir les demandes de refinancement de la part des banques, la BCE crée des conditions favorables de financement de la zone euro dans un contexte de crise et de taux d’intérêt très bas.

Depuis 2009, la BCE a mis en place deux ambitieux programmes d’achats nets d’actifs : l’Asset Purchase Program (APP) et le Pandemic Emergency Purchase Program (PEPP).Ces derniers sont à l’origine d’une augmentation sans précédent du bilan de la BCE depuis sa création. Cependant, alors qu’entre 2020 et 2022, on observe un nouveau doublement du bilan de la BCE, le prix du m2 de l’immobilier à Paris a connu une légère diminution contre une très forte augmentation sur la période 2011-2021. Cette rupture de tendance est majeure.

CONCLUSION

Sur longue période historique, nous avons observé que l’évolution du prix au m2 à Paris est fortement corrélée à la politique monétaire du régulateur européen et ce via deux variables : le spread (OAT 10 ans – inflation) et la taille du bilan de la BCE.

Entre 1999 et 2020, une formule mathématique a permis de prédire avec un taux de pertinence élevé l’évolution du prix du m2 à Paris. Pour ce faire, il suffisait d’écouter le banquier central européen, anticiper et modéliser ses décisions.

Mais les années 2021 et 2022 sont marquées par un changement drastique des indicateurs macroéconomiques.

L’inflation retrouve des niveaux jamais égalés depuis les années 1970 (5,2% en mai 2022) ce qui provoque un dérèglement du taux de spread. De même, la décision de la BCE de mettre en place un plan de rachat des dettes massifs dans le contexte de la crise sanitaire a conduit à un doublement de la taille de son bilan monétaire sans effet notable sur le prix du m2 à Paris.

Les deux variables qui furent le moteur de la hausse des prix depuis 1999, n’expliquent plus, depuis 2020, l’évolution du prix au m2 de l’immobilier résidentiel à Paris. Le modèle est grippé.

Ce fait marque probablement l’entrée dans une période attentiste pouvant entraîner une baisse conjointe des volumes et des prix du m2 (versus l’inflation).

Reste à savoir combien de temps l’investisseur immobilier de 2020 devra encaisser la correction de marché en cours et si l’immobilier parisien jouera bien son rôle de valeur refuge comme lors de la période inflationniste de 1970.


Sophie Chassat
Philosophe, Associée chez Wemean

Réapprendre la simplicité

Cesser de tout voir à travers le prisme de la complexité : c’est sans doute là le réapprentissage le plus difficile que nous ayons à effectuer. Le plus difficile car le paradigme de « la pensée complexe » (Edgar Morin1) a tout envahi. La sémantique que nous utilisons chaque jour en témoigne : rien qui ne soit devenu « systémique », « hybride », « holistique », « liquide » ou « gazeux ». Où que nous tournions nos regards, le monde « VUCA » (volatile, incertain, complexe, ambigu2) s’impose désormais comme notre horizon ultime.

Or, appliqué à toute situation, ce dogme de la complexité nous fait perdre en compréhension, en potentiel d’action et en responsabilité. En compréhension, d’abord, car il impose une représentation baroque du monde où tout est enchevêtré, où la partie est dans le tout mais aussi le tout dans la partie3, où les causes d’un événement sont indéterminables et soumises aux effets de rétroactions de leurs propres conséquences4. Renvoyant la recherche de la vérité à une approche réductrice et mutilante du réel, il encourage également l’équivalence des opinions et accentue ainsi les travers de l’ère de la post-vérité5.

Perte d’action, ensuite, car à partir du moment où tout est complexe, comment ne pas céder à la panique et à la paralysie ? Par où commencer si, dès lors qu’on touche un fil du tissu du réel, toute la bobine risque de s’emmêler encore davantage ? Notre inaction climatique tient en partie à cette représentation du problème comme étant d’une complexité sans fin et à l’idée que la moindre démarche pour le résoudre pose d’autres problèmes encore plus graves. La fable du battement de l’aile de papillon qui, au Brésil, peut générer un ouragan à l’autre bout du monde, nous rend inertes et impuissants. Or « le secret de l’action, c’est de s’y mettre », répétait le philosophe Alain.

« C’est complexe » devient ainsi bien vite une formule d’excuse pour ne pas agir. Alors que l’état du monde nécessiterait que nous nous engagions plus que jamais, nous assistons aujourd’hui à un phénomène de grand désengagement, perceptible dans la sphère civique comme sur le terrain des entreprises. Renvoyant à des effets de systèmes, le dogme de la complexité déresponsabilise les individus. Aussi réapprendre à penser, à agir et à vivre avec simplicité, apparaît-il plus urgent que jamais. Sans que ce chemin ne soit aisé, comme le souligne l’architecte minimaliste John Pawson : « La simplicité est en définitive très difficile à atteindre. Elle repose sur l’attention, la pensée, le savoir et la patience. »6 Ajoutons à ces ingrédients le « courage », celui de remettre en question une représentation du réel triomphante qui pourrait bien être l’une de nos grandes idéologies contemporaines.

____________

1 Publié en 1990, le livre Introduction à la pensée complexe, d’Edgar Morin, présente les grands principes de la pensée complexe.

2 L’acronyme VUCA (Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, Ambiguity) a été forgé par l’armée américaine dans les années 1990.

3 Edgar Morin nomme cette idée le « principe hologrammatique ».

4 C’est ce que l’auteur de La Pensée Complexe appelle « principe récursif »

5 C’est une interprétation possible d’un autre principe de la pensée complexe, le « principe dialogique ».

6 Le livre Minimum, de John Pawson, est paru en 2006.


Philippe Raimbourg
Directeur de l’Ecole de Management de la Sorbonne (Université Panthéon-Sorbonne)
Professeur affilié à ESCP Business School

La dynamique des spreads de credit corporate

L’analyse de la dynamique des spreads de crédit renvoie largement à celle des ratings financiers et de leur impact sur le cours des titres de créances.

Cette problématique est régulièrement documentée depuis plus de cinquante ans et a donné lieu à de nombreuses études statistiques. Pour l’essentiel, ces études sont convergentes et font apparaître des réactions différentes des investisseurs en cas de downgrading ou d’upgrading. L’observation du cours des titres de créances met en évidence une anticipation des downgradings par le marché financier, les cours évoluant de façon significative à la baisse plusieurs jours de bourse avant la dégradation. A la date de l’annonce par l’agence, les réactions sur les cours sont de faible ampleur. En revanche, les upgradings ne sont guère anticipés, les porteurs de titres de créances étant surtout vigilants à ne pas subir les moins-values résultant d’une dégradation. Remarquons aussi que du fait de la maturité bornée des titres de créances, les ordres acheteurs sont structurellement plus importants que les ordres vendeurs et qu’en conséquence les seconds sont plus facilement perçus comme des signaux de défiance par le marché.

Des études plus récentes se sont intéressées à l’impact des modifications de rating sur la volatilité et la liquidité des titres. Les dégradations sont précédées d’un accroissement de la volatilité et d’une augmentation du bid-ask spread témoignant d’une réduction de la liquidité ; l’incertitude quant au risque de crédit du titre considéré induit des comportements différenciés parmi les investisseurs et des évaluations disparates. La publication de la note a pour effet d’homogénéiser les perceptions des investisseurs, de réduire la volatilité et d’accroître la liquidité. Les effets sont moins nets en cas d’upgrading, car la modification de note n’étant pas anticipée, l’effet d’homogénéisation des perceptions est moindre et contrebalancé par la volonté de certains investisseurs de mettre à profit cette amélioration de la qualité de crédit pour enregistrer des gains spéculatifs.

Ces études éclairent d’un nouveau jour la question de l’utilité des agences de notation. Les agences transmettent effectivement de l’information aux investisseurs, mais peut-être pas à tous, les investisseurs informés les devançant dans la surveillance de la qualité de crédit des émetteurs. En revanche, les investisseurs moins informés ont besoin de l’avis de l’agence pour être certains que la baisse des prix observée correspond effectivement à une dégradation de la qualité de crédit. L’annonce de l’agence efface cette disparité de perception entre investisseurs et fait ressortir l’utilité de l’agence qui stabilise les prix et accroît la liquidité.

La dynamique des spreads de crédit ne peut pas par ailleurs être étudiée séparément de celle des autres valeurs mobilières. Le monde du crédit n’est évidemment pas coupé de celui des actions. L’intuition nous le fait aisément comprendre. Une baisse du cours de l’action est généralement le corollaire de difficultés opérationnelles se traduisant par une diminution des flux d’exploitation et par une moindre couverture des charges de rémunération et de remboursement de la dette. Parallèlement, cette moindre valeur de l’action est synonyme d’un accroissement du levier financier et, à volatilité du taux de rentabilité des actifs donnée, d’un accroissement de la volatilité du taux de rentabilité de l’action. Se conjuguent ainsi une diminution du cours de l’action, une augmentation du levier financier, un accroissement de la volatilité de l’action ainsi que du risque de crédit.

D’un point de vue théorique, Robert Merton a été le premier à exprimer le spread de crédit en fonction du cours de l’action. On ne reprendra pas ici son travail. On s’intéressera plutôt à la relation credit-equity telle qu’elle est habituellement utilisée dans l’industrie financière. Il est en effet usuel d’utiliser pour cela une fonction puissance libellée sur les taux de croissance :

CDSt / CDSREF = [ SREF / St ] α

Le taux de croissance du spread de crédit, mesuré par le CDS, est ainsi fonction du taux de décroissance du cours de l’action modulo une puissance α que l’on suppose positive,
REF étant une date particulière servant de base de calcul au taux d’évolution du CDS et de l’action.

La connaissance du paramètre α permet de complétement spécifier cette relation. Remarquons tout d’abord que, tel que défini par l’équation précédente, α est l’opposé de l’élasticité de la valeur du CDS par rapport à celle de l’action. En prenant le logarithme de cette équation, il vient :

Ln [CDSt / CDSREF] = – α Ln [ St / SREF ]

α = – Ln [CDSt / CDSREF] / Ln [ St / SREF ]

Rapport de deux taux de croissance relative, le paramètre α est bien, au signe près, l’élasticité de la valeur du CDS par rapport à celle de l’action que l’on peut encore écrire :

α = – [S/CDS] [δCDS / δS]

En exprimant la dérivée de la valeur du CDS par rapport à celle de l’action [δCDS / δS], on est conduit à la valeur suivante du paramètre α :

α = 1 + l avec l = D/(S+D)
Le monde du crédit et celui des actions sont ainsi en étroite relation : une relation inverse relie les spreads de crédit et le cours des actions ; cette relation est fortement dépendante de la structure de financement de l’entreprise et de son levier calculé par rapport au total de bilan (S+D). Plus ce levier est élevé, plus les éventuelles sous performances de l’action se traduiront par des hausses importantes du spread de crédit.

D’un point de vue empirique, si cette corrélation apparaît relativement faible lorsque les marchés sont calmes, elle devient en revanche très significative lorsque les marchés sont volatiles. Lorsque le levier est faible, le graphique représentant l’évolution des spreads de crédit (en ordonnées) par rapport au cours de l’action fait ressortir, une relation plutôt linéaire et proche de l’horizontale ; en revanche, lorsque le levier est plus important une courbe fortement convexe apparaît.

Cette relation étant posée, on peut maintenant s’interroger sur le sens de la relation, ou, si l’on préfère, se demander quel est le marché directeur. Pour cela, il est nécessaire de procéder à des tests de co-intégration du marché du crédit et de celui des actions. L’idée est que ces deux marchés sont sensibles au risque de crédit et à son prix, et que des arbitrageurs vont se charger de faire apparaître une cohérence dans les équilibres de long terme au sein de ces deux marchés.

A cet effet, deux séries de tests économétriques sont menés de façon symétrique. Les premiers cherchent à expliquer les variations du cours des actions par celles des CDS, retardées ou non de plusieurs périodes, et réciproquement pour ce qui est des variations de valeur des CDS en intégrant dans ce dernier cas les évolutions du levier financier. Ces relations, testées sur la période 2008-2020 sur 220 titres cotés appartenant à l’index S&P 500, font ressortir les résultats suivants :

– Il existe des canaux d’information entre le compartiment actions de la cote et le marché des CDS. Ces canaux d’information concernent toutes les entreprises, quels que soient leur secteur ou leur niveau d’endettement : les traders ‘informés’, en raison même de l’existence d’un levier financier, prennent des positions aussi bien sur le marché
actions que sur le marché du crédit.

– Dans la majorité des cas (deux tiers des entreprises étudiées), le marché directeur est le marché actions dont les variations déterminent à concurrence de 70% celles des CDS.

– Toutefois, dans le cas d’entreprises au levier financier important, le processus de découverte des prix prend son origine sur le marché des CDS qui explique plus de 50% des variations de prix.

Ces travaux empiriques montrent toute l’importance, si besoin en était, du modèle structurel de risque de crédit proposé par le prix Nobel Robert Merton en 1974.

Références

Lovo, S., Raimbourg Ph., Salvadè F. (2022), “Credit Rating Agencies, Information Asymmetry, and US Bond Liquidity”, Journal of Business, Finance and Accounting, https://doi.org/10.1111/ jbfa.12610

Zimmermann, P. (2015), « Revisiting the Credit-Equity Power Relationship, The Journal of Fixed Income, 24, 3, 77-87.

Zimmermann, P. (2021), “The Role of the Leverage Effect in the Price Discovery Process of Credit Markets”, Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, 122, 104033.


Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Advisor, Accuracy

Révolution libérale et évolution raisonnable

La récente élection législative française envoie un nouveau message sur le mécontentement des citoyens électeurs dans nombre de pays, concernant l’évolution de leur environnement. Presque 60% des Français inscrits sur les listes électorales ont fait le choix… de ne pas choisir (abstentions et votes blancs ou nuls) et près de 40% de ceux qui ont exprimé une préférence partisane l’ont fait en faveur d’organisations (partis ou réunion de partis) de tradition plutôt contestataire (Le Rassemblement National et la Nouvelle Union Populaire, Ecologique et Sociale).

Si on prend une focale courte, trouver les raisons de ce mélange de pessimisme et de mauvaise humeur, confirmé au demeurant par un repli marqué de la confiance des ménages, n’est pas très compliqué.

La nette accélération des prix et la guerre à la frontière de l’Union Européenne, les deux phénomènes n’étant pas indépendants, en sont les raisons évidentes. Ces bouleversements, dont la gravité n’est pas du tout à minorer (nous allons le voir), s’ajoutent et en fait amplifient un mal-être solidement en place depuis déjà longtemps. Sans remonter inutilement loin en arrière, comment ne pas reconnaître que le monde a enregistré au cours des quinze dernières années toute une série d’évènements qui participent, si ce n’est d’une perte de repères, d’une remise en cause de la façon de percevoir l’environnement dans lequel chacun évolue ? Dressons en une liste, sans forcément chercher à être exhaustif :

• la crise financière (2008),

• le balancement entre des Etats-Unis plutôt en retrait des affaires du monde et une Chine jusqu’à maintenant de plus en plus présente (les nouvelles routes de la soie en 2015) et au milieu une Europe qui se cherche (le Brexit en 2016),

• la réorientation de la politique américaine vis-à-vis de la Chine (méfiance et prise de distance à partir de 2017),

• la remise en cause des frontières de ses voisins par la Russie (2008, 2014 et donc et très récemment en février de cette année),

• la fragilisation des Sociétés (des printemps arabes en 2010 – 2011 aux gilets jaunes français en 2018 et à l’assaut sur le Congrès des Etats-Unis en 2021 ; des mouvement
Black Lives Matter – 2013 – à la crise des réfugiés – 2015 – et aux attentats de Paris – 2015 –),

• la montée de la question environnementale (de l’accident de Fukushima au Japon en 2011 à une prise de conscience plus entière du réchauffement climatique à partir
de 2018, entre autres avec Greta Thunberg),

• une économie qui ne fonctionne pas au bénéfice de tous (les Panama papers en 2016 sur les processus d’évitement de l’impôt), sur fond justement de contraste entre des performances macroéconomiques passables, voire médiocres, et microéconomiques plus étincelantes – cf. PIB, et donc revenus, vs profits des entreprises cotées –),

• une crise épidémique mondiale (la COVID 19) qui pointe la fragilité de chaines de production trop longues et trop complexes (le just in case qui supplanterait le just in time ; avec quelles conséquences économiques ?) et encore plus celle de l’espèce humaine qui aurait abusé de trop de « mère nature »,

• in fine, la question politique et sociale (besoin de protection et partage des richesses) s’impose progressivement dans le débat électoral.

C’est sur ces soubassements déjà fragilisés que les évènements les plus récents (l’inflation et la guerre, pour faire simple) sont ressentis comme des vecteurs possibles de rupture ; un peu comme des catalyseurs éventuels de changements jusqu’alors davantage latents. Cette rupture pourrait être de deux ordres. D’abord et selon une démarche déductive, il y a le risque qu’une sorte de tectonique des plaques, pour reprendre l’expression de Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas, le nouveau Chef-économiste du FMI, se mette en place, « fragmentant le système économique mondial, en blocs distincts, chacun avec sa propre idéologie, son propre système politique, ses propres standards technologiques, ses propres systèmes commerciaux et de paiement et sa propre monnaie de réserve ».

La géographie politique du monde serait profondément transformée, avec la déstabilisation économique qui, au moins dans un premier temps, en découlerait. Ensuite et en fonction d’une approche empirique tirée de l’histoire appliquée (l’Applied History, selon l’expression du monde académique anglo-saxon), il y a ce parallèle qu’il est peut-être tentant de faire entre la situation actuelle et celle ayant prévalu à partir de la seconde moitié des années 70. A l’époque, les ingrédients sont des épisodes de guerre ou de changement de régime au Moyen-Orient et un fort renchérissement des cours du pétrole. La conséquence est double : l’enclenchement d’une spirale inflationniste et un changement de « régulation », à la fois moins interventionniste et keynésienne et plus libérale et « friedmaniènne » : moins d’allant systématique pour l’activisme budgétaire, allègement des réglementations du marché du travail, privatisation d’entreprises publiques et plus grande ouverture aux échanges extérieurs.

Creusons ce deuxième sujet ; au moins essayons. En gardant à l’esprit que, au même titre que corrélation n’est pas raison, parallèle peut être bagatelle ! Par quel cheminement, des causes comparables produiraient certes un changement dans la conduite de l’économie, mais de direction opposée ? N’est-il pas dans l’air du temps de pronostiquer le retour à des politiques économiques plus volontaristes et faisant moins la part belle au « laisser-faire » ? Oui, bien sûr ; mais il faut comprendre que cette aspiration tient plus de la réaction à un cadre général considéré comme dysfonctionnel que de la recherche d’une réponse adaptée à un début d’emballement des prix.

Les opinions publiques (ou ceux qui les influencent) expriment une insatisfaction et considèrent que l’origine du problème à la genèse de celle-ci est à rechercher dans la régulation en cours aujourd’hui. Avec alors la mise en avant d’une attitude qui consiste à plébisciter l’alternative à la logique en cours : adieu Friedman et content de te revoir Keynes !

Il n’empêche que, au-delà de causalités pas toujours bien « ficelées », l’aspiration à un changement d’administration de l’économie demeure. Les maîtres-mots en seraient les suivants : transition énergétique et inclusion. Ce qui signifie : coopération entre pays (oui à la concurrence au sein d’un monde ouvert, mais non à la rivalité stratégique), rapprochement entre les décideurs publics, mais aussi privés, et les différents autres acteurs de la vie économique et sociale (le stakeholding) et retour à une redistribution « normale » des milieux les plus favorisés vers ceux les plus modestes. Pour reprendre les mots de Dani Rodrik, professeur à l’université d’Harvard, « un système économique mondialisé ne peut pas être la fin et les équilibres politiques et sociaux propres à chaque pays, un moyen ; il faut remettre la logique dans le bon sens (revenir en quelque sorte à l’esprit de Bretton Woods) ».

Ainsi, au moins peut-on l’espérer, la « fragmentation du système économique mondial » n’aurait pas lieu et l’inflation serait contenue. Au moins en Occident, l’essentiel des citoyens et des responsables politiques devrait aligner leurs aspirations et leurs efforts dans cette quête. Les entreprises suivraient-elles ? N’ont-elles pas à y perdre, au moins pour les plus grandes d’entre-elles ?

On doit évidemment soulever la difficulté qui peut exister entre la pratique de la mondialisation économique vécue au cours des quelque trente dernières années et les valeurs qui s’imposent maintenant dans la Société. Cela nécessite une adaptation ; mais sans qu’il faille opposer le comportement d’autrefois aux aspirations, très certainement durables, qui sont apparues. En regardant devant (loin devant !), il n’y aura pas de réussite économique dans un monde devenu invivable à cause du climat ou de la politique.

Il est possible ponctuellement de « faire plus d’argent » en optimisant les relations avec les clients, les fournisseurs et les employés ; dans une perspective plus longue, une planète « fonctionnelle » et une Société « apaisée » sont des prérequis qui s’imposent. Peut-être a-t-on trop facilement tendance à opposer frontalement logique de marché aux logiques étatique et sociétale. Sans doute est-il davantage question de positionner au bon endroit le curseur en fonction des changements observés ou pressentis On en est là aujourd’hui et il s’agit bien plus d’évolution que de révolution !


Lire la quatrième édition de Accuracy Talks Straight >

Economic brief: what the figures tell us (#14)

With the global economy in turmoil, energy prices are exploding. A general rising trend in the prices of oil and gas since mid-last year has been compounded in recent weeks by the war in Ukraine and the economic reprisals taken by the West against Russia. These reprisals now include a partial embargo on Russian hydrocarbons. But what does that mean in the short term? And how does the current situation compare with the oil crisis of the 1970s? Let us delve into the matter in this Economic Brief.

Economic brief: what the figures tell us (#13)

The world economy is experiencing shock after shock arising from various sources: the COVID-19 pandemic, supply chain shortages, the war in Ukraine, severe inflationary conditions and stalling growth. However, in this edition of the Economic Brief, we will delve into the real estate sector to consider just how the economy is faring; after all, as the French saying goes, ‘when real estate is doing well, everything is’. 1


1 Quand l’immobilier va, tout va.

Accuracy advises SPAC Pegasus Entrepreneurs

Accuracy has been assigned by SPAC Pegasus Entrepreneurs to perform the financial due diligence in the context of the following operation:

FL Entertainment (composed of Banijay Group and Betclic Everest Group) is merging with SPAC Pegasus Entrepreneurs, which has been backed by European investment firm Tikehau Capital and Financière Agache.

Transaction gives implied pro forma equity value of €4.1 billion and pro forma enterprise value of €7.2 billion – the largest business combination by a European-listed SPAC

The Banijay Group is the world’s largest independent content production company. The Betclic Everest Group operates in the online sports betting and gaming segment.

Economic brief: what the figures tell us (#12)

This edition of the Economic Brief sees us delve into economic matters at a global level. We will review the latest World Economic Outlook projections prepared by the International Monetary Fund to review the macro impact of the war in Ukraine, and we will move on to consider price dynamics in the three major economic zones: the US, the eurozone and China.

Accuracy conseille Andera Partners

Accuracy a réalisé les travaux de buy-side due diligence pour Andera Partners dans le cadre de l’acquisition d’une particitation de Telecom Design.

Accuracy advises Andera Partners

Accuracy conducted strategic buy-side due diligence for Andera Partners in the context of the acquisition of a stake in Telecom Design.

Accuracy advises FNB

Accuracy conducted financial buy-side due diligence for FNB in the context of the acquisition of Moussline (Nestlé).

Accuracy conseille FNB

Accuracy a réalisé les travaux de due diligence financière pour FNB, un fonds d’investissement spécialisé dans les PME de l’industrie agro-alimentaire, dans le cadre de l’acquisition des activités de purée de pommes de terre Moussline (Nestlé).

Accuracy Talks Straight #4 – Economic point of view

When improvement does not necessarily rhyme with simplification

Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Advisor, Accuracy

Today, though this statement may apply more to developed countries than to developing countries, the economic landscape appears on the surface more promising. COVID-19 is on the verge of transforming from epidemic into endemic. Economic recovery is considered likely to last, and the delay to growth accumulated during the COVID-19 crisis has mostly been caught up. Last but not least, prices are accelerating.

This last phenomenon is quite spectacular, with a year-on-year change in consumer prices passing in the space of two years (from early 2020 to early 2022) from 1.9% to 7.5% in the United States and from 1.4% to 5.1% in the eurozone. What’s more, this acceleration is proving stronger and lasting longer than the idea we had of the consequences on the price profile of opening up an economy previously hindered by public health measures.

Faced with these dynamics on the dual front of health and the real economy, opinions on the initiatives to be taken by central banks have changed. The capital markets are calling for the rapid normalisation of monetary policies: stopping the increase in the size of balance sheets and then reducing them, as well as returning the reference rates to levels deemed more normal. This, of course, comes with the creation of both upward pressure and distortions in the rate curves, as well as a loss of direction in the equity markets.

At this stage, let’s have a quick look back to see how far we may have to go. During the epidemic crisis, the main Western central banks (the Fed in the US, the ECB in the eurozone, the Bank of Japan and the Bank of England) accepted a remarkable increase in the size of their balance sheets. For these four banks alone, the balance sheet/GDP ratio went from 36% at the beginning of 2020 to 60% at the end of 2021. This is the counterpart to the bonds bought and the liquidity injected in their respective banking systems. At the same time, the reference rates were positioned or maintained as low as possible (based on the economic and financial characteristics of each country or zone): at +0.25% in the US, at -0.50% in the eurozone, at -0.10% in Japan and at +0.10% in the UK. This pair of initiatives served to ensure the most favourable monetary and financial conditions. They ‘supplemented’ the actions taken by the public authorities: often state-backed loans granted to businesses and furlough measures in parallel to significant support to the economy (around 4.5 points of GDP on average for the OECD zone; note, the two types of measure may partly overlap).

Now, let’s try to set out the monetary policy debate. The net rebound of economic growth in 2021, the widely shared feeling that economic activity will continue following an upward trend, and price developments that are struggling to get back into line all contribute to a situation that justifies the beginning of monetary policy normalisation. It goes without saying that the timing and the rhythm of this normalisation depend on conditions specific to each geography.

HOWEVER, WE MUST BE AWARE OF THE SINGULAR NATURE OF THE CURRENT SITUATION.

The current inflationary dynamics are not primarily the reflection of excessively strong demand stumbling over a supply side already at full capacity.

More so, they reflect – and quite considerably – production and distribution apparatuses that cannot operate at an optimal rhythm because of the disorganisation caused by the epidemic and sometimes by the effects brought about by public policies. The return to normal – and if possible quickly – is a necessity, unless we are willing to accept lasting losses of supply capacity. With this in mind, we must be careful not to speed down the road to monetary neutrality; otherwise, we risk a loss of momentum in economic growth and a sharp decline in financial markets, both of which would lead us away from the desired goal.

Another point must be mentioned, even if it is more classic in nature: the acceleration of consumer prices is not without incident on households. It gnaws away at their purchasing power and acts negatively on their confidence, both things that serve to slow down private consumption and therefore economic activity.

THIS IS ANOTHER ELEMENT SUPPORTING THE GRADUAL NORMALISATION OF MONETARY POLICY.

How do the two ‘major’ central banks (the Fed in the US and the ECB in the eurozone) go about charting their course on this path, marked out on the one hand by the impatience of the capital markets and on the other by the need to take account of the singularity of the moment and the dexterity that this singularity requires when conducting monetary policy?

All we can do is observe a certain ‘crab walk’ by the Fed and the ECB. Let’s explain and start with the US central bank.

The key phrase of the communiqué at the end of the recent monetary policy committee of 26 January is without doubt the following: ‘With inflation well above 2 percent and a strong labor market, the Committee expects it will soon be appropriate to raise the target range for the federal funds rate.’ Not surprisingly, the reference rate was raised by 25 percentage points on 16 March, and as there is no forward guidance, the rhythm of the monetary normalisation will be data dependent (based on the image of the economy drawn by the most recently published economic indicators). At first, the focus will be on the price profile; then, the importance of the activity profile will grow.

The market, with its perception of growth and inflation, will be quick to anticipate a rapid pace of policy rate increases. The Fed, having approved the start of the movement, is trying to control its tempo. Not the easiest of tasks!

Let’s move on to the ECB. The market retained two things from the meeting of the Council of Governors on 3 February: risks regarding future inflation developments are on the rise and the possibility of a policy rate increase as early as this year cannot be ruled out.

Of course, the analysis put forward at the time was more balanced, and since then, Christine Lagarde and certain other members of the Council, such as François Villeroy de Galhau, have been working to moderate market expectations that are doubtlessly considered excessive.

We can see it clearly. It will all be a question of timing and good pacing in this incipient period of normalisation. In medio stat virtus1 , as Aristotle reminds us. But how establishing it can be difficult!

____________

1 Virtue lies in a just middle.

IMPACT OF THE RUSSIAN INVASION OF UKRAINE:
NECESSARY DOWNWARD REVISION OF ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT

The world outside Russia, especially Europe, will not get through the crisis unscathed. The continued acceleration of prices and the fall in confidence are the principal reasons for this. Indeed, the price of crude oil has increased by over 30% (+35 dollars per barrel) since the beginning of military operations, and the price of ‘European’ gas has almost doubled. In the same way, it is impossible to extrapolate the rebound in the PMI indices of many countries in February; they are practically ancient history. Growth will slow down and inflation will become more intense, with the United States suffering less than the eurozone.

Vigilance (caution) may need to be even greater. This new shock (the scale of which remains unknown) is rattling an economic system that is still in recovery: the epidemic is being followed by a difficult rebalancing of supply and demand, creating an unusual upward trend in prices compared with the past few decades. Is the economic system’s resistance weaker as a result?

• In these conditions, monetary normalisation will be more gradual than anticipated. Central banks should monitor the increase in energy (and also food) prices and focus more on price dynamics excluding these two components – what we call the ‘core’. The most likely assumption is that this core will experience a slower tempo, above all because of less well-orientated demand.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #4 – The Academic Insight

The long-term discount rate

Philippe Raimbourg
Director of the Ecole de Management de la Sorbonne (Université Panthéon-Sorbonne)
Affiliate professor at ESCP Business School

If since Irving Fisher we know that the value of an asset equals the discounted value of the cash flows that it can generate, we also know that the discounting process significantly erodes the value of long-term cash flows and reduces the attractiveness of long-term projects.

THIS RESULT IS THE CONSEQUENCE OF A DUAL PHENOMENON:

the passage of time, which automatically whittles down the present value of all remote cash flows;
the shape of the yield-to-maturity curve, which generally leads to the use of higher discount rates the further in the future the cash flows are due; indeed, we usually observe that the yield curve increases with the maturity of the cash flow considered.

THE DISCOUNTING PROCESS SIGNIFICANTLY ERODES THE VALUE OF LONG-TERM CASH FLOWS

For this reason, the majority of companies generally invest in short-term and medium-term projects and leave long-term projects to state bodies or bodies close to public authorities.

We will try to explain here the potentially inevitable nature of this observation and under what conditions long-term rates can be
less penalising than short-term ones. This will require us to explain the concept of the ‘equilibrium interest rate’ as a first step.

THE EQUILIBRIUM INTEREST RATE

We are only discussing the risk-free rate here, before taking into account any risk premium. In a context of maximising the inter-temporal well-being of economic agents, the equilibrium interest rate is the rate that enables an agent to choose between an investment (i.e. a diminution of his or her immediate well-being resulting from the reduction of his or her consumption at moment 0 in favour of savings authorising the investment) and a future consumption, the fruit of the investment made.

WE CAN EASILY SHOW THAT TWO COMPONENTS DETERMINE THE EQUILIBRIUM INTEREST RATE:

• economic agents’ rate of preference for the present;
a potential wealth effect that is positive when consumption growth is expected.

The rate of preference for the present (or the impatience rate) is an individual parameter whose value can vary considerably from one individual to another. However, from a macroeconomic point of view, this rate is situated in an intergenerational perspective, which leads us to believe that the value of this parameter should be close to zero. Indeed, no argument can justify prioritising one generation over another.

The wealth effect results from economic growth, enabling economic agents to increase their consumption over time. The prospect of increased consumption encourages economic agents to favour the present and to use a discounting factor that is ever higher the further into the future they look.

In parallel to this potential wealth effect, we also understand that the equilibrium interest rate depends on the characteristics and choices of the agents. They may have a strong preference for spreading their consumption over time, or on the contrary, they may not be averse to possible inequality in the inter-temporal distribution of their consumption.

Technically, once the utility function of the consumers is known (or assumed), it is the degree of curvature of this function that will provide us with the consumers’ R coefficient of aversion to the risk of inter-temporal imbalance in their consumption.

If this coefficient equals 1, this means that the consumer will be ready to reduce his or her consumption by one unit at time 0 in view of benefitting from one additional unit of consumption at time 1. A coefficient of 2 would mean that the consumer is ready to reduce his or her consumption by two units at time 0. It is reasonable to think that R lies somewhere between 1 and 2.

From this perspective, in 1928 Ramsey proposed a simple and illuminating formula for the equilibrium interest rate. Using a power function to measure the consumer’s perceived utility, he showed that the wealth effect in the formation of the equilibrium interest rate was equal to the product of the nominal period growth rate of the economy and the consumer coef ficient of aversion R. This leads to the following relationship:

r = δ + gR

where r is the equilibrium interest rate, δ the impatience rate, g the nominal period growth rate of the economy and R the consumer’s coefficient of aversion to the risk of inter-temporal imbalance in his or her consumption.

Assuming a very low value for δ and a value close to the unit for R, we see that the nominal growth rate of the economy constitutes a reference value for the equilibrium interest rate. This equilibrium interest rate, as explained, is the risk-free rate that must be used to value risk-free assets; if we consider risky assets, we must of course add a risk premium.

In the current context, Ramsey’s relationship makes it possible to appreciate the extent of the effects of unconventional policies put in place by central banks, which have given rise to a risk-free rate close to 0% in the financial markets.

THE LONG-TERM DISCOUNT RATE

Now that we have established the notion of the equilibrium interest rate, we can move on to the question of the structure of discount rates based on their term.

We have just seen that the discount rate is determined by the impatience rate of consumers, their coefficient of aversion R and expectations for the growth rate of the economy. If we consider the impatience rate to be negligible and by assuming that the coefficient of aversion remains unchanged over time, this gives a very important role to the economic outlook: the discount rate based on maturity will mainly reflect the expectations of economic agents in terms of the future growth rate.

Therefore, if we expect economic growth at a constant rate g, the yield-to-maturity curve will be flat. If we expect growth acceleration (growth of the growth rate), the rate structure will grow with the maturity. However, if we expect growth to slow down, the structure of the rates will decrease.

We thus perceive the informative function of the yield-to-maturity curve, which makes it possible to inform the observer of the expectations of financial market operators with regard to expectations of the growth rate of the economy.

WE ALSO SEE THAT THE PENALISATION OF THE LONG-TERM CASH FLOWS BY THE DISCOUNTING PROCESS IS NOT INEVITABLE.

When the economic outlook is trending downwards, the rate structure should be decreasing. But we must not necessarily deduce that this form of the yield curve is synonymous with disaster. It can very easily correspond to a return to normal after a period of over-excitation. For example, coming back to the present, if the growth rate of the economy is particularly high because of catch-up effects, marking a significant gap compared with the sustainable growth rate in the long term, the rate structure should be decreasing and the short-term discount rate higher than the discount rate applicable for a longer time frame.

It is only the action of the central banks, which is particularly noticeable on short maturities, that is preventing such a statistical observation today.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #4 – The Cultural Corner

Does the value of work still mean something

Sophie Chassat
Philosopher, Partner at Wemean

‘When “the practice of one’s profession” cannot be directly linked with the supreme spiritual values of civilisation – and when, conversely, it cannot be experienced subjectively as a simple economic constraint – the individual generally abandons giving it any meaning ’, wrote Max Weber in 1905 at the end of The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism.1 But is this not what we can observe a century later? A world where the value of work seems no longer evident, as if it were ‘endangered’ 2

Big Quit in the USA, the hashtags #quitmyjob, #nodreamjob or #no_labor, communities with millions of followers like the group Antiwork on the social network Reddit: the signals of a form of revolt, or even disgust with work, are multiplying. This is not just a change to work (as might be suggested by remote working or the end of salaried employment as the only employment model), but a much more profound questioning movement – like a refusal to work. This is a far cry from Chaplin’s claim that the model of work is the model of life itself: ‘To work is to live – and I love living!’ 3

In Max Weber’s view, work established itself as a structuring value of society when the Reformation was definitively established in Europe and triumphantly exported to the United States. But the sociologist insisted on one thing: the success of this passion for work can only be explained by the spiritual interest that was linked to it. It is because a life dedicated to labour was the most certain sign of being one of God’s chosen that men gave themselves to it with such zeal. When the ethical value of work was no longer religious, it became social, serving as the index of integration in the community and the recognition of individual accomplishment.

And today? What is the spiritual value of work tied to when the paradigm of (over)production and limitless growth is wobbling, and when ‘helicopter money’ has been raining down for long months? Younger generations, who are challenging the evidence of this work value most vehemently, must lead us to elucidate the meaning of work for the 21st century; studies showing that young people are no longer willing to work at any price are multiplying.

The philosopher Simone Weil, who had worked in a factory, believed in a ‘civilisation of work’, in which work would become ‘the highest value, through its relationship with man who does it [and not] through its relationship with what is produced.’ 4 Make of man the measure of work: that is perhaps where we must start so that tomorrow we can link an ethical aspect to work again – the only one to justify its value. ‘The contemporary form of true greatness lies in a civilization founded on the spirituality of work,’ 5 wrote Weil.

____________

1 Max Weber, L’Éthique protestante et l’esprit du capitalisme [The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism], Flammarion “Champs Classiques”, 2017. Quote translated from the French: « Dès lors que « l’exercice du métier » ne peut pas être directement mis en relation avec les valeurs spirituelles suprêmes de la civilisation – et que, à l’inverse, il ne peut pas être éprouvé subjectivement comme une simple contrainte économique –, l’individu renonce généralement à lui donner un sens. »

2 Dominique Méda, Le Travail ; Une Valeur en voie de disparition ? [Work; an endangered value?], Flammarion “Champs-Essais”, 2010.

3 David Robinson Chaplin: His Life and Art, 2013, Penguin Biography.

4 David Robinson Chaplin: His Life and Art, 2013, PenguTranslated from the French : « la valeur la plus haute, par son rapport avec l’homme qui l’exécute [et non] par son rapport avec ce qu’il produit. »in Biography.

5 Simone Weil, L’Enracinement [The need for Roots], Gallimard, 1949.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #4 – Industry insight

Retail banking, the old guard versus the new

David Chollet
Partner,
Accuracy

Nicolas Darbo
Partner,
Accuracy

Amaury Pouradier Duteil
Partner, Accuracy

Retail banking is a sector that is set to see its rate of transformation accelerate in the next few years. The past 10 years have seen in particular distribution methods evolve towards more digitalisation, without calling into question the physical model, however. In the 10 years to come, in a world where technology will gradually make it possible to serve major needs via platforms, supply, distribution and technological solutions must all evolve.

1. THE TRANSFORMATIONS AT WORK

It is not worth spending too much time explaining the context in which retail banking has been developing for several years now; suffice it to say that there are three principal challenges:
ultra-low rates, regulation that has toughened considerably since 2008 and the arrival of new players.

Beyond this context, the sector is experiencing major technological changes. The first such change regards data. Open banking designates an underlying trend that is pushing banking IT systems to open up and share client data (identity, transaction history, etc.). A new open banking ecosystem is gradually taking shape, in which multiple actors (banks, payment bodies, technology publishers, etc.) share data and incorporate each other’s services in their own interfaces, making it possible to provide new services and to create new tools.

Another major development is banking as a service (BaaS). Historically, retail banking was a fixed-cost industry. The opening up of data, the swing to the cloud and the API-sation of banking systems have made closed and vertically integrated production models redundant. Each of the production building blocks of financial services can now be proposed ‘as a service’. This transformation leads to a swing from a fixed-cost economic model to a variable-cost basis. By outsourcing their banking system, digital challengers can launch their businesses with lower costs and shorter time frames.

Finally, the sector cannot entirely avoid the phenomenon of super-apps, which are gradually changing uses by aggregating services for highly diverging needs. This change may slowly make the way clients are served obsolete and probably requires the development of what we might call ‘embedded finance’.

2. THE FUTURE OF TRADITIONAL PLAYERS

Traditional banks have generally resisted the prevailing winds mentioned above. Over the past 10 years, their revenues have not collapsed, though their growth has proved to be somewhat moderate.

Traditional players still have a certain number of strengths. First, historical banks have complete product ranges, which of course cover daily banking (account, card, packages, etc.), but also the balance sheet side of things, with credit and savings products. Classifying the IT systems of major banks among their strengths may seem rather unconventional. Nevertheless, these large systems, though not agile, are often highly robust, and they have made it possible to shrink the technological gap with neobanks. Finally, traditional players are financially powerful and capable of investing to accelerate a technological plan when necessary.

Naturally, these players have some weaknesses, the main one being the customer experience. However, this point does not relate to the gap with neobanks, which has most often been filled; it relates to the gap with purely technological players for example. When considering the trend of convergence of needs, this weakness may represent something of a handicap for the financial sector as a whole. Another weakness relates to these players’ low margin for manoeuvre in terms of the reduction of headcount or number of agencies, if the implementation of a massive cost-reduction programme proved necessary.

These players are deploying or will have to deploy different types of strategy. First, there are the financial actions, be they concentrating or restructuring. Concentration aims to dispose of all activities away from the bank’s main markets in order to be as large as possible in domestic markets. Restructuring, in Spain in particular but also in France with the business combination between SG and CDN, aims to reduce the break-even point.

Banks should also take other actions. In terms of IT, there will come a time, in the not too distant future, where the lack of agility of historical systems will no longer be compensated by their robustness. Developments will accelerate and the speed of developments will become key.

Finally, traditional players will have to rethink their distribution models in the light of digital technology and the convergence of the service of major types of need, which will enable embedded finance. The idea of embedded finance is to incorporate the subscription of financial products directly into the customer’s consumption or purchase path. The financial service therefore becomes available contextually and digitally.

3. THE FUTURE OF NEOBANKS

Neobanks have developed in successive waves for more than 20 years, and the last wave saw the creation of players developing rapidly and acquiring millions of clients. They are capable of raising colossal funds on the promise of a huge movement of clients towards their model.

The primary strength of neobanks is their technology. Having started from scratch in terms of IT, they have been able to rely on BaaS to develop exactly what they need, all with a good level of customer service.

Moreover, these players generally target precise segments; as a result, they have a perfectly adapted offer and customer path, something that is more difficult for generalist banks.

Their weaknesses are often the corollary of their strengths.

Yes, their limited offer makes it possible to better fulfil certain specific needs, but in a world where technology is enabling the emergence of multi-service platforms, addressing only some of a customer’s financial services needs is not necessarily a good idea. It places neobanks on the periphery of a business line that itself is not best placed in the trend of convergence of needs. But if neobank offers are limited, it is not necessarily by choice.

Developing credit and savings products, areas most often lacking in neobanks, would need them to change size in terms of controls and capital consumption in particular. Finally, the consequence of this limited offer is their inability to capture the most profitable retail banking customers en masse: the customer with multiple accounts. This explains their low revenues, which plateau at €20 per client.

This does not necessarily condemn the future of the neobank. For a start, it is necessary to distinguish between countries based on the availability of banking services. In countries with a low level of banking accessibility, neobanks have an open road before them, like Nubank in Brazil (40 million customers). In countries with a high level of banking accessibility, it is a different story. The low level of revenues and the trend of convergence of major needs will force neobanks to make choices: they can urgently extend their offer to balance sheet products, like Revolut appears to be doing; they can decide to skip the balance sheet step and widen their offer directly to other areas, like Tinkoff is doing in Russia; or they can let themselves be acquired by a traditional player that has an interest in them from a technological perspective – but they should not wait too long to do so.

The retail-banking sector is more than ever under the influence of major transformations. These may be internally generated, like those that touch on data and BaaS, or externally generated, like the development of platforms serving major needs, initially driven by consumer desire for simplification. In this context, traditional players must address two major topics: embedded finance, on the one hand, and potentially the swing towards decidedly more agile systems to stay competitive, on the other. As for neobanks, their offer must be extended to cover balance sheet products urgently, at the risk of losing some agility, or to cover other needs.

But the finance sector as a whole should probably seek to simplify the consumption of its services considerably, faced as it is with non-financial players that have already undertaken this transformation.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #4 – Start-up stories

H2X-Ecosystems

Romain Proglio
Partner, Accuracy

Founded in 2018 in Saint Malo, H2X-Ecosystems provides companies and regional authorities with the opportunity to create complete virtuous ecosystems marrying energy production and decarbonised mobility. These ecosystems enable both the production and the consumpt ion of hydrogen on-site. They are co-built with and for local actors to make the most of their regional resources in order to create added value, whilst maintaining it at the local level. In this way, the ecosystems participate in the development of these rural, periurban or urban areas.

Renewable and low-carbon hydrogen is produced from water electrolysis using renewable energy, which has recently become one of the major levers for decarbonisation. H2X-Ecosystems links this production with typical consumers (buses, refuse collectors, etc.) but also and especially with light mobility and delivery services: self-service cars and last mile delivery. Indeed, the company has made available a hybrid car operating on both solar power and hydrogen, thanks to which on-grid recharge stations are no longer necessary. All this comes without noise pollution or greenhouse gases (CO2, NOx, etc.).

More generally, H2X-Ecosystems is present throughout the hydrogen value chain, from production to storage to consumption: electrolyser, high power electro-hydrogen unit, power pack (fuel cells and removable tanks) able to be incorporated in light mobility solutions.

H2X-Ecosystems has signed a partnership agreement with Enedis Bretagne for the deployment of its high-power electro-hydrogen unit designed to provide a temporary power source to the grid during construction work or in the event of an incident. This unit makes it possible to reduce Enedis’s CO2 emissions and noise pollution by replacing its fossil fuel units with this technology.

In addition, during a period of high pressure on energy prices, the value offer put forward by H2X-Ecosystems enables a move towards control of energy expenditure and energy autonomy for industrial sites by relying in particular on this electro-hydrogen generator combined with other complementary systems (renewable energies, on-site hydrogen production, etc.).

In his presentation of the France 2030 plan, French President Emmanuel Macron confirmed the importance of this sector in the future: ‘We are going to invest almost 2 billion euros to develop green hydrogen. This is a battle that we will lead for ecology, for jobs, and for the sovereignty of our country.’

Relying in particular on nuclear power to perform highly decarbonised electrolysis, France has a leading role to play. H2X-Ecosystems is participating to the full by establishing its first production tools in France, whilst reconciling its development with a virtuous ecological approach that will generate added value, energy independence and profitability for companies and regions.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #4 – One Partner, One View

A new golden age of nuclear power!

René Pigot
Partner, Accuracy

After being weakened by various events and decisions that shed an unfavourable light on it (Fukushima, Flamanville, Fessenheim), the nuclear industry is now enjoying something of a resurgence.

The French president’s recent announcement of a programme to build six EPR2 reactors shows his choice to maintain a base of decarbonised electricity production using nuclear energy.

Though it is a subject of much debate, this decision is born of cold pragmatism: despite their demonstrated large-scale deployment, renewable energies remain subject to the whims of the weather. Alone they will not be able to substitute dispatchable power generation facilities, when considering the ambition behind commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

Faced with the electrification of the economy, the decision to maintain nuclear power in the French energy mix alongside renewable energies is not so much an option as a necessity. The guarantor of balance in the French network, RTE, also recognises this: prospective scenarios with no renewal of the nuclear base depend, in terms of supply security, on significant technological and societal advances – a high-stakes gamble to say the least. Beyond these aspects, nuclear power also constitutes an obvious vector of energy independence for Europeans. Current affairs cruelly remind us of this, and the situation could almost have led to a change in the German position, if we look at the latest declarations of their government.

In France, initial estimations put construction costs at €52bn, but financing mechanisms are yet to be defined. The only certainty is that state backing will be essential to guarantee a competitive final price of electricity, given the scale of the investments and the risks weighing on the project. Ultimately, the financial engineering for the project will need to be imaginative in order to align the interests of the state, EDF and the consumers.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #4

For our fourth edition of the Accuracy Talks Straight, René Pigot discusses about the nuclear industry, before letting Romain Proglio introduce us to H2X-Ecosystems, a start-up that enable both the production and the consumpt ion of hydrogen on-site. We then analyse the development of the retail baking with David Chollet, Nicolas Darbo and Amaury Pouradier Duteil.
Sophie Chassat, Philosopher and partner at Wemean, explores the value of work. And finally, we look closer at the long-term discount rate with Philippe Raimbourg, Director of the Ecole de Management de la Sorbonne and Affiliate professor at ESCP Business School, as well as the improvement of the economic panorama with Hervé Goulletquer, our senior economic adviser.


SUMMARY


A new golden age of nuclear power!

René Pigot
Partner, Accuracy

After being weakened by various events and decisions that shed an unfavourable light on it (Fukushima, Flamanville, Fessenheim), the nuclear industry is now enjoying something of a resurgence.

The French president’s recent announcement of a programme to build six EPR2 reactors shows his choice to maintain a base of decarbonised electricity production using nuclear energy.

Though it is a subject of much debate, this decision is born of cold pragmatism: despite their demonstrated large-scale deployment, renewable energies remain subject to the whims of the weather. Alone they will not be able to substitute dispatchable power generation facilities, when considering the ambition behind commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

Faced with the electrification of the economy, the decision to maintain nuclear power in the French energy mix alongside renewable energies is not so much an option as a necessity. The guarantor of balance in the French network, RTE, also recognises this: prospective scenarios with no renewal of the nuclear base depend, in terms of supply security, on significant technological and societal advances – a high-stakes gamble to say the least. Beyond these aspects, nuclear power also constitutes an obvious vector of energy independence for Europeans. Current affairs cruelly remind us of this, and the situation could almost have led to a change in the German position, if we look at the latest declarations of their government.

In France, initial estimations put construction costs at €52bn, but financing mechanisms are yet to be defined. The only certainty is that state backing will be essential to guarantee a competitive final price of electricity, given the scale of the investments and the risks weighing on the project. Ultimately, the financial engineering for the project will need to be imaginative in order to align the interests of the state, EDF and the consumers.


H2X-Ecosystems

Romain Proglio
Partner, Accuracy

Founded in 2018 in Saint Malo, H2X-Ecosystems provides companies and regional authorities with the opportunity to create complete virtuous ecosystems marrying energy production and decarbonised mobility. These ecosystems enable both the production and the consumpt ion of hydrogen on-site. They are co-built with and for local actors to make the most of their regional resources in order to create added value, whilst maintaining it at the local level. In this way, the ecosystems participate in the development of these rural, periurban or urban areas.

Renewable and low-carbon hydrogen is produced from water electrolysis using renewable energy, which has recently become one of the major levers for decarbonisation. H2X-Ecosystems links this production with typical consumers (buses, refuse collectors, etc.) but also and especially with light mobility and delivery services: self-service cars and last mile delivery. Indeed, the company has made available a hybrid car operating on both solar power and hydrogen, thanks to which on-grid recharge stations are no longer necessary. All this comes without noise pollution or greenhouse gases (CO2, NOx, etc.).

More generally, H2X-Ecosystems is present throughout the hydrogen value chain, from production to storage to consumption: electrolyser, high power electro-hydrogen unit, power pack (fuel cells and removable tanks) able to be incorporated in light mobility solutions.

H2X-Ecosystems has signed a partnership agreement with Enedis Bretagne for the deployment of its high-power electro-hydrogen unit designed to provide a temporary power source to the grid during construction work or in the event of an incident. This unit makes it possible to reduce Enedis’s CO2 emissions and noise pollution by replacing its fossil fuel units with this technology.

In addition, during a period of high pressure on energy prices, the value offer put forward by H2X-Ecosystems enables a move towards control of energy expenditure and energy autonomy for industrial sites by relying in particular on this electro-hydrogen generator combined with other complementary systems (renewable energies, on-site hydrogen production, etc.).

In his presentation of the France 2030 plan, French President Emmanuel Macron confirmed the importance of this sector in the future: ‘We are going to invest almost 2 billion euros to develop green hydrogen. This is a battle that we will lead for ecology, for jobs, and for the sovereignty of our country.’

Relying in particular on nuclear power to perform highly decarbonised electrolysis, France has a leading role to play. H2X-Ecosystems is participating to the full by establishing its first production tools in France, whilst reconciling its development with a virtuous ecological approach that will generate added value, energy independence and profitability for companies and regions.


Retail banking, the old guard versus the new

David Chollet
Partner,
Accuracy

Nicolas Darbo
Partner,
Accuracy

Amaury Pouradier Duteil
Partner, Accuracy

Retail banking is a sector that is set to see its rate of transformation accelerate in the next few years. The past 10 years have seen in particular distribution methods evolve towards more digitalisation, without calling into question the physical model, however. In the 10 years to come, in a world where technology will gradually make it possible to serve major needs via platforms, supply, distribution and technological solutions must all evolve.

1. THE TRANSFORMATIONS AT WORK

It is not worth spending too much time explaining the context in which retail banking has been developing for several years now; suffice it to say that there are three principal challenges:
ultra-low rates, regulation that has toughened considerably since 2008 and the arrival of new players.

Beyond this context, the sector is experiencing major technological changes. The first such change regards data. Open banking designates an underlying trend that is pushing banking IT systems to open up and share client data (identity, transaction history, etc.). A new open banking ecosystem is gradually taking shape, in which multiple actors (banks, payment bodies, technology publishers, etc.) share data and incorporate each other’s services in their own interfaces, making it possible to provide new services and to create new tools.

Another major development is banking as a service (BaaS). Historically, retail banking was a fixed-cost industry. The opening up of data, the swing to the cloud and the API-sation of banking systems have made closed and vertically integrated production models redundant. Each of the production building blocks of financial services can now be proposed ‘as a service’. This transformation leads to a swing from a fixed-cost economic model to a variable-cost basis. By outsourcing their banking system, digital challengers can launch their businesses with lower costs and shorter time frames.

Finally, the sector cannot entirely avoid the phenomenon of super-apps, which are gradually changing uses by aggregating services for highly diverging needs. This change may slowly make the way clients are served obsolete and probably requires the development of what we might call ‘embedded finance’.

2. THE FUTURE OF TRADITIONAL PLAYERS

Traditional banks have generally resisted the prevailing winds mentioned above. Over the past 10 years, their revenues have not collapsed, though their growth has proved to be somewhat moderate.

Traditional players still have a certain number of strengths. First, historical banks have complete product ranges, which of course cover daily banking (account, card, packages, etc.), but also the balance sheet side of things, with credit and savings products. Classifying the IT systems of major banks among their strengths may seem rather unconventional. Nevertheless, these large systems, though not agile, are often highly robust, and they have made it possible to shrink the technological gap with neobanks. Finally, traditional players are financially powerful and capable of investing to accelerate a technological plan when necessary.

Naturally, these players have some weaknesses, the main one being the customer experience. However, this point does not relate to the gap with neobanks, which has most often been filled; it relates to the gap with purely technological players for example. When considering the trend of convergence of needs, this weakness may represent something of a handicap for the financial sector as a whole. Another weakness relates to these players’ low margin for manoeuvre in terms of the reduction of headcount or number of agencies, if the implementation of a massive cost-reduction programme proved necessary.

These players are deploying or will have to deploy different types of strategy. First, there are the financial actions, be they concentrating or restructuring. Concentration aims to dispose of all activities away from the bank’s main markets in order to be as large as possible in domestic markets. Restructuring, in Spain in particular but also in France with the business combination between SG and CDN, aims to reduce the break-even point.

Banks should also take other actions. In terms of IT, there will come a time, in the not too distant future, where the lack of agility of historical systems will no longer be compensated by their robustness. Developments will accelerate and the speed of developments will become key.

Finally, traditional players will have to rethink their distribution models in the light of digital technology and the convergence of the service of major types of need, which will enable embedded finance. The idea of embedded finance is to incorporate the subscription of financial products directly into the customer’s consumption or purchase path. The financial service therefore becomes available contextually and digitally.

3. THE FUTURE OF NEOBANKS

Neobanks have developed in successive waves for more than 20 years, and the last wave saw the creation of players developing rapidly and acquiring millions of clients. They are capable of raising colossal funds on the promise of a huge movement of clients towards their model.

The primary strength of neobanks is their technology. Having started from scratch in terms of IT, they have been able to rely on BaaS to develop exactly what they need, all with a good level of customer service.

Moreover, these players generally target precise segments; as a result, they have a perfectly adapted offer and customer path, something that is more difficult for generalist banks.

Their weaknesses are often the corollary of their strengths.

Yes, their limited offer makes it possible to better fulfil certain specific needs, but in a world where technology is enabling the emergence of multi-service platforms, addressing only some of a customer’s financial services needs is not necessarily a good idea. It places neobanks on the periphery of a business line that itself is not best placed in the trend of convergence of needs. But if neobank offers are limited, it is not necessarily by choice.

Developing credit and savings products, areas most often lacking in neobanks, would need them to change size in terms of controls and capital consumption in particular. Finally, the consequence of this limited offer is their inability to capture the most profitable retail banking customers en masse: the customer with multiple accounts. This explains their low revenues, which plateau at €20 per client.

This does not necessarily condemn the future of the neobank. For a start, it is necessary to distinguish between countries based on the availability of banking services. In countries with a low level of banking accessibility, neobanks have an open road before them, like Nubank in Brazil (40 million customers). In countries with a high level of banking accessibility, it is a different story. The low level of revenues and the trend of convergence of major needs will force neobanks to make choices: they can urgently extend their offer to balance sheet products, like Revolut appears to be doing; they can decide to skip the balance sheet step and widen their offer directly to other areas, like Tinkoff is doing in Russia; or they can let themselves be acquired by a traditional player that has an interest in them from a technological perspective – but they should not wait too long to do so.

The retail-banking sector is more than ever under the influence of major transformations. These may be internally generated, like those that touch on data and BaaS, or externally generated, like the development of platforms serving major needs, initially driven by consumer desire for simplification. In this context, traditional players must address two major topics: embedded finance, on the one hand, and potentially the swing towards decidedly more agile systems to stay competitive, on the other. As for neobanks, their offer must be extended to cover balance sheet products urgently, at the risk of losing some agility, or to cover other needs.

But the finance sector as a whole should probably seek to simplify the consumption of its services considerably, faced as it is with non-financial players that have already undertaken this transformation.


Does the value of work still mean something

Sophie Chassat
Philosopher, Partner at Wemean

‘When “the practice of one’s profession” cannot be directly linked with the supreme spiritual values of civilisation – and when, conversely, it cannot be experienced subjectively as a simple economic constraint – the individual generally abandons giving it any meaning ’, wrote Max Weber in 1905 at the end of The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism.1 But is this not what we can observe a century later? A world where the value of work seems no longer evident, as if it were ‘endangered’ 2

Big Quit in the USA, the hashtags #quitmyjob, #nodreamjob or #no_labor, communities with millions of followers like the group Antiwork on the social network Reddit: the signals of a form of revolt, or even disgust with work, are multiplying. This is not just a change to work (as might be suggested by remote working or the end of salaried employment as the only employment model), but a much more profound questioning movement – like a refusal to work. This is a far cry from Chaplin’s claim that the model of work is the model of life itself: ‘To work is to live – and I love living!’ 3

In Max Weber’s view, work established itself as a structuring value of society when the Reformation was definitively established in Europe and triumphantly exported to the United States. But the sociologist insisted on one thing: the success of this passion for work can only be explained by the spiritual interest that was linked to it. It is because a life dedicated to labour was the most certain sign of being one of God’s chosen that men gave themselves to it with such zeal. When the ethical value of work was no longer religious, it became social, serving as the index of integration in the community and the recognition of individual accomplishment.

And today? What is the spiritual value of work tied to when the paradigm of (over)production and limitless growth is wobbling, and when ‘helicopter money’ has been raining down for long months? Younger generations, who are challenging the evidence of this work value most vehemently, must lead us to elucidate the meaning of work for the 21st century; studies showing that young people are no longer willing to work at any price are multiplying.

The philosopher Simone Weil, who had worked in a factory, believed in a ‘civilisation of work’, in which work would become ‘the highest value, through its relationship with man who does it [and not] through its relationship with what is produced.’ 4 Make of man the measure of work: that is perhaps where we must start so that tomorrow we can link an ethical aspect to work again – the only one to justify its value. ‘The contemporary form of true greatness lies in a civilization founded on the spirituality of work,’ 5 wrote Weil.

____________

1 Max Weber, L’Éthique protestante et l’esprit du capitalisme [The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism], Flammarion “Champs Classiques”, 2017. Quote translated from the French: « Dès lors que « l’exercice du métier » ne peut pas être directement mis en relation avec les valeurs spirituelles suprêmes de la civilisation – et que, à l’inverse, il ne peut pas être éprouvé subjectivement comme une simple contrainte économique –, l’individu renonce généralement à lui donner un sens. »

2 Dominique Méda, Le Travail ; Une Valeur en voie de disparition ? [Work; an endangered value?], Flammarion “Champs-Essais”, 2010.

3 David Robinson Chaplin: His Life and Art, 2013, Penguin Biography.

4 David Robinson Chaplin: His Life and Art, 2013, PenguTranslated from the French : « la valeur la plus haute, par son rapport avec l’homme qui l’exécute [et non] par son rapport avec ce qu’il produit. »in Biography.

5 Simone Weil, L’Enracinement [The need for Roots], Gallimard, 1949.


The long-term discount rate

Philippe Raimbourg
Director of the Ecole de Management de la Sorbonne (Université Panthéon-Sorbonne)
Affiliate professor at ESCP Business School

If since Irving Fisher we know that the value of an asset equals the discounted value of the cash flows that it can generate, we also know that the discounting process significantly erodes the value of long-term cash flows and reduces the attractiveness of long-term projects.

THIS RESULT IS THE CONSEQUENCE OF A DUAL PHENOMENON:

the passage of time, which automatically whittles down the present value of all remote cash flows;
the shape of the yield-to-maturity curve, which generally leads to the use of higher discount rates the further in the future the cash flows are due; indeed, we usually observe that the yield curve increases with the maturity of the cash flow considered.

THE DISCOUNTING PROCESS SIGNIFICANTLY ERODES THE VALUE OF LONG-TERM CASH FLOWS

For this reason, the majority of companies generally invest in short-term and medium-term projects and leave long-term projects to state bodies or bodies close to public authorities.

We will try to explain here the potentially inevitable nature of this observation and under what conditions long-term rates can be
less penalising than short-term ones. This will require us to explain the concept of the ‘equilibrium interest rate’ as a first step.

THE EQUILIBRIUM INTEREST RATE

We are only discussing the risk-free rate here, before taking into account any risk premium. In a context of maximising the inter-temporal well-being of economic agents, the equilibrium interest rate is the rate that enables an agent to choose between an investment (i.e. a diminution of his or her immediate well-being resulting from the reduction of his or her consumption at moment 0 in favour of savings authorising the investment) and a future consumption, the fruit of the investment made.

WE CAN EASILY SHOW THAT TWO COMPONENTS DETERMINE THE EQUILIBRIUM INTEREST RATE:

• economic agents’ rate of preference for the present;
a potential wealth effect that is positive when consumption growth is expected.

The rate of preference for the present (or the impatience rate) is an individual parameter whose value can vary considerably from one individual to another. However, from a macroeconomic point of view, this rate is situated in an intergenerational perspective, which leads us to believe that the value of this parameter should be close to zero. Indeed, no argument can justify prioritising one generation over another.

The wealth effect results from economic growth, enabling economic agents to increase their consumption over time. The prospect of increased consumption encourages economic agents to favour the present and to use a discounting factor that is ever higher the further into the future they look.

In parallel to this potential wealth effect, we also understand that the equilibrium interest rate depends on the characteristics and choices of the agents. They may have a strong preference for spreading their consumption over time, or on the contrary, they may not be averse to possible inequality in the inter-temporal distribution of their consumption.

Technically, once the utility function of the consumers is known (or assumed), it is the degree of curvature of this function that will provide us with the consumers’ R coefficient of aversion to the risk of inter-temporal imbalance in their consumption.

If this coefficient equals 1, this means that the consumer will be ready to reduce his or her consumption by one unit at time 0 in view of benefitting from one additional unit of consumption at time 1. A coefficient of 2 would mean that the consumer is ready to reduce his or her consumption by two units at time 0. It is reasonable to think that R lies somewhere between 1 and 2.

From this perspective, in 1928 Ramsey proposed a simple and illuminating formula for the equilibrium interest rate. Using a power function to measure the consumer’s perceived utility, he showed that the wealth effect in the formation of the equilibrium interest rate was equal to the product of the nominal period growth rate of the economy and the consumer coef ficient of aversion R. This leads to the following relationship:

r = δ + gR

where r is the equilibrium interest rate, δ the impatience rate, g the nominal period growth rate of the economy and R the consumer’s coefficient of aversion to the risk of inter-temporal imbalance in his or her consumption.

Assuming a very low value for δ and a value close to the unit for R, we see that the nominal growth rate of the economy constitutes a reference value for the equilibrium interest rate. This equilibrium interest rate, as explained, is the risk-free rate that must be used to value risk-free assets; if we consider risky assets, we must of course add a risk premium.

In the current context, Ramsey’s relationship makes it possible to appreciate the extent of the effects of unconventional policies put in place by central banks, which have given rise to a risk-free rate close to 0% in the financial markets.

THE LONG-TERM DISCOUNT RATE

Now that we have established the notion of the equilibrium interest rate, we can move on to the question of the structure of discount rates based on their term.

We have just seen that the discount rate is determined by the impatience rate of consumers, their coefficient of aversion R and expectations for the growth rate of the economy. If we consider the impatience rate to be negligible and by assuming that the coefficient of aversion remains unchanged over time, this gives a very important role to the economic outlook: the discount rate based on maturity will mainly reflect the expectations of economic agents in terms of the future growth rate.

Therefore, if we expect economic growth at a constant rate g, the yield-to-maturity curve will be flat. If we expect growth acceleration (growth of the growth rate), the rate structure will grow with the maturity. However, if we expect growth to slow down, the structure of the rates will decrease.

We thus perceive the informative function of the yield-to-maturity curve, which makes it possible to inform the observer of the expectations of financial market operators with regard to expectations of the growth rate of the economy.

WE ALSO SEE THAT THE PENALISATION OF THE LONG-TERM CASH FLOWS BY THE DISCOUNTING PROCESS IS NOT INEVITABLE.

When the economic outlook is trending downwards, the rate structure should be decreasing. But we must not necessarily deduce that this form of the yield curve is synonymous with disaster. It can very easily correspond to a return to normal after a period of over-excitation. For example, coming back to the present, if the growth rate of the economy is particularly high because of catch-up effects, marking a significant gap compared with the sustainable growth rate in the long term, the rate structure should be decreasing and the short-term discount rate higher than the discount rate applicable for a longer time frame.

It is only the action of the central banks, which is particularly noticeable on short maturities, that is preventing such a statistical observation today.


When improvement does not necessarily rhyme with simplification

Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Advisor, Accuracy

Today, though this statement may apply more to developed countries than to developing countries, the economic landscape appears on the surface more promising. COVID-19 is on the verge of transforming from epidemic into endemic. Economic recovery is considered likely to last, and the delay to growth accumulated during the COVID-19 crisis has mostly been caught up. Last but not least, prices are accelerating.

This last phenomenon is quite spectacular, with a year-on-year change in consumer prices passing in the space of two years (from early 2020 to early 2022) from 1.9% to 7.5% in the United States and from 1.4% to 5.1% in the eurozone. What’s more, this acceleration is proving stronger and lasting longer than the idea we had of the consequences on the price profile of opening up an economy previously hindered by public health measures.

Faced with these dynamics on the dual front of health and the real economy, opinions on the initiatives to be taken by central banks have changed. The capital markets are calling for the rapid normalisation of monetary policies: stopping the increase in the size of balance sheets and then reducing them, as well as returning the reference rates to levels deemed more normal. This, of course, comes with the creation of both upward pressure and distortions in the rate curves, as well as a loss of direction in the equity markets.

At this stage, let’s have a quick look back to see how far we may have to go. During the epidemic crisis, the main Western central banks (the Fed in the US, the ECB in the eurozone, the Bank of Japan and the Bank of England) accepted a remarkable increase in the size of their balance sheets. For these four banks alone, the balance sheet/GDP ratio went from 36% at the beginning of 2020 to 60% at the end of 2021. This is the counterpart to the bonds bought and the liquidity injected in their respective banking systems. At the same time, the reference rates were positioned or maintained as low as possible (based on the economic and financial characteristics of each country or zone): at +0.25% in the US, at -0.50% in the eurozone, at -0.10% in Japan and at +0.10% in the UK. This pair of initiatives served to ensure the most favourable monetary and financial conditions. They ‘supplemented’ the actions taken by the public authorities: often state-backed loans granted to businesses and furlough measures in parallel to significant support to the economy (around 4.5 points of GDP on average for the OECD zone; note, the two types of measure may partly overlap).

Now, let’s try to set out the monetary policy debate. The net rebound of economic growth in 2021, the widely shared feeling that economic activity will continue following an upward trend, and price developments that are struggling to get back into line all contribute to a situation that justifies the beginning of monetary policy normalisation. It goes without saying that the timing and the rhythm of this normalisation depend on conditions specific to each geography.

HOWEVER, WE MUST BE AWARE OF THE SINGULAR NATURE OF THE CURRENT SITUATION.

The current inflationary dynamics are not primarily the reflection of excessively strong demand stumbling over a supply side already at full capacity.

More so, they reflect – and quite considerably – production and distribution apparatuses that cannot operate at an optimal rhythm because of the disorganisation caused by the epidemic and sometimes by the effects brought about by public policies. The return to normal – and if possible quickly – is a necessity, unless we are willing to accept lasting losses of supply capacity. With this in mind, we must be careful not to speed down the road to monetary neutrality; otherwise, we risk a loss of momentum in economic growth and a sharp decline in financial markets, both of which would lead us away from the desired goal.

Another point must be mentioned, even if it is more classic in nature: the acceleration of consumer prices is not without incident on households. It gnaws away at their purchasing power and acts negatively on their confidence, both things that serve to slow down private consumption and therefore economic activity.

THIS IS ANOTHER ELEMENT SUPPORTING THE GRADUAL NORMALISATION OF MONETARY POLICY.

How do the two ‘major’ central banks (the Fed in the US and the ECB in the eurozone) go about charting their course on this path, marked out on the one hand by the impatience of the capital markets and on the other by the need to take account of the singularity of the moment and the dexterity that this singularity requires when conducting monetary policy?

All we can do is observe a certain ‘crab walk’ by the Fed and the ECB. Let’s explain and start with the US central bank.

The key phrase of the communiqué at the end of the recent monetary policy committee of 26 January is without doubt the following: ‘With inflation well above 2 percent and a strong labor market, the Committee expects it will soon be appropriate to raise the target range for the federal funds rate.’ Not surprisingly, the reference rate was raised by 25 percentage points on 16 March, and as there is no forward guidance, the rhythm of the monetary normalisation will be data dependent (based on the image of the economy drawn by the most recently published economic indicators). At first, the focus will be on the price profile; then, the importance of the activity profile will grow.

The market, with its perception of growth and inflation, will be quick to anticipate a rapid pace of policy rate increases. The Fed, having approved the start of the movement, is trying to control its tempo. Not the easiest of tasks!

Let’s move on to the ECB. The market retained two things from the meeting of the Council of Governors on 3 February: risks regarding future inflation developments are on the rise and the possibility of a policy rate increase as early as this year cannot be ruled out.

Of course, the analysis put forward at the time was more balanced, and since then, Christine Lagarde and certain other members of the Council, such as François Villeroy de Galhau, have been working to moderate market expectations that are doubtlessly considered excessive.

We can see it clearly. It will all be a question of timing and good pacing in this incipient period of normalisation. In medio stat virtus1 , as Aristotle reminds us. But how establishing it can be difficult!

____________

1 Virtue lies in a just middle.

IMPACT OF THE RUSSIAN INVASION OF UKRAINE:
NECESSARY DOWNWARD REVISION OF ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT

The world outside Russia, especially Europe, will not get through the crisis unscathed. The continued acceleration of prices and the fall in confidence are the principal reasons for this. Indeed, the price of crude oil has increased by over 30% (+35 dollars per barrel) since the beginning of military operations, and the price of ‘European’ gas has almost doubled. In the same way, it is impossible to extrapolate the rebound in the PMI indices of many countries in February; they are practically ancient history. Growth will slow down and inflation will become more intense, with the United States suffering less than the eurozone.

Vigilance (caution) may need to be even greater. This new shock (the scale of which remains unknown) is rattling an economic system that is still in recovery: the epidemic is being followed by a difficult rebalancing of supply and demand, creating an unusual upward trend in prices compared with the past few decades. Is the economic system’s resistance weaker as a result?

• In these conditions, monetary normalisation will be more gradual than anticipated. Central banks should monitor the increase in energy (and also food) prices and focus more on price dynamics excluding these two components – what we call the ‘core’. The most likely assumption is that this core will experience a slower tempo, above all because of less well-orientated demand.

Read the third edition of Accuracy Talks Straight >

Accuracy Talks Straight #4 – Regard sur l’économie

Quand amélioration ne rime pas forcément avec simplification

Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Advisor, Accuracy

Aujourd’hui, même si l’affirmation vaut plus pour les pays développés que pour les émergents, le panorama économique est a priori plus favorable. L’épidémie est en passe de se transformer en endémie, la reprise économique est considérée comme devant être durable, avec un retard de croissance accumulé durant la crise de la COVID le plus souvent comblé, et, dernier point et non des moindres, les prix accélèrent.

Ce dernier mouvement est même spectaculaire, avec un glissement sur un an des prix à la consommation, passé respectivement en l’espace de deux ans (du début 2020 au début 2022) de 1,9% à 7,5% aux Etats-Unis et de 1,4% à 5,1% en Zone Euro. Qui plus est cette accélération est plus forte et dure plus longtemps que l’idée qu’on se faisait des implications de la réouverture d’une économie, préalablement entravée par les mesures prises de santé publique, sur le profil des prix.

Face à ces dynamiques sur le double front sanitaire et de l’économie réelle, les regards jetés sur les initiatives à prendre par les banques centrales ont évolué. Les marchés de capitaux réclament une normalisation rapide des politiques monétaires : arrêt de la hausse, puis réduction, de la taille des bilans et retour des taux directeurs vers des niveaux jugés plus normaux. Ce qui ne va pas sans créer tant des pressions haussières et des déformations des courbes des taux que de pertes de repères sur les marchés d’actions.

Faisons à ce stade un petit rappel, pour prendre la mesure du chemin à éventuellement parcourir. Durant la crise épidémique, les principales banques centrales occidentales (Fed américaine, BCE en Zone Euro, Banque du Japon et Banque d’Angleterre) ont accepté de gonfler de façon spectaculaire la taille de leur bilan. A elles-quatre, le ratio bilan/PIB est passé de 36% au début de 2020 à 60% à la fin de 2021. Il s’agit de la contrepartie des obligations achetées et des liquidités injectées dans les systèmes bancaires respectifs. Dans le même temps, les taux directeurs ont été positionnés ou maintenus le plus bas possible (en fonction des caractéristiques économiques et financières propres à chaque pays ou zone) : à +0,25% aux Etats-Unis, à -0,50% en Zone Euro, à-0,10% au Japon et à +0,10% au Royaume-Uni. Ce couple d’initiatives répondait à l’ambition d’assurer les conditions monétaires et financières les plus favorables. Il a « complémenté » les actions prises par les administrations publiques : souvent des prêts garantis aux entreprises et des mesures de chômages techniques en parallèle d’un soutien important à l’économie (de l’ordre de 4,5 points de PIB en moyenne pour la zone OCDE ; attention les deux types de mesures peuvent en partie se recouper).

Essayons maintenant de poser le débat de politique monétaire. Le net rebond de la croissance économique en 2021, le sentiment largement partagé que l’activité se maintiendra sur une tendance haussière et une évolution des prix qui a du mal à rentrer dans le rang forment un tout qui justifie de démarrer le processus de normalisation du réglage monétaire. Bien sûr, le calendrier et le rythme dépendent des conditions propres à chaque géographie.

IL FAUT TOUTEFOIS AVOIR CONSCIENCE DU CARACTÈRE « ORIGINAL » DE LA SITUATION ACTUELLE.

La dynamique inflationniste du moment n’est pas avant tout le reflet d’une demande trop forte, qui viendrait buter sur des capacités d’offre pleinement utilisées. Elle traduit plutôt, et pour beaucoup, des appareils de production et de distribution qui ne peuvent fonctionner à un régime optimal, à cause de la désorganisation induite par la crise épidémique et parfois aussi par les réponses apportées par les politiques publiques. Ce retour à la normale, si possible rapidement, est une nécessité ; sauf à accepter des pertes durables de capacités d’offre. A ce titre, il faut être attentif à ce que le chemin vers la neutralité monétaire ne soit pas emprunté avec une « vitesse » excessive. Au risque sinon d’une perte de portance de la croissance économique et d’un brusque décrochage des marchés financiers, qui feraient l’un et l’autre s’éloigner du but recherché.

Un autre point, même s’il est d’une facture plus classique, doit être mentionné. L’accélération des prix à la consommation n’est pas sans incidence sur les ménages. Elle grignote leur pouvoir d’achat et agit négativement sur leur confiance ; toutes choses qui militent en faveur d’un ralentissement de la consommation privée et, par-delà, de l’activité économique.

IL Y A ICI UN ÉLÉMENT SUPPLÉMENTAIRE EN FAVEUR DU GRADUALISME DANS LA CONDUITE DE CE PROCESSUS DE NORMALISATION MONÉTAIRE.

Comment les deux « grandes » banques centrales, que sont la Fed américaine et la BCE européenne, s’y prennent-elles pour tracer leur chemin sur cette piste, balisée d’un côté par l’impatience des marchés de capitaux et de l’autre par la nécessaire prise en compte du caractère original du moment présent et du doigté que cela implique dans la conduite de la politique monétaire ?

Il reste alors à observer une certaine « marche en crabe » de la Fed et de la BCE. Expliquons-nous et commençons par la banque centrale américaine. La phrase-clé du communiqué publié au sortir du plus récent comité de politique monétaire du 26 janvier est sans doute la suivante : « Avec l’inflation bien supérieur à 2 % et un marché du travail vigoureux, le comité s’attend à ce qu’il soit bientôt approprié de relever la fourchette cible du taux des fonds fédéraux ». Sans surprise, le taux directeur a bien été relevé de 25 centimes le 16 mars, et comme il n’y a plus de forward guidance (guidage prospectif), le rythme de la normalisation monétaire sera data dependent (calé sur l’image de l’économie dessinée par les indicateurs conjoncturels les plus récemment publiés). Dans un tout premier temps, l’attention portera prioritairement sur le profil des prix. Puis, l’importance accordée au profil de l’activité ira croissante.

Le marché, avec l’idée qu’il se fait de la croissance et de l’inflation, est prompt à anticiper un rythme rapide de remontée du taux directeur. La Fed, après avoir donné son aval à l’initialisation du mouvement, tente d’en contrôler le tempo. Ce qui n’est pas très facile !

Passons à la BCE. Le marché a retenu deux choses de la réunion du Conseil des gouverneurs du 3 février : les risques concernant les évolutions à venir de l’inflation sont orientés à la hausse et la possibilité d’une hausse du taux directeur dès cette année n’est pas écartée.

Bien sûr, l’analyse proposée était davantage balancée et depuis tant Christine Lagarde que certains autres membres du Conseil, comme François Villeroy de Galhau, s’emploient à modérer des anticipations de marché sans doute considérées comme excessives.

On le perçoit bien ; tout va être question de bon calendrier et de bon rythme dans cet exercice de normalisation qui démarre. In medio stat virtus, nous rappelle Aristote. Mais oh combien la déclinaison peut être difficile !

IMPACT DE L’INVASION DE L’UKRAINE PAR LA RUSSIE :
NÉCESSAIRE RÉVISION DU DIAGNOSTIC CONJONCTUREL DANS UN SENS MOINS FAVORABLE


Le monde hors Russie, singulièrement l’Europe, ne « passera pas entre les gouttes ». La poursuite de l’accélération des prix et un repli de la confiance en sont les ingrédients principaux. Ainsi, le prix du pétrole brut a augmenté de plus de 30% (+35 dollars par baril) depuis le début des opérations militaires et celui du gaz « européen » a presque doublé. De même, il n’est pas possible d’extrapoler le rebond des indices PMI de beaucoup de pays en février ; ce n’est plus que de l’histoire ancienne. La croissance va ralentir et l’inflation se faire plus vive ; avec des Etats-Unis moins pénalisés que la Zone Euro.

Il est possible que la vigilance (la prudence) doive être encore plus grande. Ce nouveau choc (dont l’ampleur n’est pas encore connu) vient ébranler un système économique toujours convalescent : la crise épidémique, suivie d’un difficile rééquilibrage offre –demande qui crée une dynamique haussière des prix inusitée si on prend comme référence les décennies les plus récentes. Sa résistance est-elle plus faible à ce titre ?

• Dans ces conditions, la normalisation monétaire se fera plus graduelle qu’anticipée. Les banques centrales devraient « enjamber » le renchérissement des produits énergétiques (et aussi alimentaires) et se focaliser davantage sur la dynamique des prix hors ces deux composantes ; ce qu’on appelle le noyau dur. L’hypothèse la plus probable est que celui-ci connaisse un tempo moins marqué qu’escompté ; avant tout du fait d’une demande moins bien orientée.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #4 – L’angle académique

Le taux d’actualisation de long terme

Philippe Raimbourg
Directeur de l’Ecole de Management de la Sorbonne (Université Panthéon-Sorbonne)
Professeur affilié à ESCP Business School

Si depuis Irving Fisher, on sait que la valeur d’un actif se confond avec la valeur actualisée des flux financiers qu’il est susceptible de générer, on sait aussi que le processus d’actualisation érode fortement les flux de long terme et réduit d’autant l’attrait des projets de maturité importante.

CE RÉSULTAT EST LA CONSÉQUENCE D’UN DOUBLE PHÉNOMÈNE :

le passage du temps qui, mécaniquement, rabote la valeur actuelle de tous les flux éloignés,
• mais aussi, la forme de la structure des taux selon le terme qui conduit généralement à retenir des taux d’actualisation d’autant plus élevés que leur échéance est lointaine ; on constate en effet, habituellement, que la yield curve est croissante avec la maturité du flux considéré.

LE PROCESSUS D’ACTUALISATION ÉRODE FORTEMENT LES FLUX DE LONG TERME

Pour cela, la majorité des entreprises investissent généralement dans des projets de court et moyen terme et laissent les projets de long terme à des organismes étatiques ou proches des Pouvoirs Publics. On cherchera ici à préciser l’éventuel caractère inéluctable de ce constat et sous quelles conditions les taux de long terme peuvent être moins pénalisants que ceux de court terme. Cela nous amènera dans un premier temps à préciser la notion de « taux d’actualisation d’équilibre ».

LE TAUX D’ACTUALISATION D’ÉQUILIBRE

On ne traite ici que du taux sans risque, avant prise en compte d’une éventuelle prime de risque. Dans un contexte de maximisation du bien-être inter-temporel des agents économiques, le taux d’actualisation d’équilibre est celui qui permet à un agent de choisir entre un investissement (c’est-à-dire une diminution de son bien-être immédiat résultant d’une réduction de sa consommation au temps 0 au profit d’une épargne autorisant l’investissement) et une consommation future, fruit de l’investissement réalisé.

ON MONTRE AISÉMENT QUE DEUX COMPOSANTES DÉTERMINENT LE TAUX D’ACTUALISATION D’ÉQUILIBRE :

le taux de préférence pour le présent des agents économiques ;
un éventuel effet-richesse qui est positif lorsqu’une croissance de la consommation est attendue.

Le taux de préférence pour le présent (ou encore, taux d’impatience) est un paramètre individuel dont la valeur peut fortement varier d’un individu à l’autre. Cependant, envisagé d’un point de vue macroéconomique, ce taux se situe dans une perspective intergénérationnelle qui nous incite à penser que la valeur de ce paramètre doit être proche de zéro. Aucun argument ne peut en effet justifier que l’on favorise une génération plutôt qu’une autre.

L’effet richesse résulte d’une croissance de l’économie permettant aux agents économiques d’accroître leur consommation au cours du temps. Ces perspectives d’accroissement de la consommation amènent les agents économiques à privilégier le temps présent et à utiliser un facteur d’actualisation d’autant plus élevé qu’ils envisagent un horizon lointain.

Parallèlement à cet éventuel effet richesse, on comprend aussi que le taux d’actualisation d’équilibre dépend des caractéristiques et des choix des agents. Il se peut qu’ils préfèrent fortement lisser dans le temps leur consommation, ou au contraire qu’ils n’éprouvent aucune aversion face à une éventuelle inégalité de la distribution inter-temporelle de leur consommation. Techniquement, une fois la fonction d’utilité des consommateurs connue (ou supposée), c’est le degré de curvature de cette fonction qui nous fournira le coefficient d’aversion R des consommateurs au risque de déséquilibre inter-temporel de leur consommation.

Si ce coefficient est égal à 1, cela signifie que le consommateur sera prêt à réduire sa consommation d’une unité au temps 0 en vue de bénéficier d’une unité de consommation supplémentaire au temps 1. Un coefficient de 2 signifierait qu’il est prêt pour cela à réduire sa consommation de 2 unités au temps 0. Il est raisonnable de penser que R est compris entre 1 et 2.

Dans cet te perspective, Ramsey en 1928 a proposé une formulation tout à la fois simple et éclairante du taux d’actualisation d’équilibre. En retenant une fonction puissance pour mesurer l’utilité perçue par le consommateur, il a montré que l’effet richesse dans la formation du taux d’actualisation d’équilibre était égal au produit du taux de croissance nominal par période de l’économie et du coefficient d’aversion R des consommateurs. Il est ainsi conduit à la relation suivante :

r = δ + gR

où r est le taux d’actualisation d’équilibre, δ le taux d’impatience, g le taux de croissance nominal par période de l’économie et R le coefficient d’aversion des consommateurs au risque de déséquilibre inter-temporel de leur consommation.

En admet tant une valeur très faible pour δ et une valeur proche de l’unité pour R, on voit que le taux de croissance nominal de l’économie constitue une valeur de référence pour le taux d’actualisation d’équilibre. Ce taux d’actualisation d’équilibre, comme cela a été précisé, est le taux sans risque qui doit être utilisé pour valoriser des actifs sans risque ; si l’on s’intéresse à des actifs risqués, il faut bien sûr lui adjoindre une prime de risque.

Dans le contexte actuel, la relation de Ramsey permet d’apprécier l’ampleur des effets des politiques non conventionnelles des banques centrales qui ont fait émerger sur les marchés financiers un taux sans risque proche de 0%.

LE TAUX D’ACTUALISATION DE LONG TERME

La notion de taux d’actualisation d’équilibre étant précisée, on peut maintenant aborder la question de la structure des taux d’actualisation selon leur terme.

On vient de voir que le taux d’actualisation est déterminé par le taux d’impatience des consommateurs, leur coefficient d’aversion R et les anticipations de taux de croissance de l’économie. En considérant comme négligeable le taux d’impatience et en supposant que le coefficient d’aversion reste inchangé au cours du temps, cela confère un rôle très important aux perspectives économiques : le taux d’actualisation selon la maturité va principalement refléter les attentes des agents économiques en matière de taux de croissance futur.

Ainsi, si l’on anticipe une croissance économique à un taux constant g, la structure des taux selon le terme sera plate. Si l’on anticipe une accélération de la croissance (une croissance du taux de croissance), la structure des taux sera croissante avec la maturité. En revanche, si l’on s’attend à une décélération de la croissance, la structure des taux sera décroissante.

On perçoit ainsi la fonction informative de la structure des taux selon le terme qui permettra de renseigner l’observateur sur les anticipations des opérateurs du marché financier en matière d’anticipations du taux de croissance de l’économie.

ON VOIT AUSSI QUE LA PÉNALISATION DES CASH FLOWS DE LONG TERME PAR LE PROCESSUS D’ACTUALISATION N’EST PAS INÉLUCTABLE.

Lorsque les perspectives économiques sont baissières, la structure des taux devrait être décroissante. Mais il ne faut pas forcément en déduire que cette forme de la yield curve est synonyme de catastrophe annoncée. Elle peut très bien correspondre à un retour à la normale après une période de surchauffe. Par exemple, pour revenir à l’actualité, si le taux de croissance de l’économie est particulièrement élevé du fait de phénomènes de rattrapage, et marque un écart important par rapport au taux de croissance soutenable dans le long terme, la structure des taux devrait être décroissante et le taux d’actualisation court plus élevé que le taux d’actualisation applicable à des échéances plus lointaines.

Ce n’est que l’action des banques centrales, surtout perceptible sur des échéances courtes, qui empêche aujourd’hui une telle observation statistique.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #4 – Côté culturel

La valeur travail a-t-elle encore un sens ?

Sophie Chassat
Philosophe, Associée chez Wemean

« Dès lors que « l’exercice du métier » ne peut pas être directement mis en relation avec les valeurs spirituelles suprêmes de la civilisation – et que, à l’inverse, il ne peut pas être éprouvé subjectivement comme une simple contrainte économique –, l’individu renonce généralement à lui donner un sens », écrit en 1905 Max Weber à la fin de L’Éthique protestante et l’Esprit du capitalisme. Or n’est-ce pas ce que nous observons un siècle plus tard ? Un monde où la valeur travail semble avoir perdu de son évidence : comme si elle était « en voie de disparition »…

Big Quit aux Etats-Unis, hashtags #quitmyjob, #nodreamjob ou #no_labor, communautés aux millions de followers comme le groupe Antiwork du réseau social Reddit : les signaux se multiplient pour manifester une forme de révolte, voire de dégoût du travail. Pas seulement une évolution de celui-ci (comme le télétravail et la fin du salariat comme modèle d’emploi exclusif pourraient le laisser penser), mais un mouvement de remise en question bien plus profond : comme un refus de travailler. On est loin de la déclaration d’un Chaplin faisant de l’idéal du travail celui de la vie même : « Travailler, c’est vivre – et j’adore vivre ! »

Pour Max Weber, le travail s’est imposé comme valeur structurante de nos sociétés au moment où la réforme protestante s’est définitivement ancrée dans le paysage européen et triomphalement exportée aux Etats-Unis. Mais le sociologue ne cesse de le répéter : le succès de cette ardeur au travail ne s’explique que par l’intérêt spirituel qui lui était alors lié. C’est parce qu’une vie consacrée au labeur était le signe le plus certain d’une élection par Dieu que des hommes s’y adonnèrent avec tant d’ardeur.

Quand la valeur éthique du travail ne fut plus religieuse, elle devint sociale : l’indice de l’intégration à la communauté et de la reconnaissance de l’accomplissement individuel.

Et aujourd’hui ? À quoi tient la valeur spirituelle du travail quand vacille le paradigme de la (sur)production et de la croissance sans limite, et au moment où la « monnaie hélicoptère » a coulé à flots pendant de longs mois ? Les jeunes générations, qui bousculent avec le plus de véhémence l’évidence de cette valeur travail, doivent nous amener à expliciter le sens de cette dernière pour le XXIe siècle : car les études se multiplient pour montrer que les jeunes ne sont plus prêts à travailler à n’importe quel prix.

La philosophe Simone Weil, qui avait travaillé en usine, croyait en une « civilisation du travail », dans laquelle ce dernier deviendrait « la valeur la plus haute, par son rapport avec l’homme qui l’exécute [et non] par son rapport avec ce qu’il produit. » Faire de l’homme la mesure du travail : voilà peut-être ce par quoi il faut commencer pour, demain, associer à nouveau une dimension éthique au travail – la seule à même d’en justifier la valorisation. « Notre époque a pour mission propre, pour vocation, la constitution d’une civilisation fondée sur la spiritualité du travail », écrivait encore Simone Weil.

____________

1 Max Weber, L’Éthique protestante et l’esprit du capitalisme, Flammarion « Champs Classiques », 2017.

2 Dominique Méda, Le Travail ; Une Valeur en voie de disparition ?, Flammarion « Champs-Essais », 2010.

3 David Robinson Chaplin: His Life and Art, 2013, Penguin Biography.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #4 – Zoom sectoriel

Banque de détail, la querelle des anciens et des modernes

David Chollet
Associé,
Accuracy

Nicolas Darbo
Associé,
Accuracy

Amaury Pouradier Duteil
Associé, Accuracy

La banque de détail est un secteur dont le rythme de transformation va aller en s’accélérant dans les prochaines années. Ces dix dernières années ont surtout vu les modes de distribution évoluer vers davantage de digitalisation, sans toutefois remettre en cause le modèle physique. Dans les dix ans qui viennent, dans un monde où la technologie va progressivement permettre de servir les grands univers de besoins via des plateformes, il faudra faire évoluer à la fois l’offre, la distribution et les solutions technologiques.

1. LES TRANSFORMATIONS À L’OEUVRE

Inutile de revenir trop longtemps sur le contexte dans lequel la banque de détail se déploie depuis plusieurs années, avec trois défis principaux : des taux ultra-bas, une réglementation qui s’est considérablement durcie depuis 2008 et la survenance de nouveaux acteurs.

Au-delà de ce contexte, le secteur connaît des mutations technologiques majeures. La première d’entre elles concerne la donnée. Ainsi, l’open banking désigne une tendance de fond qui pousse à l’ouverture des systèmes d’information des banques et le partage des données de leurs clients (identité, historiques de transactions…). Un nouvel écosystème bancaire ouvert se dessine progressivement, dans lequel de multiples acteurs (banques, établissements de paiement, éditeurs technologiques…) partagent des données et intègrent les services des uns et des autres dans leurs propres interfaces, permettant à de nouveaux services et outils de voir le jour.

Autre évolution majeure : la BaaS, ou bank As A Service. Historiquement, la banque de détail était une industrie de coûts fixes. L’ouverture des donnée, la bascule sur le cloud et l’APIsation des systèmes bancaires rendent désormais caduques ces modèles de production fermés et verticalement intégrés. Chacune des briques de production des services financiers peut désormais être proposée « As-a-service ». Cette transformation conduit à une bascule d’un modèle économique à coûts fixes vers une logique de coûts variables. En externalisant leur banking system, les challengers digitaux peuvent ainsi se lancer avec des coûts et des délais compressés.

Enfin, le secteur ne peut pas rester complètement à l’écart du phénomène des super-apps qui progressivement modifient les usages en agrégeant des services issus d’univers de besoins très différents. Cette évolution peut lentement rendre obsolète la façon de servir les clients et nécessite probablement le développement de ce que l’on pourrait qualifier de « finance embarquée ».

2. L’AVENIR DES ACTEURS TRADITIONNELS

Les banques traditionnelles ont globalement résisté aux vents contraires cités précédemment, avec, depuis dix ans, des revenus qui ne se sont pas effondrés, même si leur croissance s’est avérée plutôt modérée.

Les acteurs traditionnels conservent un certain nombre de points forts. D’abord les banques historiques disposent de gammes de produits complètes, qui couvrent bien sûr la banque au quotidien (compte, carte, forfaits…) mais aussi les univers bilanciels du crédit et de l’épargne. Ranger l’informatique des grandes banques dans les points forts peut sembler provocateur. Néanmoins, ces grands systèmes, à défaut d’être agiles, sont souvent d’une très grande robustesse, tout en ayant permis de réduire l’écart technologique avec les néobanques. Enfin, les acteurs traditionnels sont puissants financièrement, et capables d’investir pour accélérer sur un plan technologique quand il le faut.

Ces acteurs ont quelques points faibles naturellement. Le principal concerne l’expérience client. Mais le sujet ne concerne pas l’écart avec les néobanques, qui a été le plus souvent comblé, mais plutôt avec des acteurs purement technologiques par exemple. Dans le mouvement de convergence des univers de besoins, cela peut constituer un handicap pour le secteur financier dans son ensemble. Un autre point faible concerne la faible marge de manoeuvre en matière de réduction des effectifs ou des agences s’il fallait mettre en oeuvre des programmes massifs de baisse des coûts.

Ces acteurs déploient ou vont devoir déployer plusieurs natures de stratégies. Il y a d’abord des actions de nature financière, soit de concentration, soit de restructuration. La concentration vise à céder toutes les activités éloignées des marchés principaux pour être le plus gros possible sur les marchés domestiques. Les restructurations, en Espagne notamment, mais aussi en France avec le rapprochement SG et CDN, visent à abaisser le point mort.

D’autres actions devront être mises en oeuvre par les banques. Sur le plan informatique, il arrivera un moment, plus très loin, où le manque d’agilité des systèmes historiques ne sera plus compensé par leur robustesse. Les évolutions vont s’accélérer et la vitesse d’évolution va devenir clef.

Enfin, les acteurs traditionnels vont devoir repenser leurs modèles de distribution à l’aune du digital et de la convergence du service des grandes natures de besoins, qui vont permettre la finance embarquée. L’idée de cette dernière est d’intégrer la souscription du produit financier directement au parcours de consommation ou d’achat du client. Le service financier devient ainsi disponible de façon contextuelle et digitale.

3. L’AVENIR DES NÉOBANQUES

Les néobanques se sont développées par vagues successives depuis plus de vingt ans, et la dernière vague a vu apparaître des acteurs se développant rapidement et acquérant des clients par millions et capable de lever des fonds colossaux sur la promesse d’un basculement massif de clients vers leur modèle.

Le premier point fort des néobanques concerne leur technologie. Etant partis de zéro sur le plan de l’IT, elles ont pu s’appuyer sur la BaaS pour développer exactement ce dont ils avaient besoin et avec le bon niveau d’expérience client. Par ailleurs, ces acteurs ciblent généralement des segments précis et proposent en conséquence une offre et un parcours client parfaitement adaptés, ce qui est plus difficile pour les grandes banques généralistes.

Les points faibles sont souvent le corollaire de leurs points forts. L’offre limitée permet certes de mieux répondre à certains besoins précis, mais dans un monde où la technologie permet l’émergence de plateformes multi-services, n’adresser qu’une partie des besoins en matière de services financiers ne va pas forcément dans le bon sens et place les néobanques à la périphérie d’un métier qui lui-même n’est pas le mieux placé dans le mouvement de convergence des besoins. Mais si l’offre est limitée, ce n’est pas forcément par choix. Développer l’univers du crédit et de l’épargne, le plus souvent absent au sein des néobanques, nécessiterait de changer de dimension en matière de contrôles et de consommation de capital notamment. Enfin, la conséquence de cette offre limitée est l’incapacité à capter en masse le client le plus rentable de la banque de détail, le bancarisé principal. Cela explique la faiblesse des revenus, qui plafonnent à vingt euros par client.

Cela ne condamne pas forcément l’avenir des néobanques. Déjà, il faut distinguer les pays matures des pays non matures en matière de bancarisation. Dans les pays peu bancarisés, les néobanques ont souvent un boulevard devant elles, à l’image de Nubank au Brésil (40 millions de clients). Dans les pays ultra-bancarisés, l’histoire est différente. La faiblesse des revenus et le mouvement de convergence des grandes natures de besoin devraient obliger les néobanques à réaliser des choix. Elles peuvent étendre d’urgence leur offre au bilan, comme Revolut semble l’entrevoir. Elles peuvent aussi décider de sauter l’étape du bilan pour élargir directement leur offre à d’autres univers de besoins, comme le réalise Tinkoff. Elles peuvent enfin se faire racheter par un acteur traditionnel qui y verrait un intérêt sur un plan technologique, sans trop tarder néanmoins.

Le secteur de la banque de détail est plus que jamais sous le coup de transformations majeures, soit endogènes, comme celles qui touchent à la donnée et à la BaaS, soit exogènes, comme le développement de plateformes servant plusieurs natures de grandes besoins, avec à l’origine un souhait de « simplification » de la part des consommateurs. Dans ce contexte, les acteurs t raditionnels se doivent d’adresser deux sujets majeurs : la finance embarquée d’une part, et peut-être la bascule « à terme » vers des systèmes réso lument plus agiles pour rester compétitifs. Quant aux néobanques, il faudra d’urgence étendre l’of fre au bilan, au risque de perdre en agilité, soit à d’autres univers de besoins.

Mais le secteur financier dans son ensemble devra probablement chercher à simplifier drastiquement la consommation de leurs services, face à des acteurs non financiers qui ont déjà opéré cette transformation.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #4 – Histoires de start-up

H2X-Ecosystems

Romain Proglio
Associé, Accuracy

Créée en 2018 et originaire de Saint-Malo, H2X-Ecosystems propose aux territoires et aux entreprises de créer un écosystème vertueux complet alliant production d’énergie et mobilité décarbonées, qui permet à la fois de produire et consommer sur place l’hydrogène. Ces écosystèmes sont coconstruits avec et pour les acteurs locaux afin de valoriser au mieux leurs ressources territoriales pour créer de la valeur ajoutée tout en la maintenant à l’échelle locale. Ils participent ainsi au développement de ces territoires ruraux, périurbains ou urbains.

L’hydrogène renouvelable et bas carbone est produit à partir des ENR et du procédé d’électrolyse de l’eau, qui est récemment devenu un des leviers majeurs vers la décarbonation. La société associe cette production à des consommateurs classiques (bus, bennes à ordure, etc.) mais aussi et surtout des services de mobilité légère et de livraison: voitures en libre-service et livraison des derniers kilomètres. H2X-Ecosystems a ainsi rendu accessible une voiture hybride fonctionnant à la fois à l’énergie solaire et à l’hydrogène, grâce à laquelle les bornes on-grid de rechargement ne sont donc plus nécessaires. Le tout sans émission sonore, ni de gaz à effet de serre (CO2, NOx, etc.)

Plus généralement, H2X-Ecosystems est présent sur l’ensemble de la chaîne de valeur de l’hydrogène de la production, à la consommation en passant par le stockage : électrolyseur, groupe électro-hydrogène forte puissance, powerpack (piles à combustible et réservoirs amovibles) pouvant être intégrés dans des solutions de mobilités légères.

Ainsi, H2X-Ecosystems a signé un accord de partenariat avec Enedis Bretagne pour le déploiement de son groupe électro-hydrogène de forte puissance conçu pour fournir une alimentation électrique provisoire, en période de travaux ou lors d’un incident, au réseau d’électricité. Ce groupe permet, de fait, de réduire les émissions de CO2 et sonores d’ENEDIS en remplaçant leurs groupes fossiles par cette technologie.

De plus, dans une période de contrainte forte sur les prix de l’énergie, la proposition de valeur portée par H2X ECOSYSTEMS permet de tendre vers une maîtrise des dépenses énergétiques et vers une autonomie énergétique des sites industriels en s’appuyant notamment sur ce générateur électro-hydrogène couplé à d’autres systèmes complémentaires (ENR, production sur site d’hydrogène, etc.).

Dans sa présentation du plan France 2030, le Président de la République Emmanuel Macron a réaffirmé l’importance de ce secteur à l’avenir : « Nous allons investir près de 2 milliards d’euros pour développer l’hydrogène vert. C’est une bataille pour l’écologie, pour l’emploi, pour la souveraineté de notre pays que nous allons mener ».

S’appuyant notamment sur l’énergie nucléaire pour produire de l’électrolyse très décarbonée, la France a un rôle de leader à jouer et H2X-Ecosystems y participe pleinement en implantant ses premiers outils de production en France tout en conciliant son développement avec une démarche écologique vertueuse créatrice de valeurs ajoutées, indépendance énergétique et rentabilité pour les entreprises et les territoires.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #4 – Point de vue

Vers un nouvel âge d’or du nucléaire !

René Pigot
Associé, Accuracy

Après avoir été fragilisée par plusieurs évènements et décisions défavorables (Fukushima, Flamanville, Fessenheim), l’industrie du nucléaire connaît aujourd’hui un regain d’intérêt.

La récente annonce par le Président de la République française du lancement d’un programme de construction de 6 réacteurs EPR2 traduit le choix de maintenir un socle de production d’électricité décarbonée à partir de l’énergie nucléaire. Si elle fait l’objet de débats, cette décision relève d’un pragmatisme froid : malgré la démonstration d’un déploiement à grande échelle, les énergies renouvelables restent soumises aux aléas météorologiques et ne seront pas en mesure de se substituer aux moyens de production d’énergie pilotables, tant les engagements de réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre à horizon 2050 sont ambitieux.

Face à l’électrification de l’économie, le choix de maintenir le nucléaire dans le mix énergétique français aux côtés des énergies renouvelables n’est pas une option mais relève de la nécessité. Le garant de l’équilibre des réseaux en France, RTE, le reconnait également : les scénarios sans renouvellement du parc nucléaire reposent, en matière de sécurité d’approvisionnement, sur des paris technologiques et sociétaux significatifs. Au-delà de ces aspects, le nucléaire constitue également un vecteur évident d’indépendance énergétique pour les européens. L’actualité nous le rappelle cruellement, et a failli faire infléchir la position du Gouvernement fédéral allemand sur son retrait du nucléaire.

En France, les premières estimations font état d’un coût de construction de 52mds€ mais les modalités de financement restent encore à définir. Seule certitude, le soutien de l’Etat sera indispensable pour garantir la compétitivité du prix final de l’électricité, compte tenu de l’ampleur des investissements et des risques pesant sur ce projet. Il faudra enfin faire preuve d’imagination en terme d’ingénierie financière afin d’aligner les intérêts de l’Etat, d’EDF et des consommateurs.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #4 (FR)

Pour notre quatrième édition de Accuracy Talks Straight, René Pigot fait le point sur l’industrie du nucléaire, avant de laisser Romain Proglio nous présenter H2X-Ecosystems, une start-up permmettant aux territoires et aux entreprises de produire et consommer sur place l’hydrogène. Nous analyserons ensuite l’évolution de la banque de détail avec David Chollet, Nicolas Darbo et Amaury Pouradier Duteil.
Sophie Chassat, Philosophe et associée chez Wemean, nous proposera d’étudier le sens de la valeur travail. Enfin, nous nous focaliserons sur le taux d’actualisation avec Philippe Raimbourg, Directeur de l’Ecole de Management de la Sorbonne et Professeur affilié à ESCP Business School, ainsi que l’amélioration du panorama économique avec Hervé Goulletquer, Senior Economic Advisor.


SOMMAIRE


Vers un nouvel âge d’or du nucléaire !

René Pigot
Associé, Accuracy

Après avoir été fragilisée par plusieurs évènements et décisions défavorables (Fukushima, Flamanville, Fessenheim), l’industrie du nucléaire connaît aujourd’hui un regain d’intérêt.

La récente annonce par le Président de la République française du lancement d’un programme de construction de 6 réacteurs EPR2 traduit le choix de maintenir un socle de production d’électricité décarbonée à partir de l’énergie nucléaire. Si elle fait l’objet de débats, cette décision relève d’un pragmatisme froid : malgré la démonstration d’un déploiement à grande échelle, les énergies renouvelables restent soumises aux aléas météorologiques et ne seront pas en mesure de se substituer aux moyens de production d’énergie pilotables, tant les engagements de réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre à horizon 2050 sont ambitieux.

Face à l’électrification de l’économie, le choix de maintenir le nucléaire dans le mix énergétique français aux côtés des énergies renouvelables n’est pas une option mais relève de la nécessité. Le garant de l’équilibre des réseaux en France, RTE, le reconnait également : les scénarios sans renouvellement du parc nucléaire reposent, en matière de sécurité d’approvisionnement, sur des paris technologiques et sociétaux significatifs. Au-delà de ces aspects, le nucléaire constitue également un vecteur évident d’indépendance énergétique pour les européens. L’actualité nous le rappelle cruellement, et a failli faire infléchir la position du Gouvernement fédéral allemand sur son retrait du nucléaire.

En France, les premières estimations font état d’un coût de construction de 52mds€ mais les modalités de financement restent encore à définir. Seule certitude, le soutien de l’Etat sera indispensable pour garantir la compétitivité du prix final de l’électricité, compte tenu de l’ampleur des investissements et des risques pesant sur ce projet. Il faudra enfin faire preuve d’imagination en terme d’ingénierie financière afin d’aligner les intérêts de l’Etat, d’EDF et des consommateurs.


H2X-Ecosystems

Romain Proglio
Associé, Accuracy

Créée en 2018 et originaire de Saint-Malo, H2X-Ecosystems propose aux territoires et aux entreprises de créer un écosystème vertueux complet alliant production d’énergie et mobilité décarbonées, qui permet à la fois de produire et consommer sur place l’hydrogène. Ces écosystèmes sont coconstruits avec et pour les acteurs locaux afin de valoriser au mieux leurs ressources territoriales pour créer de la valeur ajoutée tout en la maintenant à l’échelle locale. Ils participent ainsi au développement de ces territoires ruraux, périurbains ou urbains.

L’hydrogène renouvelable et bas carbone est produit à partir des ENR et du procédé d’électrolyse de l’eau, qui est récemment devenu un des leviers majeurs vers la décarbonation. La société associe cette production à des consommateurs classiques (bus, bennes à ordure, etc.) mais aussi et surtout des services de mobilité légère et de livraison: voitures en libre-service et livraison des derniers kilomètres. H2X-Ecosystems a ainsi rendu accessible une voiture hybride fonctionnant à la fois à l’énergie solaire et à l’hydrogène, grâce à laquelle les bornes on-grid de rechargement ne sont donc plus nécessaires. Le tout sans émission sonore, ni de gaz à effet de serre (CO2, NOx, etc.)

Plus généralement, H2X-Ecosystems est présent sur l’ensemble de la chaîne de valeur de l’hydrogène de la production, à la consommation en passant par le stockage : électrolyseur, groupe électro-hydrogène forte puissance, powerpack (piles à combustible et réservoirs amovibles) pouvant être intégrés dans des solutions de mobilités légères.

Ainsi, H2X-Ecosystems a signé un accord de partenariat avec Enedis Bretagne pour le déploiement de son groupe électro-hydrogène de forte puissance conçu pour fournir une alimentation électrique provisoire, en période de travaux ou lors d’un incident, au réseau d’électricité. Ce groupe permet, de fait, de réduire les émissions de CO2 et sonores d’ENEDIS en remplaçant leurs groupes fossiles par cette technologie.

De plus, dans une période de contrainte forte sur les prix de l’énergie, la proposition de valeur portée par H2X ECOSYSTEMS permet de tendre vers une maîtrise des dépenses énergétiques et vers une autonomie énergétique des sites industriels en s’appuyant notamment sur ce générateur électro-hydrogène couplé à d’autres systèmes complémentaires (ENR, production sur site d’hydrogène, etc.).

Dans sa présentation du plan France 2030, le Président de la République Emmanuel Macron a réaffirmé l’importance de ce secteur à l’avenir : « Nous allons investir près de 2 milliards d’euros pour développer l’hydrogène vert. C’est une bataille pour l’écologie, pour l’emploi, pour la souveraineté de notre pays que nous allons mener ».

S’appuyant notamment sur l’énergie nucléaire pour produire de l’électrolyse très décarbonée, la France a un rôle de leader à jouer et H2X-Ecosystems y participe pleinement en implantant ses premiers outils de production en France tout en conciliant son développement avec une démarche écologique vertueuse créatrice de valeurs ajoutées, indépendance énergétique et rentabilité pour les entreprises et les territoires.


Banque de détail, la querelle des anciens et des modernes

David Chollet
Associé,
Accuracy

Nicolas Darbo
Associé,
Accuracy

Amaury Pouradier Duteil
Associé, Accuracy

La banque de détail est un secteur dont le rythme de transformation va aller en s’accélérant dans les prochaines années. Ces dix dernières années ont surtout vu les modes de distribution évoluer vers davantage de digitalisation, sans toutefois remettre en cause le modèle physique. Dans les dix ans qui viennent, dans un monde où la technologie va progressivement permettre de servir les grands univers de besoins via des plateformes, il faudra faire évoluer à la fois l’offre, la distribution et les solutions technologiques.

1. LES TRANSFORMATIONS À L’OEUVRE

Inutile de revenir trop longtemps sur le contexte dans lequel la banque de détail se déploie depuis plusieurs années, avec trois défis principaux : des taux ultra-bas, une réglementation qui s’est considérablement durcie depuis 2008 et la survenance de nouveaux acteurs.

Au-delà de ce contexte, le secteur connaît des mutations technologiques majeures. La première d’entre elles concerne la donnée. Ainsi, l’open banking désigne une tendance de fond qui pousse à l’ouverture des systèmes d’information des banques et le partage des données de leurs clients (identité, historiques de transactions…). Un nouvel écosystème bancaire ouvert se dessine progressivement, dans lequel de multiples acteurs (banques, établissements de paiement, éditeurs technologiques…) partagent des données et intègrent les services des uns et des autres dans leurs propres interfaces, permettant à de nouveaux services et outils de voir le jour.

Autre évolution majeure : la BaaS, ou bank As A Service. Historiquement, la banque de détail était une industrie de coûts fixes. L’ouverture des donnée, la bascule sur le cloud et l’APIsation des systèmes bancaires rendent désormais caduques ces modèles de production fermés et verticalement intégrés. Chacune des briques de production des services financiers peut désormais être proposée « As-a-service ». Cette transformation conduit à une bascule d’un modèle économique à coûts fixes vers une logique de coûts variables. En externalisant leur banking system, les challengers digitaux peuvent ainsi se lancer avec des coûts et des délais compressés.

Enfin, le secteur ne peut pas rester complètement à l’écart du phénomène des super-apps qui progressivement modifient les usages en agrégeant des services issus d’univers de besoins très différents. Cette évolution peut lentement rendre obsolète la façon de servir les clients et nécessite probablement le développement de ce que l’on pourrait qualifier de « finance embarquée ».

2. L’AVENIR DES ACTEURS TRADITIONNELS

Les banques traditionnelles ont globalement résisté aux vents contraires cités précédemment, avec, depuis dix ans, des revenus qui ne se sont pas effondrés, même si leur croissance s’est avérée plutôt modérée.

Les acteurs traditionnels conservent un certain nombre de points forts. D’abord les banques historiques disposent de gammes de produits complètes, qui couvrent bien sûr la banque au quotidien (compte, carte, forfaits…) mais aussi les univers bilanciels du crédit et de l’épargne. Ranger l’informatique des grandes banques dans les points forts peut sembler provocateur. Néanmoins, ces grands systèmes, à défaut d’être agiles, sont souvent d’une très grande robustesse, tout en ayant permis de réduire l’écart technologique avec les néobanques. Enfin, les acteurs traditionnels sont puissants financièrement, et capables d’investir pour accélérer sur un plan technologique quand il le faut.

Ces acteurs ont quelques points faibles naturellement. Le principal concerne l’expérience client. Mais le sujet ne concerne pas l’écart avec les néobanques, qui a été le plus souvent comblé, mais plutôt avec des acteurs purement technologiques par exemple. Dans le mouvement de convergence des univers de besoins, cela peut constituer un handicap pour le secteur financier dans son ensemble. Un autre point faible concerne la faible marge de manoeuvre en matière de réduction des effectifs ou des agences s’il fallait mettre en oeuvre des programmes massifs de baisse des coûts.

Ces acteurs déploient ou vont devoir déployer plusieurs natures de stratégies. Il y a d’abord des actions de nature financière, soit de concentration, soit de restructuration. La concentration vise à céder toutes les activités éloignées des marchés principaux pour être le plus gros possible sur les marchés domestiques. Les restructurations, en Espagne notamment, mais aussi en France avec le rapprochement SG et CDN, visent à abaisser le point mort.

D’autres actions devront être mises en oeuvre par les banques. Sur le plan informatique, il arrivera un moment, plus très loin, où le manque d’agilité des systèmes historiques ne sera plus compensé par leur robustesse. Les évolutions vont s’accélérer et la vitesse d’évolution va devenir clef.

Enfin, les acteurs traditionnels vont devoir repenser leurs modèles de distribution à l’aune du digital et de la convergence du service des grandes natures de besoins, qui vont permettre la finance embarquée. L’idée de cette dernière est d’intégrer la souscription du produit financier directement au parcours de consommation ou d’achat du client. Le service financier devient ainsi disponible de façon contextuelle et digitale.

3. L’AVENIR DES NÉOBANQUES

Les néobanques se sont développées par vagues successives depuis plus de vingt ans, et la dernière vague a vu apparaître des acteurs se développant rapidement et acquérant des clients par millions et capable de lever des fonds colossaux sur la promesse d’un basculement massif de clients vers leur modèle.

Le premier point fort des néobanques concerne leur technologie. Etant partis de zéro sur le plan de l’IT, elles ont pu s’appuyer sur la BaaS pour développer exactement ce dont ils avaient besoin et avec le bon niveau d’expérience client. Par ailleurs, ces acteurs ciblent généralement des segments précis et proposent en conséquence une offre et un parcours client parfaitement adaptés, ce qui est plus difficile pour les grandes banques généralistes.

Les points faibles sont souvent le corollaire de leurs points forts. L’offre limitée permet certes de mieux répondre à certains besoins précis, mais dans un monde où la technologie permet l’émergence de plateformes multi-services, n’adresser qu’une partie des besoins en matière de services financiers ne va pas forcément dans le bon sens et place les néobanques à la périphérie d’un métier qui lui-même n’est pas le mieux placé dans le mouvement de convergence des besoins. Mais si l’offre est limitée, ce n’est pas forcément par choix. Développer l’univers du crédit et de l’épargne, le plus souvent absent au sein des néobanques, nécessiterait de changer de dimension en matière de contrôles et de consommation de capital notamment. Enfin, la conséquence de cette offre limitée est l’incapacité à capter en masse le client le plus rentable de la banque de détail, le bancarisé principal. Cela explique la faiblesse des revenus, qui plafonnent à vingt euros par client.

Cela ne condamne pas forcément l’avenir des néobanques. Déjà, il faut distinguer les pays matures des pays non matures en matière de bancarisation. Dans les pays peu bancarisés, les néobanques ont souvent un boulevard devant elles, à l’image de Nubank au Brésil (40 millions de clients). Dans les pays ultra-bancarisés, l’histoire est différente. La faiblesse des revenus et le mouvement de convergence des grandes natures de besoin devraient obliger les néobanques à réaliser des choix. Elles peuvent étendre d’urgence leur offre au bilan, comme Revolut semble l’entrevoir. Elles peuvent aussi décider de sauter l’étape du bilan pour élargir directement leur offre à d’autres univers de besoins, comme le réalise Tinkoff. Elles peuvent enfin se faire racheter par un acteur traditionnel qui y verrait un intérêt sur un plan technologique, sans trop tarder néanmoins.

Le secteur de la banque de détail est plus que jamais sous le coup de transformations majeures, soit endogènes, comme celles qui touchent à la donnée et à la BaaS, soit exogènes, comme le développement de plateformes servant plusieurs natures de grandes besoins, avec à l’origine un souhait de « simplification » de la part des consommateurs. Dans ce contexte, les acteurs t raditionnels se doivent d’adresser deux sujets majeurs : la finance embarquée d’une part, et peut-être la bascule « à terme » vers des systèmes réso lument plus agiles pour rester compétitifs. Quant aux néobanques, il faudra d’urgence étendre l’of fre au bilan, au risque de perdre en agilité, soit à d’autres univers de besoins.

Mais le secteur financier dans son ensemble devra probablement chercher à simplifier drastiquement la consommation de leurs services, face à des acteurs non financiers qui ont déjà opéré cette transformation.


La valeur travail a-t-elle encore un sens ?

Sophie Chassat
Philosophe, Associée chez Wemean

« Dès lors que « l’exercice du métier » ne peut pas être directement mis en relation avec les valeurs spirituelles suprêmes de la civilisation – et que, à l’inverse, il ne peut pas être éprouvé subjectivement comme une simple contrainte économique –, l’individu renonce généralement à lui donner un sens », écrit en 1905 Max Weber à la fin de L’Éthique protestante et l’Esprit du capitalisme. Or n’est-ce pas ce que nous observons un siècle plus tard ? Un monde où la valeur travail semble avoir perdu de son évidence : comme si elle était « en voie de disparition »…

Big Quit aux Etats-Unis, hashtags #quitmyjob, #nodreamjob ou #no_labor, communautés aux millions de followers comme le groupe Antiwork du réseau social Reddit : les signaux se multiplient pour manifester une forme de révolte, voire de dégoût du travail. Pas seulement une évolution de celui-ci (comme le télétravail et la fin du salariat comme modèle d’emploi exclusif pourraient le laisser penser), mais un mouvement de remise en question bien plus profond : comme un refus de travailler. On est loin de la déclaration d’un Chaplin faisant de l’idéal du travail celui de la vie même : « Travailler, c’est vivre – et j’adore vivre ! »

Pour Max Weber, le travail s’est imposé comme valeur structurante de nos sociétés au moment où la réforme protestante s’est définitivement ancrée dans le paysage européen et triomphalement exportée aux Etats-Unis. Mais le sociologue ne cesse de le répéter : le succès de cette ardeur au travail ne s’explique que par l’intérêt spirituel qui lui était alors lié. C’est parce qu’une vie consacrée au labeur était le signe le plus certain d’une élection par Dieu que des hommes s’y adonnèrent avec tant d’ardeur.

Quand la valeur éthique du travail ne fut plus religieuse, elle devint sociale : l’indice de l’intégration à la communauté et de la reconnaissance de l’accomplissement individuel.

Et aujourd’hui ? À quoi tient la valeur spirituelle du travail quand vacille le paradigme de la (sur)production et de la croissance sans limite, et au moment où la « monnaie hélicoptère » a coulé à flots pendant de longs mois ? Les jeunes générations, qui bousculent avec le plus de véhémence l’évidence de cette valeur travail, doivent nous amener à expliciter le sens de cette dernière pour le XXIe siècle : car les études se multiplient pour montrer que les jeunes ne sont plus prêts à travailler à n’importe quel prix.

La philosophe Simone Weil, qui avait travaillé en usine, croyait en une « civilisation du travail », dans laquelle ce dernier deviendrait « la valeur la plus haute, par son rapport avec l’homme qui l’exécute [et non] par son rapport avec ce qu’il produit. » Faire de l’homme la mesure du travail : voilà peut-être ce par quoi il faut commencer pour, demain, associer à nouveau une dimension éthique au travail – la seule à même d’en justifier la valorisation. « Notre époque a pour mission propre, pour vocation, la constitution d’une civilisation fondée sur la spiritualité du travail », écrivait encore Simone Weil.

____________

1 Max Weber, L’Éthique protestante et l’esprit du capitalisme, Flammarion « Champs Classiques », 2017.

2 Dominique Méda, Le Travail ; Une Valeur en voie de disparition ?, Flammarion « Champs-Essais », 2010.

3 David Robinson Chaplin: His Life and Art, 2013, Penguin Biography.


Le taux d’actualisation de long terme

Philippe Raimbourg
Directeur de l’Ecole de Management de la Sorbonne (Université Panthéon-Sorbonne)
Professeur affilié à ESCP Business School

Si depuis Irving Fisher, on sait que la valeur d’un actif se confond avec la valeur actualisée des flux financiers qu’il est susceptible de générer, on sait aussi que le processus d’actualisation érode fortement les flux de long terme et réduit d’autant l’attrait des projets de maturité importante.

CE RÉSULTAT EST LA CONSÉQUENCE D’UN DOUBLE PHÉNOMÈNE :

le passage du temps qui, mécaniquement, rabote la valeur actuelle de tous les flux éloignés,
• mais aussi, la forme de la structure des taux selon le terme qui conduit généralement à retenir des taux d’actualisation d’autant plus élevés que leur échéance est lointaine ; on constate en effet, habituellement, que la yield curve est croissante avec la maturité du flux considéré.

LE PROCESSUS D’ACTUALISATION ÉRODE FORTEMENT LES FLUX DE LONG TERME

Pour cela, la majorité des entreprises investissent généralement dans des projets de court et moyen terme et laissent les projets de long terme à des organismes étatiques ou proches des Pouvoirs Publics. On cherchera ici à préciser l’éventuel caractère inéluctable de ce constat et sous quelles conditions les taux de long terme peuvent être moins pénalisants que ceux de court terme. Cela nous amènera dans un premier temps à préciser la notion de « taux d’actualisation d’équilibre ».

LE TAUX D’ACTUALISATION D’ÉQUILIBRE

On ne traite ici que du taux sans risque, avant prise en compte d’une éventuelle prime de risque. Dans un contexte de maximisation du bien-être inter-temporel des agents économiques, le taux d’actualisation d’équilibre est celui qui permet à un agent de choisir entre un investissement (c’est-à-dire une diminution de son bien-être immédiat résultant d’une réduction de sa consommation au temps 0 au profit d’une épargne autorisant l’investissement) et une consommation future, fruit de l’investissement réalisé.

ON MONTRE AISÉMENT QUE DEUX COMPOSANTES DÉTERMINENT LE TAUX D’ACTUALISATION D’ÉQUILIBRE :

le taux de préférence pour le présent des agents économiques ;
un éventuel effet-richesse qui est positif lorsqu’une croissance de la consommation est attendue.

Le taux de préférence pour le présent (ou encore, taux d’impatience) est un paramètre individuel dont la valeur peut fortement varier d’un individu à l’autre. Cependant, envisagé d’un point de vue macroéconomique, ce taux se situe dans une perspective intergénérationnelle qui nous incite à penser que la valeur de ce paramètre doit être proche de zéro. Aucun argument ne peut en effet justifier que l’on favorise une génération plutôt qu’une autre.

L’effet richesse résulte d’une croissance de l’économie permettant aux agents économiques d’accroître leur consommation au cours du temps. Ces perspectives d’accroissement de la consommation amènent les agents économiques à privilégier le temps présent et à utiliser un facteur d’actualisation d’autant plus élevé qu’ils envisagent un horizon lointain.

Parallèlement à cet éventuel effet richesse, on comprend aussi que le taux d’actualisation d’équilibre dépend des caractéristiques et des choix des agents. Il se peut qu’ils préfèrent fortement lisser dans le temps leur consommation, ou au contraire qu’ils n’éprouvent aucune aversion face à une éventuelle inégalité de la distribution inter-temporelle de leur consommation. Techniquement, une fois la fonction d’utilité des consommateurs connue (ou supposée), c’est le degré de curvature de cette fonction qui nous fournira le coefficient d’aversion R des consommateurs au risque de déséquilibre inter-temporel de leur consommation.

Si ce coefficient est égal à 1, cela signifie que le consommateur sera prêt à réduire sa consommation d’une unité au temps 0 en vue de bénéficier d’une unité de consommation supplémentaire au temps 1. Un coefficient de 2 signifierait qu’il est prêt pour cela à réduire sa consommation de 2 unités au temps 0. Il est raisonnable de penser que R est compris entre 1 et 2.

Dans cet te perspective, Ramsey en 1928 a proposé une formulation tout à la fois simple et éclairante du taux d’actualisation d’équilibre. En retenant une fonction puissance pour mesurer l’utilité perçue par le consommateur, il a montré que l’effet richesse dans la formation du taux d’actualisation d’équilibre était égal au produit du taux de croissance nominal par période de l’économie et du coefficient d’aversion R des consommateurs. Il est ainsi conduit à la relation suivante :

r = δ + gR

où r est le taux d’actualisation d’équilibre, δ le taux d’impatience, g le taux de croissance nominal par période de l’économie et R le coefficient d’aversion des consommateurs au risque de déséquilibre inter-temporel de leur consommation.

En admet tant une valeur très faible pour δ et une valeur proche de l’unité pour R, on voit que le taux de croissance nominal de l’économie constitue une valeur de référence pour le taux d’actualisation d’équilibre. Ce taux d’actualisation d’équilibre, comme cela a été précisé, est le taux sans risque qui doit être utilisé pour valoriser des actifs sans risque ; si l’on s’intéresse à des actifs risqués, il faut bien sûr lui adjoindre une prime de risque.

Dans le contexte actuel, la relation de Ramsey permet d’apprécier l’ampleur des effets des politiques non conventionnelles des banques centrales qui ont fait émerger sur les marchés financiers un taux sans risque proche de 0%.

LE TAUX D’ACTUALISATION DE LONG TERME

La notion de taux d’actualisation d’équilibre étant précisée, on peut maintenant aborder la question de la structure des taux d’actualisation selon leur terme.

On vient de voir que le taux d’actualisation est déterminé par le taux d’impatience des consommateurs, leur coefficient d’aversion R et les anticipations de taux de croissance de l’économie. En considérant comme négligeable le taux d’impatience et en supposant que le coefficient d’aversion reste inchangé au cours du temps, cela confère un rôle très important aux perspectives économiques : le taux d’actualisation selon la maturité va principalement refléter les attentes des agents économiques en matière de taux de croissance futur.

Ainsi, si l’on anticipe une croissance économique à un taux constant g, la structure des taux selon le terme sera plate. Si l’on anticipe une accélération de la croissance (une croissance du taux de croissance), la structure des taux sera croissante avec la maturité. En revanche, si l’on s’attend à une décélération de la croissance, la structure des taux sera décroissante.

On perçoit ainsi la fonction informative de la structure des taux selon le terme qui permettra de renseigner l’observateur sur les anticipations des opérateurs du marché financier en matière d’anticipations du taux de croissance de l’économie.

ON VOIT AUSSI QUE LA PÉNALISATION DES CASH FLOWS DE LONG TERME PAR LE PROCESSUS D’ACTUALISATION N’EST PAS INÉLUCTABLE.

Lorsque les perspectives économiques sont baissières, la structure des taux devrait être décroissante. Mais il ne faut pas forcément en déduire que cette forme de la yield curve est synonyme de catastrophe annoncée. Elle peut très bien correspondre à un retour à la normale après une période de surchauffe. Par exemple, pour revenir à l’actualité, si le taux de croissance de l’économie est particulièrement élevé du fait de phénomènes de rattrapage, et marque un écart important par rapport au taux de croissance soutenable dans le long terme, la structure des taux devrait être décroissante et le taux d’actualisation court plus élevé que le taux d’actualisation applicable à des échéances plus lointaines.

Ce n’est que l’action des banques centrales, surtout perceptible sur des échéances courtes, qui empêche aujourd’hui une telle observation statistique.


Quand amélioration ne rime pas forcément avec simplification

Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Advisor, Accuracy

Aujourd’hui, même si l’affirmation vaut plus pour les pays développés que pour les émergents, le panorama économique est a priori plus favorable. L’épidémie est en passe de se transformer en endémie, la reprise économique est considérée comme devant être durable, avec un retard de croissance accumulé durant la crise de la COVID le plus souvent comblé, et, dernier point et non des moindres, les prix accélèrent.

Ce dernier mouvement est même spectaculaire, avec un glissement sur un an des prix à la consommation, passé respectivement en l’espace de deux ans (du début 2020 au début 2022) de 1,9% à 7,5% aux Etats-Unis et de 1,4% à 5,1% en Zone Euro. Qui plus est cette accélération est plus forte et dure plus longtemps que l’idée qu’on se faisait des implications de la réouverture d’une économie, préalablement entravée par les mesures prises de santé publique, sur le profil des prix.

Face à ces dynamiques sur le double front sanitaire et de l’économie réelle, les regards jetés sur les initiatives à prendre par les banques centrales ont évolué. Les marchés de capitaux réclament une normalisation rapide des politiques monétaires : arrêt de la hausse, puis réduction, de la taille des bilans et retour des taux directeurs vers des niveaux jugés plus normaux. Ce qui ne va pas sans créer tant des pressions haussières et des déformations des courbes des taux que de pertes de repères sur les marchés d’actions.

Faisons à ce stade un petit rappel, pour prendre la mesure du chemin à éventuellement parcourir. Durant la crise épidémique, les principales banques centrales occidentales (Fed américaine, BCE en Zone Euro, Banque du Japon et Banque d’Angleterre) ont accepté de gonfler de façon spectaculaire la taille de leur bilan. A elles-quatre, le ratio bilan/PIB est passé de 36% au début de 2020 à 60% à la fin de 2021. Il s’agit de la contrepartie des obligations achetées et des liquidités injectées dans les systèmes bancaires respectifs. Dans le même temps, les taux directeurs ont été positionnés ou maintenus le plus bas possible (en fonction des caractéristiques économiques et financières propres à chaque pays ou zone) : à +0,25% aux Etats-Unis, à -0,50% en Zone Euro, à-0,10% au Japon et à +0,10% au Royaume-Uni. Ce couple d’initiatives répondait à l’ambition d’assurer les conditions monétaires et financières les plus favorables. Il a « complémenté » les actions prises par les administrations publiques : souvent des prêts garantis aux entreprises et des mesures de chômages techniques en parallèle d’un soutien important à l’économie (de l’ordre de 4,5 points de PIB en moyenne pour la zone OCDE ; attention les deux types de mesures peuvent en partie se recouper).

Essayons maintenant de poser le débat de politique monétaire. Le net rebond de la croissance économique en 2021, le sentiment largement partagé que l’activité se maintiendra sur une tendance haussière et une évolution des prix qui a du mal à rentrer dans le rang forment un tout qui justifie de démarrer le processus de normalisation du réglage monétaire. Bien sûr, le calendrier et le rythme dépendent des conditions propres à chaque géographie.

IL FAUT TOUTEFOIS AVOIR CONSCIENCE DU CARACTÈRE « ORIGINAL » DE LA SITUATION ACTUELLE.

La dynamique inflationniste du moment n’est pas avant tout le reflet d’une demande trop forte, qui viendrait buter sur des capacités d’offre pleinement utilisées. Elle traduit plutôt, et pour beaucoup, des appareils de production et de distribution qui ne peuvent fonctionner à un régime optimal, à cause de la désorganisation induite par la crise épidémique et parfois aussi par les réponses apportées par les politiques publiques. Ce retour à la normale, si possible rapidement, est une nécessité ; sauf à accepter des pertes durables de capacités d’offre. A ce titre, il faut être attentif à ce que le chemin vers la neutralité monétaire ne soit pas emprunté avec une « vitesse » excessive. Au risque sinon d’une perte de portance de la croissance économique et d’un brusque décrochage des marchés financiers, qui feraient l’un et l’autre s’éloigner du but recherché.

Un autre point, même s’il est d’une facture plus classique, doit être mentionné. L’accélération des prix à la consommation n’est pas sans incidence sur les ménages. Elle grignote leur pouvoir d’achat et agit négativement sur leur confiance ; toutes choses qui militent en faveur d’un ralentissement de la consommation privée et, par-delà, de l’activité économique.

IL Y A ICI UN ÉLÉMENT SUPPLÉMENTAIRE EN FAVEUR DU GRADUALISME DANS LA CONDUITE DE CE PROCESSUS DE NORMALISATION MONÉTAIRE.

Comment les deux « grandes » banques centrales, que sont la Fed américaine et la BCE européenne, s’y prennent-elles pour tracer leur chemin sur cette piste, balisée d’un côté par l’impatience des marchés de capitaux et de l’autre par la nécessaire prise en compte du caractère original du moment présent et du doigté que cela implique dans la conduite de la politique monétaire ?

Il reste alors à observer une certaine « marche en crabe » de la Fed et de la BCE. Expliquons-nous et commençons par la banque centrale américaine. La phrase-clé du communiqué publié au sortir du plus récent comité de politique monétaire du 26 janvier est sans doute la suivante : « Avec l’inflation bien supérieur à 2 % et un marché du travail vigoureux, le comité s’attend à ce qu’il soit bientôt approprié de relever la fourchette cible du taux des fonds fédéraux ». Sans surprise, le taux directeur a bien été relevé de 25 centimes le 16 mars, et comme il n’y a plus de forward guidance (guidage prospectif), le rythme de la normalisation monétaire sera data dependent (calé sur l’image de l’économie dessinée par les indicateurs conjoncturels les plus récemment publiés). Dans un tout premier temps, l’attention portera prioritairement sur le profil des prix. Puis, l’importance accordée au profil de l’activité ira croissante.

Le marché, avec l’idée qu’il se fait de la croissance et de l’inflation, est prompt à anticiper un rythme rapide de remontée du taux directeur. La Fed, après avoir donné son aval à l’initialisation du mouvement, tente d’en contrôler le tempo. Ce qui n’est pas très facile !

Passons à la BCE. Le marché a retenu deux choses de la réunion du Conseil des gouverneurs du 3 février : les risques concernant les évolutions à venir de l’inflation sont orientés à la hausse et la possibilité d’une hausse du taux directeur dès cette année n’est pas écartée.

Bien sûr, l’analyse proposée était davantage balancée et depuis tant Christine Lagarde que certains autres membres du Conseil, comme François Villeroy de Galhau, s’emploient à modérer des anticipations de marché sans doute considérées comme excessives.

On le perçoit bien ; tout va être question de bon calendrier et de bon rythme dans cet exercice de normalisation qui démarre. In medio stat virtus, nous rappelle Aristote. Mais oh combien la déclinaison peut être difficile !

IMPACT DE L’INVASION DE L’UKRAINE PAR LA RUSSIE :
NÉCESSAIRE RÉVISION DU DIAGNOSTIC CONJONCTUREL DANS UN SENS MOINS FAVORABLE


Le monde hors Russie, singulièrement l’Europe, ne « passera pas entre les gouttes ». La poursuite de l’accélération des prix et un repli de la confiance en sont les ingrédients principaux. Ainsi, le prix du pétrole brut a augmenté de plus de 30% (+35 dollars par baril) depuis le début des opérations militaires et celui du gaz « européen » a presque doublé. De même, il n’est pas possible d’extrapoler le rebond des indices PMI de beaucoup de pays en février ; ce n’est plus que de l’histoire ancienne. La croissance va ralentir et l’inflation se faire plus vive ; avec des Etats-Unis moins pénalisés que la Zone Euro.

Il est possible que la vigilance (la prudence) doive être encore plus grande. Ce nouveau choc (dont l’ampleur n’est pas encore connu) vient ébranler un système économique toujours convalescent : la crise épidémique, suivie d’un difficile rééquilibrage offre –demande qui crée une dynamique haussière des prix inusitée si on prend comme référence les décennies les plus récentes. Sa résistance est-elle plus faible à ce titre ?

• Dans ces conditions, la normalisation monétaire se fera plus graduelle qu’anticipée. Les banques centrales devraient « enjamber » le renchérissement des produits énergétiques (et aussi alimentaires) et se focaliser davantage sur la dynamique des prix hors ces deux composantes ; ce qu’on appelle le noyau dur. L’hypothèse la plus probable est que celui-ci connaisse un tempo moins marqué qu’escompté ; avant tout du fait d’une demande moins bien orientée.


Lire la troisième édition de Accuracy Talks Straight >

Economic brief: what the figures tell us (#11)

In light of the current context, this month’s edition of the Economic Brief will focus on the relationship between war and the economy. In particular, we will look into links between the two; we will delve into economic theory in relation to war; and we will examine some of the impacts of the ongoing crisis in Ukraine on the world economy.

Analyse financière et évaluation d’entreprise: nouvel ouvrage de Bruno Husson

Bruno Husson, docteur d’État en Finance et Associé honoraire chez Accuracy, publie un nouvel ouvrage en janvier 2022 sur l’analyse financière et l’évaluation d’entreprise. Une double approche théorique et pratique novatrice.

Paru le 5 janvier aux éditions Presses Universitaires de France (PUF), le nouveau livre de Bruno Husson, Analyse financière et évaluation d’entreprise, propose une approche renouvelée de l’analyse financière et de l’évaluation d’entreprise, à la fois dense sur le plan théorique et riche sur le plan pratique.

Accuracy conseille Boralex

Accuracy a réalisé les travaux de due diligence financière pour Boralex dans le cadre de son accord avec Energy Infrastructure Partners pour accompagner la mise en œuvre de son Plan stratégique en France.

Accuracy advises Boralex

Accuracy conducted financial due diligence for Boralex in the context of its agreement with Energy Infrastructure Partners to support the implementation of its Strategic Plan in France.

Economic brief: what the figures tell us (#10)

In this first edition of the Economic Brief in 2022, we look into some of the significant factors currently affecting the global economy. We start with COVID-19, its development, and a new mentality taking hold. We then move on to the Purchasing Managers Index to see what it tells us of the level of confidence in economic activity across three major zones. Finally, we take a closer look at inflation and the structural developments that are set to affect prices in the future.

Accuracy supported House of HR in performing the financials due diligence in the context of the acquisition of TMI

Accuracy supported House of HR with the acquisition of the Dutch company TMI, a company specialised in secondment and recruitment in health care. With the TMI acquisition, House of HR aims to increase its presence in the healthcare sector a market in which the group has long wanted to position itself on a larger scale. The acquisition of TMI is a significant step in realizing the objective for setting up a specialized branch of HR services for health care within the group.

Corporate Investigations 2022 – Sixth Edition

Our partners Morgan Heavener, Frédéric Loeper, and Darren Mullins authored an Expert Analysis Chapter for the International Comparative Legal Guide – Corporate Investigations 2022. The chapter, New Frontiers in Compliance Due Diligence: Data Analytics and AI-Based Approaches to Reviewing Acquisition Targets, shares their insights regarding the increasing regulatory and practical requirements for conducting compliance-related due diligence and more sophisticated ways to approach such due diligence.

You can read the full chapter here.

To access the full edition, click here.

COVID-19 – A message from our partners

Dear clients, partners and friends,

In these critical and unprecedented circumstances that we are all experiencing, our priority is to preserve the health of our teams, whilst continuing our activity with the same exacting standards and high quality that you have come to know.

Some of our offices in Asia have been affected for several months already and have demonstrated the resilience of our firm. We put in place the organisation and IT and communications systems necessary for them to remain perfectly operational, and these have now been extended to all of our locations worldwide.

Our work continues on all our engagements without exception, as we continue to meet your needs globally. Of course, we remain ready to assist you in making the decisions relevant and necessary for the current situation, as well as when normal activity will resume.

We hope that you and your loved ones stay safe in this exceptional situation, and that your teams and companies are able to face these challenges in the best of conditions. We assure you of our unfailing support.

The Accuracy partners


Click here to see some short examples of the services that we are able to provide in times of crisis.

Economic brief: what the figures tell us (#9)

For this last edition of the Economic Brief in 2021, we will take a look back at the year and see how it developed across three different zones that drive the global economy: the United States, China and the eurozone. For each of these zones, we will observe the forecast development, as predicted by the Bloomberg Consensus, of three key elements of their economies: GDP growth, inflation and budget deficit.

FOURTEEN ACCURACY EXPERTS ARE RECOGNISED AS LEADING ARBITRATION EXPERT WITNESSES IN THE WHO’S WHO LEGAL: ARBITRATION 2022

Accuracy is pleased to announce that fourteen of its experts have been named among the leading Arbitration Expert Witnesses in the Who’s Who Legal: Arbitration 2022.

Through nominations from peers and clients, the following Accuracy experts have been recognised as the leading names in the field:

Guido Althaus
Nicolas Barsalou
Nicolas Bourdon
Laura Cózar
Jean-Baptiste de Courcel
Hervé de Trogoff
Giovanni Foti
Damien Gros
Juan SáezRanked “Most highly regarded” in the future leaders list. One of 7 experts to be ranked in this category globally and only expert ranked in this category in the Middle East and Asia.
Eduard Saura
Christophe Schmit
Delphine Sztermer
Anthony Theau-Laurent
Erik van Duijvenvoorde

Who’s Who Legal identifies the foremost legal practitioners and consulting experts in business law based upon comprehensive, independent research. Entry into their guides is based solely on merit.


Accuracy’s forensic, litigation and arbitration experts combine technical skills in corporate finance, accounting, financial modelling, economics and market analysis with many years of forensic and transaction experience. We participate in different forms of dispute resolution, including arbitration, litigation and mediation. We also frequently assist in cases of actual or suspected fraud. Our expert teams operate on the following basis:

• An in-depth assessment of the situation;
• An approach which values a transparent, detailed and well-argued presentation of the economic, financial or accounting issues at the heart of the case;
• The work is carried out objectively with the intention to make it easier for the arbitrators to reach a decision;
• Clear, robust written expert reports, including concise summaries and detailed backup;
• A proven ability to present and defend our conclusions orally.

Our approach provides for a more comprehensive and richer response to the numerous challenges of a dispute. Additionally, our team includes delay and quantum experts, able to assess time related costs and quantify financial damages related to dispute cases on major construction projects.

Accuracy Talks Straight #3

For our third edition of Accuracy Talks Straight, Frédéric Recordon discusses business and economic developments in China, before letting Romain Proglio introduce us to Amiral Technologies, a start-up specialised in disruptive technology. We then analyse the development of the hydrogen industry with Jean-François Partiot and Hervé de Trogoff.
Sophie Chassat, philosopher and partner at Wemean, explores Chinese society “as one”. And finally, we look closer at the numbers with Bruno Martinaud, Entrepreneurship Academic Director at Ecole Polytechnique, as well as at the macroeconomic and microeconomic risk in China with Hervé Goulletquer, our senior economic adviser.


SOMMAIRE


Editorial

Frédéric Recordon
Partner, Accuracy

GOVERNING A GREAT COUNTRY IS LIKE COOKING A SMALL FISH1

At first glance, everything seems to be going well in China. The country has overcome the COVID-19 pandemic, its economy has regained momentum, and it seems to be entering a new era of prosperity, one that European businesses present in the country should be able use to good advantage.

However, upon reading the 14th Five-Year Plan (2021–2025), troubling signs of the country starting to turn in on itself are becoming evident, allowing considerable doubt to linger over the country’s future growth trajectory.

After 40 years of modernisation, economic reform and opening up to the world, the Chinese economy has reached c. USD 10k in GDP per capita, a level similar to that of Japan and South Korea after equivalent 40-year periods of economic growth in these countries in the past. However, for the last five years, Chinese growth has been significantly running out of steam, and this trend may well continue if the country chooses insulation over the openness practised since Deng Xiaoping.

The Dual Circulation policy, the core of the 14th Plan, seems to prioritise the autonomy of the domestic market (internal circulation) over openness to foreign trade and investment (external circulation), despite the reassuring words of President Xi during the opening of the China International Import Expo in Shanghai on 4 November 2020.

The fact that several sectors key to Chinese development, such as the internet, energy and education sectors, have recently been taken in hand and that a growing role is being attributed to public companies – despite their low efficiency and productivity – to the detriment of a highly dynamic private sector are testament to the thinking behind such strict economic control. They also demonstrate a major turning point in the recent economic history of the country. President Xi clearly owned this turning point when he stated: “the invisible hand [market forces] and the visible hand [government intervention] must be used correctly. (…) In China, the firm direction of the Party constitutes the fundamental guarantee”.2

The European Chamber of Commerce in China in its 2021/2022 Position Paper dated 23 September 2021 expressed its concern about an insular withdrawal and urged the Chinese government to continue its work of reform and opening up to foreign companies.

The months to come will give an indication of China’s future trajectory. We can hazard that the country will be governed like a small fish is cooked, something President Xi likened to walking carefully across a thin sheet of ice.3

____________

1 President Xi Jinping quoting the Book of the Way and its Virtue (Dao De Jing, , 道德经), The Governance of China, p.493

2 President Xi Jinping, speech during the 15th session of the Political Bureau of the XVIII Central Committee of the Communist Party, The Governance of China, p.137

3 President Xi Jinping, interview with BRICS correspondents, 19 March 2013

Amiral Technologies

Romain Proglio
Partner, Accuracy

On 21 October 2021, Amiral Technologies announced its first round of fundraising totalling €2.8m. This represents an initial success for the start-up, founded in 2018 in Grenoble on the basis of an observation shared by numerous industrial players: how can we reliably predict breakdowns?

A spin-off of the CNRS, Amiral Technologies is based on almost 10 years of university research in artificial intelligence and automation & control theory. The company has successfully developed disruptive technology: from sensors installed on machines, detecting physical signals such as electric current, vibrations or humidity, algorithms make it possible to generate general health indicators for the equipment. These health indicators are then interpreted by unsupervised machine learning algorithms. They make it possible to identify the causes of breakdowns most likely to take place.

Unlike the majority of other solutions on the market, this solution (named DiagFit), which makes use of machine learning, does not require the history of breakdowns identified on a piece of equipment to be able to use artificial intelligence. Indeed, the algorithm is adapted to a specific use case in order to define a normalised functioning environment for the equipment.

More precise, quicker, and independent of the sensors themselves, the technology is already in use with SMEs and mid-sized businesses, as well as with large industrial groups such as Valéo, Airbus, Daher, Vinci and Thales.

The predictive maintenance market benefits from sustained growth dynamics, driven by an industrial base equipped with more and more sensors, a need to optimise inventories of spare parts and, of course, a greater need to avoid any costly shutdown in the production chain.

Amiral Technologies now aims to become the top supplier for the European market. The fundraising will enable it to strengthen its technical and commercial team, as well as to accelerate the development of DiagFit and its scientific and technological research.


Accelerating development in the hydrogen sector

Jean-François Partiot
Partner,
Accuracy

Hervé de Trogoff
Partner,
Accuracy

For some years now, hydrogen has been presented as the miraculous solution to develop clean transport and energy storage on a large scale. The combustion of hydrogen, which produces energy, water and oxygen only, is indeed 100% clean, and we can certainly glimpse its promising potential. However, the carbon footprint of its production varies considerably depending on its origin. The hydrogen sector is not necessarily clean, and it is only decarbonised hydrogen that is stirring up so much desire.

• Historically, industrial hydrogen – also known as grey hydrogen – has been produced from fossil fuels, and its environmental record is unsatisfactory, or even poor, depending on whether the CO2 emitted during its production is captured and stored. Grey hydrogen is an inevitable by-product of oil refining (desulphurisation of oil) and ammonia production.
Today, more than 90% of the hydrogen produced in the world is grey, but this proportion is destined to fall significantly to the benefit of green and blue hydrogen.

• All eyes are now on the production of green hydrogen, that is, the hydrogen produced from decarbonised electricity (solar, wind, nuclear, and hydro power).

• Some researchers are also looking into the exploitation of white hydrogen, that is, hydrogen sourced naturally. As surprising as it may seem, knowledge of the existence and extraction possibilities of this native hydrogen is still rudimentary. For the time being, white hydrogen remains the dream of a few pioneers. Related knowledge is inchoate and accessible volumes unknown. Its research cycle and potential development will be long. If this path were to prove economically viable, it would most likely be explored by large oil producers thanks to their in-situ extraction expertise.

– Finally, big oil and petrochemical groups are calling for a transitory phase using blue hydrogen. Produced using natural gas, it can be considered clean as long as all related CO2 and methane emissions are captured.

For the decades to come, green and blue hydrogen will be the major areas of development in the energy industry. But this ambition is confronted with three constraints.

Constraint 1: Demand versus capacity

‘Nothing is more imminent than the impossible’
– Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Environmental expectations for the industry seem excessive today, as the requirements for energy production capacity are of titanic proportions if we are to consider decarbonising a significant share of the market. As a reminder, global energy consumption mostly serves industry (29%), ground and air transport (29%) and residential consumption (21%).

Currently, the hydrogen sector meets less than 2% of energy needs.

To cover global energy consumption in 2030, an area the size of France would need to be covered in photovoltaic solar panels, according to Land Art Generator (US). And that is assuming that these panels benefit from optimal and constant sunlight and that they give maximum yield. As observed yields from solar power today stand at 25%, the logical conclusion would mean using an area four times the size of France to achieve the same goal.

These figures help us to understand why the great powers are now considering reinvesting massively in the nuclear industry and securing their access to uranium deposits across the world. A huge redeployment of nuclear power for electricity generation might make it possible to solve the environmental equation in 50 years (climate change – IPCC objectives). Various significant issues remain to be resolved, of course, including questions of nuclear safety and the treatment and storage of nuclear waste. But given that the time scale to resolve these issues is measured more in the hundreds, if not the thousands of years, rather than in 50, some will quickly weigh up the consequences and decide.

Constraint 2: A development cycle for major projects that cannot be shortened

‘The difference between the possible and the impossible can be found in determination’
– Gandhi

Current electrolysis processes offer a low energy yield, and the green hydrogen sector will require the construction of gigafactories, the technology, design and scale-up of which are not yet fully appreciated.

Despite all attempts to accelerate the process, we are talking about major projects, and their development cycles are standardised. There needs to be a 10 to 20 MW prototype / test site, before any 100 MW sites – currently the target entry capacity to play in the big league – can be launched.

These large projects follow the classic cycle in major project engineering as presented below. If we take as an example the liquefaction process for natural gas, which is the most similar in terms of engineering and construction complexity to that of large-scale electrolysis, between five and seven years would be necessary to go from the feasibility study to the commissioning of the test site.

Cycle d’ingénierie de grands projets

Then, if we say that feedback from the test site will be provided in parallel to the conception and feasibility studies of a gigafactory, we would need to consider five to seven additional years before the gigafactory could begin its operations. It would be reasonable to imagine that a 100 MW factory would be composed of independent units, whose installation would be sequential over an additional period of 12 to 24 months. Based on this plan, we would need to count around 15 years in total to create a gigafactory with an effective production of 100 MW.

To accelerate the development cycle of these types of project, the following levers could be activated:

• Directly selecting qualified service providers, minimising the tender phase. Based on our experience in similar major projects, the ‘open book’ selection solution makes it possible to reduce the tender offer time, all whilst maintaining effective control over capital expenditure. This lever could facilitate the truncation of the tender phase, potentially winning around 12 months.

• Beginning construction of the prototype and obtaining in parallel the administrative and environmental authorisations for the gigafactory site.  This lever would make it possible to reduce the development cycle by a few months.

• Starting up the factory capacity sequentially, segmented in discrete units, and by doing so, advancing the beginning of production by up to a year.

• Launching engineering and construction of the gigafactory in parallel to the prototype and managing the feedback on process optimisation through retrofitting (a rare disruptive approach but efficient).

• Accelerating the engineering and construction cycles by financing a more expensive project and mobilising more resources at a given moment.

For even greater urgency, more disruptive levers could be applied:

• Removing certain administrative and environmental constraints and the related delays.

• Developing tools (IT and AI), making it possible to accelerate the engineering stage significantly.

• Working on smaller interlinked units able to be serially produced.

In all these cases, we must accept that the costs and risks resulting from the use of an acceleration lever will be higher than those of a traditional development cycle.

Constraint 3: Financial constraint

‘If you have to ask how much it costs, you can’t afford it’
– John Pierpont Morgan

Developing the green hydrogen sector requires massive and sustained investment. The major powers have finally understood that fact and acted: more than 30 countries have announced investments totalling almost 300 billion euros to develop the sector.

However, these substantial investments still seem insufficient when confronting the carbon behemoth menacing the planet. Based on the calculations of the Energy Transition Commission shared in April 2021, 15 trillion dollars must be invested between 2021 and 2050 to decarbonise the global energy market. That comes to 50 times more than what has been announced to date.

As Bill Gates said via his Catalyst initiative from Breakthrough Energy, the scientific, political and economic worlds have already proved their ability to support innovation in energy and to give it a favourable development framework. That is what happened in the past few decades with solar and wind energy and lithium-ion batteries.

But in 2021, we no longer have the luxury to wait decades. We must collectively make a quantum leap to accelerate decarbonisation innovation and its implementation. We are talking about not only investing in proportions that far exceed investments made in the past but also freeing ourselves of historical financial IRR models. Here is a short list of some of the actions that may be put in place:

• Sourcing a colossal amount of capital from central banks, countries, financial institutions, great fortunes and philanthropists.

• Also targeting a significant proportion of personal savings (pension funds, mutual investment funds, etc.).

• Enhancing incentives for decarbonisation technologies by implementing systems more powerful than carbon taxes and credits (the effect of which is spot), for example, using specific interest rates based on a project’s future environmental impact.

• Not providing a financial return (IRR) for some of the capital invested. The expected return would become mostly environmental…

– Breakthrough Energy, a non-profit organisation, raised over a billion euros for its Catalyst initiative at the end of September 2021.

• Putting in place environmental reporting that is as reliable as financial reporting.

Investments in decarbonisation are revolutionising finance through their magnitude and the nature of their expected return; this will be environmental, not financial.


‘As one’

Sophie Chassat
Philosopher, Partner at Wemean

Culturally, China functions as our opposite: its customs, mental models and rituals are highly compelling to us. To our great benefit, the philosopher François Jullien insists, seeing in Chinese thought a valuable means of decentring ourselves and leaving behind the certainties of Western culture – particularly binarism, a lack of nuance and the constant use of force in the name of logic.1 That in no way means that we must consider this other perspective to be right, but experiencing absolute difference, as the other perspective invites us to do, often allows us to choose new paths for ourselves.

Amongst the most fascinating elements, there is the way in which Chinese society always seems to react ‘as one’: collective expression there is unanimous. Of course, the nature of the political regime and its current toughening stance with regard to the expression of any form of singularity or standing out from the crowd have much to do with it. Nevertheless, China has always represented the polar opposite of individualism and communitarianism, which, in the West, have led to the loss of a sense of public interest.

To picture this collective movement in its entirety, we might think of Hobbes’ Leviathan with the famous image on the frontispiece of the work presenting the body of the king composed of the masses of individuals from the kingdom, who, if we look more closely, have no faces, their being fully turned towards the face of the sovereign. This detail reminds us of the danger of using organic metaphors to talk about societies: they may well claim to mean that if the parts are there for the whole, the whole is also there for the parts; however, often the parts end up cowering before the whole…

A hive or even a murmuration (the natural phenomenon seen with large flocks of birds or schools of fish moving in concert, with each animal seeming to follow some form of choreography laid out in advance, without any individual leading the movement) might also provide, at first glance, images suggestive of the collective movements of which the Chinese are capable. But, of course, we must not linger over such animal analogies; the ethnologist Claude Lévi-Strauss rightly considered them to be the beginning of barbarousness, tantamount as they are to denying the human quality of the other culture.2

Though none of these metaphors depicts a desirable model, the fact remains that this way of functioning ‘as one’ holds up a negative mirror to us: how can we overcome the impasse of the ‘society of individuals’ (Norbert Elias), which characterises a model of Western society where any higher interest seems to have been lost? How can we find something like a collective impulse? What if our individual impulses made us want a collective impulse in the first place?3 Leaving behind individualism does not mean annihilating the individual; it is an invitation to stop looking only at oneself and to move towards shared achievements. Between the West and China, between atomism and holism, a third path is possible.

____________

1 François Jullien, A treatise on efficacy (1996).

2 Claude Lévi-Strauss, Race and History (1952).

3 Sophie Chassat has recently released Élan Vital: Antidote philosophique au vague à l’âme contemporain, Calmann-Lévy editions (October 2021).


Numbers lie

Bruno Martinaud
Entrepreneurship Academic Director, Ecole Polytechnique

It’s 2009. Kevin Systrom (soon joined by his co-founder, Mike Krieger) is working on a geolocation social media project, similar to Foursquare. Together, they manage to convince Baseline Ventures and Andressen Horowitz to invest $500,000 in the project. This enables them to dedicate themselves full time to the adventure. A year later, Burbn is launched in the form of an iPhone application that makes it possible to save locations, plan outings, post photos, etc. The application is downloaded massively, but the verdict is not quite what they hope for: the users, beta-testers, don’t like it at all. Too cluttered, too messy, it’s confusing and most of them have stopped using it. A patent failure. All this being very normal, the entrepreneur digests the feedback, learns from the experience and moves on to a new adventure. The metrics are bad – duly noted. And yet Kevin Systrom doesn’t stop there because he notices something that at first glance seems trivial: the photo sharing function (one amongst so many others) seems to be used by a small number of regular users… He investigates, questions these users and realises that the small group loves this function (and only this one). Instagram is born, all from the happy realisation that a small number of people, hidden in the multitudes that didn’t like Burbn, use the app for one reason.

This story highlights a counter-intuitive principle for the educated manager: numbers lie in the beginning. Burbn’s metrics were catastrophic. The rational response would have been to acknowledge that fact and move on to the next project. But a weak signal was hiding there, showing potential.

The story of Viagra follows a similar pattern. Pfizer laboratories were developing a blood pressure regulator, which was in phase III of testing before gaining market authorisation. If we remember that the development of a new molecule represents an investment of approximately $1bn, that would mean around $700m to $800m had already been invested in the project. Pressure was therefore high to achieve this authorisation as soon as possible. It just so happened that someone in Pfizer’s teams noticed that some people in the test sample hadn’t returned the pills that should have been left over as part of the procedure given to them. Who pays attention to that? Some incoherent data, with no direct link to the topic (efficiency of the molecule)… A few abnormal results in a table of 300 columns and 100,000 rows… And yet, by investigating, this person realised that those who weren’t giving back the extra pills all shared the same characteristics of age and sex. Pfizer then realised that this blood pressure regulator had an unexpected side effect so interesting that the project changed course entirely.

A simple observation lies behind these examples that we can compare endlessly an innovative project, a start-up that is just starting up, they are adventures to be explored.

Exploring first means remembering that you don’t know what works and what doesn’t work in your idea. It’s recognising that you’re facing complex issues, that you don’t quite grasp all the variables of these issues and don’t understand how the variables interact, or their effects.

From that starting point comes the following consequence, the subject of this article: you don’t know what to measure and you don’t know the meaning of what you’re measuring. This goes both ways: what might initially seem like poor metrics, as in the case of Burbn, can hide a gem. But the opposite is also true. We have recently worked with a start-up developing a smart object for well-being, aimed at the public at large. The company quickly sold some tens of thousands of the product, and based on this success, raised funds to scale up quickly and control the market, only to find that its sales, far from growing, plateaued and then fell. It turns out that 30,000 products being sold wasn’t the sign of massive and rapid market adoption, but the majority of the addressable market. After a period of trying different things, questioning themselves, doubting and researching, the start-up’s founders finally found a B2B market, centred on a service offer based on the smart object. The irony is that its strong early figures didn’t mean that it had found its market.

These observations lead to two simple and practical recommendations, which seem almost trivial when writing them, but they can be slippery in their application:

1. Remember that the only way to progress in a complex environment is through experimentation. Trial and error. Keep what works. Eliminate what doesn’t. Understanding will come later. Pixar has always applied this empirical approach to the extreme. From a starting concept, Pixar tests everything. There have been, throughout the production process, 43,536 variations of Nemo, 69,562 of Ratatouille and 98,173 of Wall-E… That’s the path between initial idea and final success.

2. Give yourself the tools to ‘capture’ weak signals, that is, put strategies in place to save what seems irrelevant in one instant but which could be useful later. Remember that at a given moment, in the first life of an innovative project, no one is able to determine what is relevant and what is not.

Unfortunately, the human mind is wired in such a way as to try to give early meaning to the information that comes to it, which leads to neglecting the need to test everything (because we’ve already understood) and to filtering out noise (because we’ve already identified the signal)… These are probably the two deadly sins of the innovator or the start-up entrepreneur.


China – when one risk may hide another!

Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Adviser, Accuracy

When we look at the Chinese economy, in this early autumn, two dynamics emerge. First, from a macroeconomic perspective, we can note very disappointing GDP growth during the third quarter of the year. As was forecast by Bloomberg’s economic consensus, one of the most viewed forecast aggregates, performance barely got off the mark (+0.2%, quarter on quarter). This phenomenon may not last long, however, and from the fourth quarter, the country may return to its previous performance level (around 1.5%, quarter on quarter). But even if we accept the forecasts, is there not a risk of being taken by surprise again in the near future?

China: the slump may not last

Second, and this time from a microeconomic perspective, we have the Evergrande issue. It is the country’s largest property developer, which, over time, has transformed into a type of conglomerate. It is unable to pay its debts and coupons that are falling due. And it is fair to say that its debts are high: over 300 billion dollars in total or almost 2% of the country’s GDP, including 90 billion in financial debt (bank loans and bonds), 150 billion in commercial debt (including deposits from off-plan buyers), and 80 billion off balance sheet (essentially investment products issued by the company). Available cash would only cover 40% of its short-term debt (maturing within 12 months). Before starting a carve-out process for some of the assets, it was estimated that a fire sale would involve a debt haircut of some 50%.

We should note that the Evergrande case, however iconic and high profile the company may be, is not unique. Other developers are putting themselves in defaulting positions, even when they are able to pay what they owe. They use the toughening regulation, which hinders their business development considerably and try to ensure their creditors are the ones with the losing hand. Or, to put it another way, they try to create enough scandal or public difficulty to force the public authorities to revise their attitude.

Evergrande: asset prices clearly falling

A major credit event in a suddenly deteriorated economic environment gives us a more worrying outlook: what if China was no longer a centre of stability in a world that very much needs one?

The Xi Administration (based on the name of President Xi Jinping) has started a restructuring/consolidation phase for the country’s economy, with the aim of reinforcing its fundamentals. It no doubt considered the international environment to be favourable to such an action. The decline of the COVID-19 pandemic, the return of global growth and a theoretically more cooperative US president should create sufficiently promising external demand conditions to compensate any ‘blunders’ in domestic spending that the reforms (even if conceived and implemented well) would doubtless cause.

However, as is often the case in life, things have not gone exactly according to plan.

The Beijing government started with three areas: real estate, debt and inequality. Work on all three must be reduced.

Let us start with real estate. Its total weight in the Chinese economy, taking into account upstream and downstream effects, is estimated at between 25% and 30%. The scale is reminiscent of what we saw in Spain or Ireland before the Great Recession in 2008. Might we do well to take this similarity as an invitation to prevent rather than to cure, after the real estate bubble bursts? Moreover, real estate needs have become less significant (apart from the considerable wave of migration from the countryside to cities), whilst prices have skyrocketed. An average of 42 m2 per person in a dwelling is perfectly comparable to what we can see in major Western European countries. However, the ratio of property prices to average household income is over 40 in Beijing or Shanghai (2018 figures). Though comparable to the ratio for Hong Kong, it is significantly higher than its equivalent for London or Paris (around 20), not to mention New York (12). This level observed in large Chinese cities is only understandable if economic growth and demographics remain sufficiently strong to justify a highly dynamic demand for property and therefore to maintain expectations of property price increases. We know that the demographics are not heading in this direction, and we sense that the potential GDP growth is slowing…

Preventing the formation of a real estate bubble could be seen as a pressing obligation. First, is it not necessary to preserve the financial system’s ability to take the initiative at a time of structural change in the economy? The system’s exposure to the real estate sector is significant, between 50% and 60% of total bank loans granted. Second, less investment in real estate would facilitate, all else being equal, increased investment in capital goods or intellectual property products. Measures of both productivity and economic growth could find themselves improved

Credit exposure in real estate sector

Chine: heading towards a new breakdown in fixed investment?

Now let us talk about debt. Debt in non-financial corporates is high; in fact, it is among the highest in major countries around the globe. It represents 160% of the country’s GDP. Of course, we can highlight the much more reasonable levels noted for households and public authorities and therefore talk about a very ‘presentable’ average. But embarking on economic reforms, which will most certainly create losers as well as the expected winners, starting from a situation with a high level of debt in the corporate sector is uncomfortable. This is even more so the case when we consider the ricochet effect on the financial system of the difficulties facing a certain number of companies.

We must therefore understand that the importance given to greater stability in the financial system risks weighing on economic growth. As we highlighted previously, this is another reason to ensure more efficient investment signposting – towards where there is the greatest potential for long-lasting and inclusive growth.

Debt of non-financial Chinese companies among the highest

The thread that runs from real estate to debt leads to inequalities. These inequalities are too great, and Beijing is aiming to reduce them. The Chinese real estate ‘adventure’ described above, in addition to the development of the technology sector and its consequent outperformance of the market, has contributed to an increase in inequalities, now putting them at the same level as in the United States. The richest 1% holds 30% of the wealth of all households in China, a proportion that doubled in the 20 years from 1995 to 2015. For Beijing, this development seems to carry the risk of challenging political stability. Is it not understandable then that the middle class should call for a reduction in these inequalities?

China: inegality becoming a political matter

No sooner said than done, we might wish to say; after all, President Xi is not one to dawdle. A large number of measures have been implemented to effect this triple ambition. Many relate to the technology and real estate sectors and encourage greater moral standards from the country’s citizens. The table below provides a summary of the changes.

China: a significant catalogue of party/government initiatives

But all this has a destabilising effect! Ensuring parallelism between the impact of decisions that will suppress growth (real estate, finance and technology) and the impact of those to come that will boost it (aim to increase added-value content of the Chinese economy, less dependence on foreign countries, and ‘healthy’ stimulation of domestic demand, to mention what we currently understand) will require significant skill in economic policy. Even in what remains a relatively nationalised system, it will be quite a challenge. Benefitting from a favourable external environment is certainly a ‘pressing obligation’ for Beijing today – never mind if, at least at first, it flies in the face of the ambition to become more autonomous from the rest of the world. Are we there yet?

Not really – with such a complicated international environment (from the COVID-19 pandemic, which has not yet disappeared, to persistent Sino-American tensions, not to mention a global economy that is still recovering), it will be necessary to arbitrate between the desirable (domestic reforms) and the possible (degrees of freedom offered by the economic context and external policies). That will mean accelerating when possible and slowing down when necessary. It will be an arduous task for the person in charge of economic policy, not to mention ensuring that the business community falls in line. It will not always be easy!


Read the second edition of Accuracy Talks Straight >

Accuracy Talks Straight #3 – Economic point of view

China – when one risk may hide another!

Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Adviser, Accuracy

When we look at the Chinese economy, in this early autumn, two dynamics emerge. First, from a macroeconomic perspective, we can note very disappointing GDP growth during the third quarter of the year. As was forecast by Bloomberg’s economic consensus, one of the most viewed forecast aggregates, performance barely got off the mark (+0.2%, quarter on quarter). This phenomenon may not last long, however, and from the fourth quarter, the country may return to its previous performance level (around 1.5%, quarter on quarter). But even if we accept the forecasts, is there not a risk of being taken by surprise again in the near future?

China: the slump may not last

Second, and this time from a microeconomic perspective, we have the Evergrande issue. It is the country’s largest property developer, which, over time, has transformed into a type of conglomerate. It is unable to pay its debts and coupons that are falling due. And it is fair to say that its debts are high: over 300 billion dollars in total or almost 2% of the country’s GDP, including 90 billion in financial debt (bank loans and bonds), 150 billion in commercial debt (including deposits from off-plan buyers), and 80 billion off balance sheet (essentially investment products issued by the company). Available cash would only cover 40% of its short-term debt (maturing within 12 months). Before starting a carve-out process for some of the assets, it was estimated that a fire sale would involve a debt haircut of some 50%.

We should note that the Evergrande case, however iconic and high profile the company may be, is not unique. Other developers are putting themselves in defaulting positions, even when they are able to pay what they owe. They use the toughening regulation, which hinders their business development considerably and try to ensure their creditors are the ones with the losing hand. Or, to put it another way, they try to create enough scandal or public difficulty to force the public authorities to revise their attitude.

Evergrande: asset prices clearly falling

A major credit event in a suddenly deteriorated economic environment gives us a more worrying outlook: what if China was no longer a centre of stability in a world that very much needs one?

The Xi Administration (based on the name of President Xi Jinping) has started a restructuring/consolidation phase for the country’s economy, with the aim of reinforcing its fundamentals. It no doubt considered the international environment to be favourable to such an action. The decline of the COVID-19 pandemic, the return of global growth and a theoretically more cooperative US president should create sufficiently promising external demand conditions to compensate any ‘blunders’ in domestic spending that the reforms (even if conceived and implemented well) would doubtless cause.

However, as is often the case in life, things have not gone exactly according to plan.

The Beijing government started with three areas: real estate, debt and inequality. Work on all three must be reduced.

Let us start with real estate. Its total weight in the Chinese economy, taking into account upstream and downstream effects, is estimated at between 25% and 30%. The scale is reminiscent of what we saw in Spain or Ireland before the Great Recession in 2008. Might we do well to take this similarity as an invitation to prevent rather than to cure, after the real estate bubble bursts? Moreover, real estate needs have become less significant (apart from the considerable wave of migration from the countryside to cities), whilst prices have skyrocketed. An average of 42 m2 per person in a dwelling is perfectly comparable to what we can see in major Western European countries. However, the ratio of property prices to average household income is over 40 in Beijing or Shanghai (2018 figures). Though comparable to the ratio for Hong Kong, it is significantly higher than its equivalent for London or Paris (around 20), not to mention New York (12). This level observed in large Chinese cities is only understandable if economic growth and demographics remain sufficiently strong to justify a highly dynamic demand for property and therefore to maintain expectations of property price increases. We know that the demographics are not heading in this direction, and we sense that the potential GDP growth is slowing…

Preventing the formation of a real estate bubble could be seen as a pressing obligation. First, is it not necessary to preserve the financial system’s ability to take the initiative at a time of structural change in the economy? The system’s exposure to the real estate sector is significant, between 50% and 60% of total bank loans granted. Second, less investment in real estate would facilitate, all else being equal, increased investment in capital goods or intellectual property products. Measures of both productivity and economic growth could find themselves improved

Credit exposure in real estate sector

Chine: heading towards a new breakdown in fixed investment?

Now let us talk about debt. Debt in non-financial corporates is high; in fact, it is among the highest in major countries around the globe. It represents 160% of the country’s GDP. Of course, we can highlight the much more reasonable levels noted for households and public authorities and therefore talk about a very ‘presentable’ average. But embarking on economic reforms, which will most certainly create losers as well as the expected winners, starting from a situation with a high level of debt in the corporate sector is uncomfortable. This is even more so the case when we consider the ricochet effect on the financial system of the difficulties facing a certain number of companies.

We must therefore understand that the importance given to greater stability in the financial system risks weighing on economic growth. As we highlighted previously, this is another reason to ensure more efficient investment signposting – towards where there is the greatest potential for long-lasting and inclusive growth.

Debt of non-financial Chinese companies among the highest

The thread that runs from real estate to debt leads to inequalities. These inequalities are too great, and Beijing is aiming to reduce them. The Chinese real estate ‘adventure’ described above, in addition to the development of the technology sector and its consequent outperformance of the market, has contributed to an increase in inequalities, now putting them at the same level as in the United States. The richest 1% holds 30% of the wealth of all households in China, a proportion that doubled in the 20 years from 1995 to 2015. For Beijing, this development seems to carry the risk of challenging political stability. Is it not understandable then that the middle class should call for a reduction in these inequalities?

China: inegality becoming a political matter

No sooner said than done, we might wish to say; after all, President Xi is not one to dawdle. A large number of measures have been implemented to effect this triple ambition. Many relate to the technology and real estate sectors and encourage greater moral standards from the country’s citizens. The table below provides a summary of the changes.

China: a significant catalogue of party/government initiatives

But all this has a destabilising effect! Ensuring parallelism between the impact of decisions that will suppress growth (real estate, finance and technology) and the impact of those to come that will boost it (aim to increase added-value content of the Chinese economy, less dependence on foreign countries, and ‘healthy’ stimulation of domestic demand, to mention what we currently understand) will require significant skill in economic policy. Even in what remains a relatively nationalised system, it will be quite a challenge. Benefitting from a favourable external environment is certainly a ‘pressing obligation’ for Beijing today – never mind if, at least at first, it flies in the face of the ambition to become more autonomous from the rest of the world. Are we there yet?

Not really – with such a complicated international environment (from the COVID-19 pandemic, which has not yet disappeared, to persistent Sino-American tensions, not to mention a global economy that is still recovering), it will be necessary to arbitrate between the desirable (domestic reforms) and the possible (degrees of freedom offered by the economic context and external policies). That will mean accelerating when possible and slowing down when necessary. It will be an arduous task for the person in charge of economic policy, not to mention ensuring that the business community falls in line. It will not always be easy!

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #3 – The Academic Insight

Numbers lie

Bruno Martinaud
Entrepreneurship Academic Director, Ecole Polytechnique

It’s 2009.  Kevin Systrom (soon joined by his co-founder, Mike Krieger) is working on a geolocation social media project, similar to Foursquare. Together, they manage to convince Baseline Ventures and Andressen Horowitz to invest $500,000 in the project. This enables them to dedicate themselves full time to the adventure. A year later, Burbn is launched in the form of an iPhone application that makes it possible to save locations, plan outings, post photos, etc. The application is downloaded massively, but the verdict is not quite what they hope for: the users, beta-testers, don’t like it at all. Too cluttered, too messy, it’s confusing and most of them have stopped using it. A patent failure. All this being very normal, the entrepreneur digests the feedback, learns from the experience and moves on to a new adventure. The metrics are bad – duly noted. And yet Kevin Systrom doesn’t stop there because he notices something that at first glance seems trivial: the photo sharing function (one amongst so many others) seems to be used by a small number of regular users… He investigates, questions these users and realises that the small group loves this function (and only this one). Instagram is born, all from the happy realisation that a small number of people, hidden in the multitudes that didn’t like Burbn, use the app for one reason.

This story highlights a counter-intuitive principle for the educated manager: numbers lie in the beginning. Burbn’s metrics were catastrophic. The rational response would have been to acknowledge that fact and move on to the next project. But a weak signal was hiding there, showing potential.

The story of Viagra follows a similar pattern. Pfizer laboratories were developing a blood pressure regulator, which was in phase III of testing before gaining market authorisation. If we remember that the development of a new molecule represents an investment of approximately $1bn, that would mean around $700m to $800m had already been invested in the project. Pressure was therefore high to achieve this authorisation as soon as possible. It just so happened that someone in Pfizer’s teams noticed that some people in the test sample hadn’t returned the pills that should have been left over as part of the procedure given to them. Who pays attention to that? Some incoherent data, with no direct link to the topic (efficiency of the molecule)… A few abnormal results in a table of 300 columns and 100,000 rows… And yet, by investigating, this person realised that those who weren’t giving back the extra pills all shared the same characteristics of age and sex. Pfizer then realised that this blood pressure regulator had an unexpected side effect so interesting that the project changed course entirely.

A simple observation lies behind these examples that we can compare endlessly an innovative project, a start-up that is just starting up, they are adventures to be explored.

Exploring first means remembering that you don’t know what works and what doesn’t work in your idea. It’s recognising that you’re facing complex issues, that you don’t quite grasp all the variables of these issues and don’t understand how the variables interact, or their effects.

From that starting point comes the following consequence, the subject of this article: you don’t know what to measure and you don’t know the meaning of what you’re measuring. This goes both ways: what might initially seem like poor metrics, as in the case of Burbn, can hide a gem. But the opposite is also true. We have recently worked with a start-up developing a smart object for well-being, aimed at the public at large. The company quickly sold some tens of thousands of the product, and based on this success, raised funds to scale up quickly and control the market, only to find that its sales, far from growing, plateaued and then fell. It turns out that 30,000 products being sold wasn’t the sign of massive and rapid market adoption, but the majority of the addressable market. After a period of trying different things, questioning themselves, doubting and researching, the start-up’s founders finally found a B2B market, centred on a service offer based on the smart object. The irony is that its strong early figures didn’t mean that it had found its market.

These observations lead to two simple and practical recommendations, which seem almost trivial when writing them, but they can be slippery in their application:

1. Remember that the only way to progress in a complex environment is through experimentation. Trial and error. Keep what works. Eliminate what doesn’t. Understanding will come later. Pixar has always applied this empirical approach to the extreme. From a starting concept, Pixar tests everything. There have been, throughout the production process, 43,536 variations of Nemo, 69,562 of Ratatouille and 98,173 of Wall-E… That’s the path between initial idea and final success.

2. Give yourself the tools to ‘capture’ weak signals, that is, put strategies in place to save what seems irrelevant in one instant but which could be useful later. Remember that at a given moment, in the first life of an innovative project, no one is able to determine what is relevant and what is not.

Unfortunately, the human mind is wired in such a way as to try to give early meaning to the information that comes to it, which leads to neglecting the need to test everything (because we’ve already understood) and to filtering out noise (because we’ve already identified the signal)… These are probably the two deadly sins of the innovator or the start-up entrepreneur.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #3 – The Cultural Corner

‘As one’

Sophie Chassat
Philosopher, Partner at Wemean

Culturally, China functions as our opposite: its customs, mental models and rituals are highly compelling to us. To our great benefit, the philosopher François Jullien insists, seeing in Chinese thought a valuable means of decentring ourselves and leaving behind the certainties of Western culture – particularly binarism, a lack of nuance and the constant use of force in the name of logic.1 That in no way means that we must consider this other perspective to be right, but experiencing absolute difference, as the other perspective invites us to do, often allows us to choose new paths for ourselves.

Amongst the most fascinating elements, there is the way in which Chinese society always seems to react ‘as one’: collective expression there is unanimous. Of course, the nature of the political regime and its current toughening stance with regard to the expression of any form of singularity or standing out from the crowd have much to do with it. Nevertheless, China has always represented the polar opposite of individualism and communitarianism, which, in the West, have led to the loss of a sense of public interest.

To picture this collective movement in its entirety, we might think of Hobbes’ Leviathan with the famous image on the frontispiece of the work presenting the body of the king composed of the masses of individuals from the kingdom, who, if we look more closely, have no faces, their being fully turned towards the face of the sovereign. This detail reminds us of the danger of using organic metaphors to talk about societies: they may well claim to mean that if the parts are there for the whole, the whole is also there for the parts; however, often the parts end up cowering before the whole…

A hive or even a murmuration (the natural phenomenon seen with large flocks of birds or schools of fish moving in concert, with each animal seeming to follow some form of choreography laid out in advance, without any individual leading the movement) might also provide, at first glance, images suggestive of the collective movements of which the Chinese are capable. But, of course, we must not linger over such animal analogies; the ethnologist Claude Lévi-Strauss rightly considered them to be the beginning of barbarousness, tantamount as they are to denying the human quality of the other culture.2

Though none of these metaphors depicts a desirable model, the fact remains that this way of functioning ‘as one’ holds up a negative mirror to us: how can we overcome the impasse of the ‘society of individuals’ (Norbert Elias), which characterises a model of Western society where any higher interest seems to have been lost? How can we find something like a collective impulse? What if our individual impulses made us want a collective impulse in the first place?3 Leaving behind individualism does not mean annihilating the individual; it is an invitation to stop looking only at oneself and to move towards shared achievements. Between the West and China, between atomism and holism, a third path is possible.

____________

1 François Jullien, A treatise on efficacy (1996).

2 Claude Lévi-Strauss, Race and History (1952).

3 Sophie Chassat has recently released Élan Vital: Antidote philosophique au vague à l’âme contemporain, Calmann-Lévy editions (October 2021).

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #3 – Industry Insight

Accelerating development in the hydrogen sector

Jean-François Partiot
Partner,
Accuracy

Hervé de Trogoff
Partner,
Accuracy

For some years now, hydrogen has been presented as the miraculous solution to develop clean transport and energy storage on a large scale. The combustion of hydrogen, which produces energy, water and oxygen only, is indeed 100% clean, and we can certainly glimpse its promising potential. However, the carbon footprint of its production varies considerably depending on its origin. The hydrogen sector is not necessarily clean, and it is only decarbonised hydrogen that is stirring up so much desire.

• Historically, industrial hydrogen – also known as grey hydrogen – has been produced from fossil fuels, and its environmental record is unsatisfactory, or even poor, depending on whether the CO2 emitted during its production is captured and stored. Grey hydrogen is an inevitable by-product of oil refining (desulphurisation of oil) and ammonia production.
Today, more than 90% of the hydrogen produced in the world is grey, but this proportion is destined to fall significantly to the benefit of green and blue hydrogen.

• All eyes are now on the production of green hydrogen, that is, the hydrogen produced from decarbonised electricity (solar, wind, nuclear, and hydro power).

• Some researchers are also looking into the exploitation of white hydrogen, that is, hydrogen sourced naturally. As surprising as it may seem, knowledge of the existence and extraction possibilities of this native hydrogen is still rudimentary. For the time being, white hydrogen remains the dream of a few pioneers. Related knowledge is inchoate and accessible volumes unknown. Its research cycle and potential development will be long. If this path were to prove economically viable, it would most likely be explored by large oil producers thanks to their in-situ extraction expertise.

– Finally, big oil and petrochemical groups are calling for a transitory phase using blue hydrogen. Produced using natural gas, it can be considered clean as long as all related CO2 and methane emissions are captured.

For the decades to come, green and blue hydrogen will be the major areas of development in the energy industry. But this ambition is confronted with three constraints.

Constraint 1: Demand versus capacity

‘Nothing is more imminent than the impossible’
– Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Environmental expectations for the industry seem excessive today, as the requirements for energy production capacity are of titanic proportions if we are to consider decarbonising a significant share of the market. As a reminder, global energy consumption mostly serves industry (29%), ground and air transport (29%) and residential consumption (21%).

Currently, the hydrogen sector meets less than 2% of energy needs.

To cover global energy consumption in 2030, an area the size of France would need to be covered in photovoltaic solar panels, according to Land Art Generator (US). And that is assuming that these panels benefit from optimal and constant sunlight and that they give maximum yield. As observed yields from solar power today stand at 25%, the logical conclusion would mean using an area four times the size of France to achieve the same goal.

These figures help us to understand why the great powers are now considering reinvesting massively in the nuclear industry and securing their access to uranium deposits across the world. A huge redeployment of nuclear power for electricity generation might make it possible to solve the environmental equation in 50 years (climate change – IPCC objectives). Various significant issues remain to be resolved, of course, including questions of nuclear safety and the treatment and storage of nuclear waste. But given that the time scale to resolve these issues is measured more in the hundreds, if not the thousands of years, rather than in 50, some will quickly weigh up the consequences and decide.

Constraint 2: A development cycle for major projects that cannot be shortened

‘The difference between the possible and the impossible can be found in determination’
– Gandhi

Current electrolysis processes offer a low energy yield, and the green hydrogen sector will require the construction of gigafactories, the technology, design and scale-up of which are not yet fully appreciated.

Despite all attempts to accelerate the process, we are talking about major projects, and their development cycles are standardised. There needs to be a 10 to 20 MW prototype / test site, before any 100 MW sites – currently the target entry capacity to play in the big league – can be launched.

These large projects follow the classic cycle in major project engineering as presented below. If we take as an example the liquefaction process for natural gas, which is the most similar in terms of engineering and construction complexity to that of large-scale electrolysis, between five and seven years would be necessary to go from the feasibility study to the commissioning of the test site.

Cycle d’ingénierie de grands projets

Then, if we say that feedback from the test site will be provided in parallel to the conception and feasibility studies of a gigafactory, we would need to consider five to seven additional years before the gigafactory could begin its operations. It would be reasonable to imagine that a 100 MW factory would be composed of independent units, whose installation would be sequential over an additional period of 12 to 24 months. Based on this plan, we would need to count around 15 years in total to create a gigafactory with an effective production of 100 MW.

To accelerate the development cycle of these types of project, the following levers could be activated:

• Directly selecting qualified service providers, minimising the tender phase. Based on our experience in similar major projects, the ‘open book’ selection solution makes it possible to reduce the tender offer time, all whilst maintaining effective control over capital expenditure. This lever could facilitate the truncation of the tender phase, potentially winning around 12 months.

• Beginning construction of the prototype and obtaining in parallel the administrative and environmental authorisations for the gigafactory site.  This lever would make it possible to reduce the development cycle by a few months.

• Starting up the factory capacity sequentially, segmented in discrete units, and by doing so, advancing the beginning of production by up to a year.

• Launching engineering and construction of the gigafactory in parallel to the prototype and managing the feedback on process optimisation through retrofitting (a rare disruptive approach but efficient).

• Accelerating the engineering and construction cycles by financing a more expensive project and mobilising more resources at a given moment.

For even greater urgency, more disruptive levers could be applied:

• Removing certain administrative and environmental constraints and the related delays.

• Developing tools (IT and AI), making it possible to accelerate the engineering stage significantly.

• Working on smaller interlinked units able to be serially produced.

In all these cases, we must accept that the costs and risks resulting from the use of an acceleration lever will be higher than those of a traditional development cycle.

Constraint 3: Financial constraint

‘If you have to ask how much it costs, you can’t afford it’
– John Pierpont Morgan

Developing the green hydrogen sector requires massive and sustained investment. The major powers have finally understood that fact and acted: more than 30 countries have announced investments totalling almost 300 billion euros to develop the sector.

However, these substantial investments still seem insufficient when confronting the carbon behemoth menacing the planet. Based on the calculations of the Energy Transition Commission shared in April 2021, 15 trillion dollars must be invested between 2021 and 2050 to decarbonise the global energy market. That comes to 50 times more than what has been announced to date.

As Bill Gates said via his Catalyst initiative from Breakthrough Energy, the scientific, political and economic worlds have already proved their ability to support innovation in energy and to give it a favourable development framework. That is what happened in the past few decades with solar and wind energy and lithium-ion batteries.

But in 2021, we no longer have the luxury to wait decades. We must collectively make a quantum leap to accelerate decarbonisation innovation and its implementation. We are talking about not only investing in proportions that far exceed investments made in the past but also freeing ourselves of historical financial IRR models. Here is a short list of some of the actions that may be put in place:

• Sourcing a colossal amount of capital from central banks, countries, financial institutions, great fortunes and philanthropists.

• Also targeting a significant proportion of personal savings (pension funds, mutual investment funds, etc.).

• Enhancing incentives for decarbonisation technologies by implementing systems more powerful than carbon taxes and credits (the effect of which is spot), for example, using specific interest rates based on a project’s future environmental impact.

• Not providing a financial return (IRR) for some of the capital invested. The expected return would become mostly environmental…

– Breakthrough Energy, a non-profit organisation, raised over a billion euros for its Catalyst initiative at the end of September 2021.

• Putting in place environmental reporting that is as reliable as financial reporting.

Investments in decarbonisation are revolutionising finance through their magnitude and the nature of their expected return; this will be environmental, not financial.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #3 – Start-up stories

Amiral Technologies

Romain Proglio
Partner, Accuracy

On 21 October 2021, Amiral Technologies announced its first round of fundraising totalling €2.8m. This represents an initial success for the start-up, founded in 2018 in Grenoble on the basis of an observation shared by numerous industrial players: how can we reliably predict breakdowns?

A spin-off of the CNRS, Amiral Technologies is based on almost 10 years of university research in artificial intelligence and automation & control theory. The company has successfully developed disruptive technology: from sensors installed on machines, detecting physical signals such as electric current, vibrations or humidity, algorithms make it possible to generate general health indicators for the equipment. These health indicators are then interpreted by unsupervised machine learning algorithms. They make it possible to identify the causes of breakdowns most likely to take place.

Unlike the majority of other solutions on the market, this solution (named DiagFit), which makes use of machine learning, does not require the history of breakdowns identified on a piece of equipment to be able to use artificial intelligence. Indeed, the algorithm is adapted to a specific use case in order to define a normalised functioning environment for the equipment.

More precise, quicker, and independent of the sensors themselves, the technology is already in use with SMEs and mid-sized businesses, as well as with large industrial groups such as Valéo, Airbus, Daher, Vinci and Thales.

The predictive maintenance market benefits from sustained growth dynamics, driven by an industrial base equipped with more and more sensors, a need to optimise inventories of spare parts and, of course, a greater need to avoid any costly shutdown in the production chain.

Amiral Technologies now aims to become the top supplier for the European market. The fundraising will enable it to strengthen its technical and commercial team, as well as to accelerate the development of DiagFit and its scientific and technological research.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #3 – One Partner, One View

Editorial

Frédéric Recordon
Partner, Accuracy

GOVERNING A GREAT COUNTRY IS LIKE COOKING A SMALL FISH1

At first glance, everything seems to be going well in China. The country has overcome the COVID-19 pandemic, its economy has regained momentum, and it seems to be entering a new era of prosperity, one that European businesses present in the country should be able use to good advantage.

However, upon reading the 14th Five-Year Plan (2021–2025), troubling signs of the country starting to turn in on itself are becoming evident, allowing considerable doubt to linger over the country’s future growth trajectory.

After 40 years of modernisation, economic reform and opening up to the world, the Chinese economy has reached c. USD 10k in GDP per capita, a level similar to that of Japan and South Korea after equivalent 40-year periods of economic growth in these countries in the past. However, for the last five years, Chinese growth has been significantly running out of steam, and this trend may well continue if the country chooses insulation over the openness practised since Deng Xiaoping.

The Dual Circulation policy, the core of the 14th Plan, seems to prioritise the autonomy of the domestic market (internal circulation) over openness to foreign trade and investment (external circulation), despite the reassuring words of President Xi during the opening of the China International Import Expo in Shanghai on 4 November 2020.

The fact that several sectors key to Chinese development, such as the internet, energy and education sectors, have recently been taken in hand and that a growing role is being attributed to public companies – despite their low efficiency and productivity – to the detriment of a highly dynamic private sector are testament to the thinking behind such strict economic control. They also demonstrate a major turning point in the recent economic history of the country. President Xi clearly owned this turning point when he stated: “the invisible hand [market forces] and the visible hand [government intervention] must be used correctly. (…) In China, the firm direction of the Party constitutes the fundamental guarantee”.2

The European Chamber of Commerce in China in its 2021/2022 Position Paper dated 23 September 2021 expressed its concern about an insular withdrawal and urged the Chinese government to continue its work of reform and opening up to foreign companies.

The months to come will give an indication of China’s future trajectory. We can hazard that the country will be governed like a small fish is cooked, something President Xi likened to walking carefully across a thin sheet of ice.3

____________

1 President Xi Jinping quoting the Book of the Way and its Virtue (Dao De Jing, , 道德经), The Governance of China, p.493

2 President Xi Jinping, speech during the 15th session of the Political Bureau of the XVIII Central Committee of the Communist Party, The Governance of China, p.137

3 President Xi Jinping, interview with BRICS correspondents, 19 March 2013

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Economic brief: what the figures tell us (#8)

A topic much in the news of late is inflation. Indeed, its recent rise is dominating market news, and its effects are being felt globally. This edition of the Economic Brief will see us look into this striking rise in inflation and what patterns might be taking shape. We will also look into how inflation and pay rises interact, as well as how they might affect future employee compensation negotiations.

Accuracy Talks Straight #3 – Regard sur l’économie

La Chine, ou quand un risque peut en cacher un autre !

Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Advisor, Accuracy

Si on s’intéresse en ce début d’automne à l’économie chinoise, deux dynamiques se dégagent. D’abord et du côté de la macroéconomie, une vraie déception côté croissance du PIB a été enregistré au cours du troisième trimestre. Celle-ci n’a été que de 0,2% T sur T. Pour mémoire, le consensus des économistes réalisé par l’agence Bloomberg, l’un des agrégateurs de prévisions les plus regardés, tablait à la mi-septembre sur une progression de plus de 1%. Le phénomène ne serait cependant pas durable et dès le quatrième trimestre le pays retrouverait une performance tendancielle (autour de 1,5%, T sur T). Même en acceptant l’augure, n’y a-t-il pas un risque d’être une nouvelle fois surpris négativement à brève échéance ?

Chine : le passage à vide ne durerait pas

Ensuite, en focalisant cette fois-ci sur la microéconomie, il y a le dossier Evergrande. Il s’agit du plus grand promoteur immobilier, qui le temps passant s’est transformé en une sorte de conglomérat. Il n’arrive pas à honorer des dettes ou des coupons arrivant à échéance. Il faut dire que le montant des premières est élevé : plus de 300 milliards de dollars au total ou près de 2% du PIB du pays (dont 90 milliards de dette financière – crédit bancaire et obligation –, 150 milliards de dette commerciale, y compris les dépôts des acquéreurs de logements à construire et 80 milliards de hors bilan – avant tout les produits de placements émis par la société –). Le cash disponible ne couvrirait que 40% de la dette à court terme (maturité inférieure à 12 mois). Avant le démarrage du processus de séparation d’une partie des actifs, on estimait qu’une « vente à la casse » impliquerait une dévalorisation de la dette (haircut) de quelque 50%.

Il faut remarquer que le cas d’Evergrande, aussi emblématique et médiatisé que la société soit, n’est pas unique. D’autres promoteurs se mettent en situation de défaut ; même quand ils sont en mesure de payer ce qu’ils doivent. Ils arguent d’un durcissement de la réglementation, qui entrave fortement le bon développement de leurs affaires et… tentent de passer le mistigri à leurs créanciers. Ou, pour mieux dire, de créer suffisamment de scandale et d’embarras pour forcer les pouvoirs publics à revoir leur attitude.

Evergrande : des prix d’actif franchement à la baisse

Un évènement de crédit majeur dans un environnement économique brusquement dégradé et voilà le regard qui devient plus inquiet : et si la Chine n’était plus un pôle de stabilité dans un monde qui en a bien besoin ?

En fait, l’Administration Xi (du nom du Président Xi Jinping) a bien ouvert une phase de restructuration/consolidation de l’économie du pays ; avec comme ambition de renforcer ses fondamentaux. Sans doute pensait-elle que l’environnement international était propice à cela. Le reflux de l’épidémie de COVID, le retour de la croissance mondiale et un Président des Etats-Unis a priori plus coopératif devaient créer les conditions d’une demande extérieure suffisamment porteuse pour compenser les « couacs » au niveau des dépenses domestiques que les réformes, même bien inspirées et bien menées, ne manqueraient pas d’occasionner.

Disons que, comme c’est souvent le cas dans la vie, le déroulé des choses n’est pas exactement comme prévu !

LE GOUVERNEMENT DE PÉKIN A OUVERT TROIS CHANTIERS : L’IMMOBILIER, L’ENDETTEMENT ET LES INÉGALITÉS. TOUS DOIVENT ÊTRE RÉDUITS.

Commençons par l’immobilier. Son poids total dans l’économie, en prenant en compte les effets induits amont et aval, est estimé entre 25% et 30%. L’ordre de grandeur évoque ce qu’on a pu connaître en Espagne ou en Irlande avant la grande récession de 2008. N’y a-t-il pas dans ce rappel une invitation à prévenir plutôt qu’à guérir une fois la bulle immobilière éclatée ? De plus et surtout, les besoins sont devenus moins prégnants (sauf importante vague de migration des campagnes vers le villes), alors même que les prix sont devenus vraiment élevés. Une moyenne de 42 m2 par habitant d’un logement se compare tout à fait à ce qu’on peut connaître dans les grands pays d’Europe de l’ouest. Le ratio prix de l’immobilier sur revenu moyen des ménages dépasse les 40 à Pékin ou Shanghai (chiffres de 2018). S’il se compare à Hong Kong, il est très inflaté par rapport à Londres ou Paris (autour de 20), sans même parler de New York (12). Le niveau observé dans les grandes villes chinoises ne peut se comprendre que si la croissance économique et la démographie restent suffisamment fortes pour justifier une demande de biens immobiliers toujours très dynamique et donc maintenir des anticipations de hausse de prix de l’immobilier. On sait que la démographie n’ira pas dans ce sens et on sent que le potentiel de hausse du PIB va ralentissant.

Empêcher la formation d’une bulle immobilière peut être aussi perçue comme une ardente obligation. D’abord, préserver la capacité d’initiatives du système financier n’est-il pas une nécessité à un moment de changements structurels de l’économie engagés ? L’exposition de celui-ci sur le secteur immobilier est importante, entre 50% et 60% du total du crédit bancaire distribué. Ensuite, moins d’investissement immobilier permettrait, au moins toutes choses égales par ailleurs, d’augmenter l’effort porté sur celui en biens d’équipement ou en produits de la propriété intellectuelle. Le profil tant de la productivité que de la croissance économique pourrait s’en trouver améliorer.

Exposition de crédit au secteur immobilier

Passons à l’endettement. Celui des entreprises non-financières est élevé ; en fait parmi les plus élevés des pays qui comptent autour du globe. Ils représentent 160% du PIB du pays. On peut évidemment mettre en avant les niveaux beaucoup plus raisonnables enregistrés pour les ménages et les administrations publiques et ainsi insister sur une moyenne très « présentable ». Il n’empêche que se lancer dans des réformes économiques, qui ne manqueront pas de faire des perdants à côté des vainqueurs espérés, en partant d’une situation de dette importante dans le secteur des corporates, est inconfortable. Et encore plus si on prend aussi en compte l’effet de ricochet sur le système financier des difficultés rencontrées par un certain nombre d’entreprises.

On doit alors comprendre que l’importance donnée à une plus grande stabilité du système financier risque de peser sur la croissance économique. Raison de plus, comme on le soulignait précédemment, pour s’assurer d’un fléchage plus efficace de l’investissement : vers là où le potentiel de croissance durable et inclusive est le plus important.

Le fil qui passe de l’immobilier à l’endettement conduit aux inégalités. Elles sont trop élevées et Pékin ambitionne de les réduire. Ce qu’on vient de décrire concernant l’« aventure » de l’immobilier chinois, auquel il faut ajouter le développement de la Tech, avec son corolaire de surperformances boursières, a contribué à une augmentation qui les positionne aujourd’hui au niveau des Etats-Unis. Le 1% le plus riche détient 30% du patrimoine de l’ensemble des ménages. La part a doublé en 20 ans (de 1995 à 2015). Cette évolution apparaît, aux yeux de Pékin, come porteuse d’un risque de remise en cause de la stabilité politique. La classe moyenne n’appelle-t-elle pas de ses voeux, pour ce qu’on en comprend, une réduction de ces inégalités ?

Aussi dit, aussitôt fait ; pourrait-on avoir envie de dire. Le Président Xi n’est pas une personne à trainer. Un grand nombre de mesures ont été prises afin de rendre effective cette triple ambition. Elles concernent pour beaucoup les secteurs de la Tech et de l’immobilier et incitent à un comportement davantage moral de la part des citoyens. Le tableau ci-dessous propose une synthèse des changements engagés.

Tout ceci a un pouvoir de déstabilisation ! S’assurer du bon parallélisme, entre l’impact des décisions qui vont peser sur la croissance (immobilier, financement et Tech) et celles à venir qui doivent la doper (volonté d’augmenter le contenu en valeur ajoutée de l’économie chinoise, moindre dépendance de l’étranger et dynamisation « saine » de la demande intérieure, pour pointer ce qu’on comprend), va demander beaucoup de doigté de politique économique. Même dans un système encore assez étatisé, cela tient de la gageure. Bénéficier d’une environnement extérieur porteur est sans doute aujourd’hui une « ardente obligation » pour Pékin. Et tant pis si c’est contradictoire, au moins dans un premier temps, avec l’ambition de s’autonomiser davantage par rapport au reste du monde. En est-on là ?

Chine : vers une nouvelle décomposition de l’investissement fixe

Chine : des inégalités devenues une question politique

Une dette des entreprises chinoises non-financières parmi les plus élevés

Pas vraiment, avec un environnement international compliqué (de l’épidémie de COVID qui n’a pas disparu à la persistance des tensions sino-américaines en passant par une économie mondiale encore convalescente)… Il va falloir arbitrer entre le souhaitable (les réformes intérieures) et le possible (les degrés de liberté offerts par la conjoncture économique et politique extérieure). Ce qui voudra dire accélérer quand c’est possible et ralentir quand c’est nécessaire. La tâche est ardue pour le responsable de politique économique et son suivi par la communauté des affaires, pas toujours simple !

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #3 – L’angle académique

Les chiffres mentent

Bruno Martinaud
Responsable Académique Entrepreneuriat, Ecole Polytechnique

En 2009, Kevin Systrom (bientôt rejoint par son co-fondateur, Mike Krieger) travaille sur un projet de réseau social géolocalisé, proche de Foursquare. Ils réussissent à convaincre Baseline Ventures et Andressen Horowitz d’investir 500 000$ dans le projet. Ceci leur permet de s’investir à temps plein dans l’aventure. Un an plus tard Burbn est lancé sous la forme d’une application iPhone qui permettait d’enregistrer des lieux, de planifier des sorties, de poster des photos, etc. L’application est massivement téléchargée, mais le verdict est sans appel : les utilisateurs, beta-testeurs, n’aiment pas du tout. Trop encombrée, trop fouillie, ils s’y perdent et ont arrêté pour la plupart de l’utiliser. Echec patent. Rien que de très normal, l’entrepreneur, digère, en tire les enseignements et rebondit vers une nouvelle aventure. Les métriques sont mauvaises, dont acte. Et pourtant Kevin Systrom ne s’arrêta pas là, car il remarqua un fait d’apparence anodine, l’usage dans la fonction de partage de photos (une parmi tant d’autres) semblait être le fait d’un petit nombre d’utilisateurs réguliers… Il creusa, interrogea ces utilisateurs et se rendit compte que ce petit groupe adorait cette fonction (et seulement celle-ci). Instagram était né, de cette heureuse constatation qu’un petit nombre de personnes, cachées dans une majorité qui n’aimait pas Burbn, utilisaient l’app pour une seule raison.

Cette histoire met en évidence un principe contrenaturel pour le manager éduquée : les chiffres mentent au début. Les métriques de Burbn étaient catastrophiques… L’approche rationnelle est d’acter le fait et de passer à la suite… Mais s’y cachait un signal faible porteur de potentiel.

L’histoire du Viagra relève de la même séquence. Les laboratoires Pfizer développaient un régulateur de tension artérielle, lequel se trouvait en phase III dans le processus test préalable à l’autorisation de mise sur le marché.

Si l’on se rappelle que le développement d’une nouvelle molécule représente un investissement d’environ 1Mde, cela signifie qu’environ 700 à 800M$ ont déjà été engagés dans le projet. La pression est donc forte pour aboutir dès que possible à cette autorisation. Il se trouve que quelqu’un au sein des équipes de Pfizer remarqua que certaines personnes dans l’échantillon de test ne restituaient pas les pilules qu’ils n’auraient pas dû utiliser dans le cadre du protocole qui leur avait été assigné. Qui fait attention à cela. Quelques données incohérentes, sans lien direct avec le sujet : l’efficacité de la molécule. Quelques cellules atypiques dans un tableau de 300 colonnes par 100 000 lignes… Et pourtant, en creusant, cette personne a réalisé que ceux qui ne restituaient pas les pilules partageaient toutes les mêmes caractéristiques d’âge et de sexe…

Et Pfizer a ainsi réalisé que ce régulateur de la tension artérielle avait un effet secondaire insoupçonné, tellement intéressant que le projet a été réorienté dans cette direction.

Derrière ces exemples que l’on pourrait juxtaposer à l’infini, se trouve une observation simple : un projet innovant, une start-up qui démarrent sont des aventures exploratoires…Explorer c’est d’abord se rappeler que je ne sais pas ce qui marche et ne marche pas dans mon idée. C’est reconnaître que je suis confronté à des problématiques complexes dont je ne cerne pas les variables descriptives, ne comprends pas leurs interactions, ni effets.

De là, cette conséquence, objet du présent propos, je ne sais pas quoi mesurer, et je ne sais pas le sens de ce que je mesure. Et cela dans les deux sens, de mauvaises métriques a priori, tel que l’illustre Burbn, peuvent cacher une pépite. Mais l’inverse est également vrai. Nous avons récemment côtoyé une start-up qui développe un objet connecté pour le bien être à destination du grand public. Elle en a rapidement écoulé quelques dizaines de milliers, et forte de ce succès, a levé des fonds pour « scaler » rapidement et contrôler le marché… si ce n’est que les ventes, bien loin de croître, se sont stabilisées puis ont décliné. En fait ces 30 000 n’étaient pas le signe précurseur d’une adoption massive et rapide, mais l’essentiel du marché adressable. Après une période d’errement, d’interrogation, de doute et de recherche, elle a finalement trouvé un marché B2B, centré sur une offre de service, lequel s’appuie sur l’objet connecté.

Toute l’ironie de l’affaire est que de bons chiffres précoces ne signifie pas que l’on a trouvé son marché.

CES OBSERVATIONS DÉBOUCHENT SUR DEUX RECOMMANDATIONS PRATIQUES SIMPLES, PRESQUE TRIVIALE DANS LEUR EXPRESSION, MAIS GLISSANTE DANS LEUR APPLICATION :

1. Se rappeler que la seule méthode pour avancer dans un environnement complexe est l’expérimentation. Essai – Erreur. Retenir ce qui marche. Eliminer ce qui ne marche pas. La compréhension viendra plus tard. Cette approche empirique est appliquée depuis toujours à l’extrême par Pixar. A partir d’un concept de départ, Pixar teste tout. Il y a eu, tout au fil du processus de production, 43 536 variantes de Nemo, 69 562 de Ratatouille, et 98 173 de Wall-E… Voilà le chemin entre l’idée initiale et le succès final.

2. Se donner les moyens de « capter » les signaux faibles, c’est dire mettre en place des stratégies pour enregistrerce qui est non pertinent à l’instant présent mais qui pourra trouver un sens plus plus tard. Se rappeler qu’à l’instant présent, dans la première vie d’un projet innovant, nul n’est capable de distinguer le pertinent du non pertinent.

Malheureusement l’esprit humain est ainsi câblé qu’il lui est nécessaire d’essayer de donner un sens précoces aux informations qui lui parviennent, ce qui conduit ensuite à moins ressentir le besoin de tout tester (puisque l’on a compris) et à filtrer le bruit (puisque l’on a identifié le signal)… Là se situent probablement les deux péchés capitaux de l’innovateur ou de l’entrepreneur en phase de démarrage.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #3 – Côté culturel

Comme un seul homme

Sophie Chassat
Philosophe, Associée chez Wemean

Culturellement, la Chine fonctionne comme notre double inversé : moeurs, modèles mentaux et rituels nous y interpellent systématiquement. Pour notre plus grand bien, insiste le philosophe François Jullien qui voit dans la pensée chinoise un précieux décentrement pour se départir des certitudes de la culture occidentale – notamment binarisme, frontalité et constants passages en force au nom de la logique1. Cela ne signifie en rien qu’il faille donner raison à cette perspective autre, mais l’expérience de la différence absolue à laquelle elle nous convie nous permet souvent d’ouvrir de nouvelles voies pour nous-mêmes.

Parmi les éléments les plus fascinants, il y a cette façon dont la société chinoise semble toujours réagir « comme un seul homme » : l’expression du collectif y est unanime. Certes, la nature du régime politique et son durcissement actuel visà- vis de l’expression de toute singularité amenant à sortir du lot, y sont pour beaucoup. Mais il reste que la Chine nous oppose depuis toujours le contrepoint absolu à l’individualisme mais aussi au communautarisme qui, en Occident, ont conduit à faire disparaître le sens de l’intérêt général.

Pour se représenter ce mouvement collectif en bloc, on pense bien sûr au Léviathan de Hobbes, dont l’image célèbre du frontispice de l’ouvrage représente le corps du roi composé de la foule des individus du royaume … lesquels, si on y regarde de plus près, n’ont pas de visages, tournés tout entiers qu’ils sont vers la face du souverain. Détail qui rappelle le danger des métaphores organiques quand on les utilise pour parler des sociétés : elles ont beau prétendre signifier que, si les parties sont là pour le tout, le tout est là aussi pour les parties, il reste que bien souvent les parties n’ont qu’à s’écraser devant le tout…

Ruche, fourmilière ou encore « murmuration » (ce phénomène naturel des nuées d’oiseaux ou des bancs de poissons qui se déplacent de concert, chaque animal semblant suivre une chorégraphie tracée d’avance sans pourtant qu’aucun individu leader ne la dirige) nous donnent aussi de prime abord des images assez ajustées des mouvements collectifs dont sont capables les Chinois. Mais il faut bien vite se départir de ces analogies animales : l’ethnologue Claude Lévi-Strauss rappelait à juste titre qu’elles sont le début de la barbarie puisqu’elles reviennent à dénier la qualité humaine à l’autre culture2.

Si aucune de ces métaphores ne dessine un modèle souhaitable, il reste que cette façon de fonctionner « comme un seul homme » nous tend en négatif un miroir : comment sortir de l’impasse de la « société des individus » (Norbert Elias) qui caractérise un modèle de société occidentale d’où tout intérêt supérieur semble avoir disparu ? Comment retrouver quelque chose comme un élan collectif ? Et s’il s’agissait d’abord que nos élans individuels nous le fassent désirer3 ? Sortir de l’individualisme ne signifie pas annihiler les individus, mais les inviter à cesser de ne se tourner que vers soi pour s’élancer vers des réalisations communes. Entre l’Occident et la Chine, entre atomisme et holisme, une troisième voie est possible.

____________

1 François Jullien, Traité de l’efficacité (1996).

2 Claude Lévi-Strauss, Race et Histoire (1952).

3 Sophie Chassat vient de publier Élan Vital. Antidote philosophique au vague à l’âme contemporain, éditions Calmann-Lévy (octobre 2021)

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #3 – Zoom sectoriel

Accélerer la filière hydrogène

Jean-François Partiot
Associé,
Accuracy

Hervé de Trogoff
Associé,
Accuracy

Depuis quelques années, l’hydrogène est présenté comme la solution miracle pour développer les transports propres et permettre le stockage d’énergie à grande échelle.

La combustion finale de l’hydrogène, dégageant exclusivement énergie, eau et oxygène, est en effet 100% propre et laisse entrevoir un potentiel prometteur.

Le bilan carbone de sa production est en revanche extrêmement variable selon son origine. La filière hydrogène n’est pas nécessairement propre et seul l’hydrogène décarboné attise les convoitises.

– Historiquement, l’hydrogène industriel – ou « gris » – est produit à partir d’énergies fossiles carbonées et son bilan environnemental est insatisfaisant, voire mauvais, tant que le CO2 issu de sa production n’est pas capturé. L’hydrogène « gris » est un sous-produit « fatal » du raffinage pétrolier (désulfuration du pétrole) et de la production d’ammoniac. Plus de 90% de l’hydrogène produit dans le monde est « gris » et cette part est vouée à baisser drastiquement au profit des hydrogènes « vert » et « bleu ».

Toutes les attentions se concentrent aujourd’hui sur la production d’hydrogène « vert », i.e. produit à partir d’électricité décarbonée (solaire, éolien, nucléaire, hydraulique) ;

– Certains chercheurs veulent aussi croire en l’exploitation de l’hydrogène « blanc », c’est-à-dire d’origine naturelle. Aussi étonnant que cela puisse paraître, les connaissances sur l’existence et les possibilités d’extraction de cet hydrogène natif sont encore embryonnaires. L’hydrogène « blanc » reste pour l’instant le rêve de quelques pionniers. Les connaissances à son sujet sont embryonnaires, les volumes accessibles méconnus. Le cycle de recherche et d’éventuel développement sera long. Si jamais cette voie s’avérait économiquement viable, elle serait très probablement explorée par les grands énergéticiens pétroliers (métier d’extraction in-situ)

– Enfin, les grands groupes pétroliers et pétrochimiques plaident pour une phase transitoire autour de l’hydrogène « bleu ». Produit à partir du gaz naturel, il pourrait devenir propre sous réserve de captation complète des émissions de CO2 et de méthane associées.

POUR LES DÉCENNIES À VENIR, LES HYDROGÈNES « VERT » ET « BLEU » SERONT LES AXES MAJEURS DE DÉVELOPPEMENT DE LA FILIÈRE ÉNERGÉTIQUE.

Cette ambition se heurte à trois contraintes.

CONTRAINTE 1 : Demande versus Capacité

« RIEN N’EST PLUS IMMINENT QUE L’IMPOSSIBLE »
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Les attentes environnementales autour de la filière semblent aujourd’hui démesurées tant les besoins en capacité de production d’énergie sont gigantesques pour envisager de décarboner une part significative du marché. Pour rappel, la consommation énergétique globale sert principalement l’industrie (29%), les transports terrestre et aérien (29%) et la consommation résidentielle (21%).

AUJOURD’HUI, LA FILIÈRE HYDROGÈNE COUVRE MOINS DE 2% DE LA CONSOMMATION ÉNERGÉTIQUE MONDIALE.

Pour couvrir la consommation mondiale d’énergie en 2030, il faudrait couvrir la superficie de la France en panneaux photovoltaïques selon Land Art Generator (US). Sous réserve que ceux-ci bénéficient d’un rayonnement solaire optimal et constant et que leur rendement soit maximal. Les rendements observés du solaire étant aujourd’hui de 25%, il faudrait plutôt compter sur 4 fois la superficie de la France pour arriver à nos fins.

Ces chiffres nous laissent à comprendre pourquoi les grandes puissances pensent aujourd’hui à réinvestir massivement dans la filière nucléaire et sécurisent leurs accès aux gisements d’uranium dans le monde. Redéployer massivement la génération d’électricité nucléaire pourrait permettre de résoudre l’équation environnementale à 50 ans (réchauffement climatique – objectifs du GIEC). Avec néanmoins plusieurs sujets majeurs à régler, dont le traitement et stockage des déchets nucléaires et les questions de sécurité nucléaire. Mais l’horizon attendu de résolution de cette équation étant de l’ordre du millénaire, certains auront tôt fait de résoudre l’arbitrage.

CONTRAINTE 2 : Un cycle de développement incompressible des grands projets

« LA DIFFÉRENCE ENTRE LE POSSIBLE ET L’IMPOSSIBLE SE TROUVE DANS LA DÉTERMINATION »
Gandhi

Les procédés actuels d’électrolyse offrent un rendement énergétique faible et la filière d’hydrogène vert nécessitera la construction de gigafactories dont la technologie, le design et la montée en puissance ne sont pas encore maîtrisés.

Malgré toutes les tentatives d’accélération, il est question de grands projets et leur cycle de développement est normé. Il faut passer par un pilote / démonstrateur de 10 à 20 MW avant de se lancer dans la construction de sites de 100 MW, qui correspond actuellement à la capacité d’entrée cible pour jouer dans la cour des grands.

Ces grands projets suivent le cycle classique en ingénierie de grands projets présentés ci-dessous. Si nous prenons comme référence le procédé de liquéfaction du gaz naturel, qui se rapproche le plus en complexité d’ingénierie et de construction de celui de l’électrolyse à grande échelle, Il faudrait compter entre 5 et 7 ans pour aller de l’étude de faisabilité initiale à la mise en route du site pilote.

En admettant que le retour d’expérience du site pilote puisse être mené en parallèle des études de faisabilité et de conceptuel d’une gigafactory, il faudrait compter 5 à 7 ans supplémentaires pour parvenir à une gigafactory en état de fonctionnement.

Il est enfin raisonnable d’imaginer que l’usine de 100 MW sera composée d’unités indépendantes, ou « trains », dont les mises en service seront séquentielles sur une période additionnelle de 12 à 24 mois.

Selon ce schéma, il faudrait compter autour de 15 ans au total pour opérer une gigafactory en production effective de 100MW.

Cycle d’ingénierie de grands projets

POUR ACCÉLÉRER LE CYCLE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT DE CE TYPE DE PROJETS, IL EST ENVISAGEABLE DE JOUER SUR LES LEVIERS SUIVANTS :

• Sélectionner directement des prestataires qualifiés sans en minimisant les phases d’appel d’offres. De notre expérience de grands projets similaires, la solution de sélection par ‘’open book’’ est celle qui permet de réduire les temps d’appel d’offre tout en gardant un contrôle effectif sur les CAPEX. Ce levier permet de raccourcir les phases d’appels d’offres et 12 mois peuvent être gagnés.

• Paralléliser la construction du pilote d’une part et l’obtention des autorisations administratives et environnementales sur le site de la gigafactory d’autre part. Ce levier permettrait de réduire le cycle de quelques mois.

• Mettre en route de manière séquentielle la capacité de l’usine, segmentée en « trains » disjoints, et permettre ainsi de gagner de quelques mois à un an d’avance sur le démarrage de la production.

• Lancer l’ingénierie et la construction de la gigafactory en parallèle du démonstrateur et gérer le retour d’expérience du démonstrateur en termes d’optimisation de procédés en retrofit (approche disruptive rare mais efficace).

• Accélérer les cycles d’ingénierie et de construction en acceptant de financer un projet plus coûteux et en mobilisant plus de ressources à un instant t ;

DANS L’URGENCE, DES LEVIERS PLUS DISRUPTIFS SONT ENVISAGEABLES :

• Lever des contraintes administratives et environnementales et les délais associés ;

• Développer des outils (IT, IA) permettant d’accélérer significativement les étapes d’engineering ;

• Travailler à des unités plus capillaires mais industrialisables en série ; Dans tous ces cas, il faut accepter que le coût et le risque associés au levier d’accélération seront bien supérieurs à ceux d’un cycle de développement conventionnel.

CONTRAINTE 3 : Contrainte financière

« SI TU DOIS DEMANDER COMBIEN ÇA COÛTE, TU NE PEUX PAS TE LE PERMETTRE. »
John Pierpont Morgan

Développer la filière hydrogène « vert » requiert des investissements massifs et continus. Les grandes puissances l’ont enfin compris et acté : plus de 30 pays ont annoncé près de 300 milliards d’euros d’investissements pour développer la filière.

Mais ces investissements très significatifs semblent encore insuffisants face au mur carbone au pied duquel la planète se trouve. Selon les calculs de l’Energy Transition Commission (ETC) partagés en avril 2021, il faudrait investir 15 000 milliards de dollars entre 2021 et 2050 pour décarboner le marché mondial de l’énergie. Ce serait tout simplement 50 fois plus que ce qui est annoncé à date.

Comme l’exprime clairement Bill Gates via son initiative Catalyst de Breakthrough Energy, les mondes scientifiques, politiques et économiques ont déjà fait la démonstration de leur capacité à accompagner l’innovation énergétique et à lui donner un cadre de développement favorable. C’est ce qui a été réalisé ces dernières décennies avec l’énergie solaire, éolienne ou les batteries lithium-ion.

Mais en 2021, nous n’avons plus le luxe d’attendre des décennies. Nous devons collectivement faire un saut quantique pour accélérer l’innovation dans la décarbonation et sa mise en oeuvre.

Il s’agit d’investir (i) dans des proportions sans commune mesure avec ce qui a été réalisé dans le passé mais aussi (ii) de s’affranchir des modèles de TRI financiers historiques. En résumé :

• Sourcer une masse colossale de capitaux provenant des banques centrales, pays, institutions financières, grandes fortunes et philanthropes ;
• Flécher également une part significative de l’épargne plus capillaire (retraites, fonds de pension, fonds communs de placement);

• Accentuer les incentives aux technologies de décarbonation en mettant en place des schémas plus puissants que les taxes et crédits carbones dont l’effet est spot. En démoyennisant les taux d’intérêts en fonction de l’impact environnemental futur des projets par exemple ;

• Pour une part des capitaux investis, ne pas viser de rendement financier (TRI). L’espérance de gain devenant principalement environnementale.

Breakthrough Energy, qui est un fonds « non-profit », a levé plus d’un milliard d’euros pour son initiative Catalyst fin septembre 2021.

• Pour corollaire, mettre en oeuvre des reportings environnementaux aussi fiables que les reportings financiers.

Les investissements dans la décarbonation sont en train de révolutionner la finance par leur ampleur et par la nature du gain espéré.

Celui-ci sera environnemental et non financier.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #3 – Histoires de start-up

Amiral Technologies

Romain Proglio
Associé, Accuracy

Le 21 octobre dernier, Amiral Technologies a annoncé une levée de fonds de 2.8m€. Une première réussite pour cette start-up fondée en 2018 à Grenoble sur la base d’un constat partagé par de nombreux acteurs industriels : comment prédire de manière efficace les pannes ?

Spin-off du CNRS, Amiral Technologies s’appuie sur près de dix années de recherche universitaire en Intelligence Artificielle, Théorie de l’Automatisation et du Contrôle.

L’entreprise a développé avec succès une technologie de rupture : à partir de capteurs installés sur les machines, détectant des signaux physiques comme le courant électrique, les vibrations ou le taux d’humidité, des algorithmes permettent de générer des indicateurs de santé des équipements. Ces indicateurs de santé sont ensuite interprétés par des algorithmes de Machine Learning non-supervisés. Ils permettent d’identifier les défauts les plus susceptibles de survenir.

Cette solution (appelée DiagFit) faisant appel au Machine Learning ne nécessite pas, contrairement à la plupart des solutions du marché, un historique des défauts identifiés sur un appareil pour pouvoir recourir à l’intelligence artificielle.

L’algorithme est en effet adapté à un cas d’usage spécifique pour définir un environnement normalisé de fonctionnement d’un équipement.

Plus précise, plus rapide à déployer, indépendante des capteurs utilisés, elle a déjà séduit des PME, des ETI ainsi que de grands groupes industriels tels que Valéo, Airbus, Daher, Vinci ou encore Thales. Le marché de la maintenance prédictive bénéficie d’une dynamique de croissance soutenue, portée par un parc industriel de plus en plus équipé en capteurs, un besoin d’optimisation des stocks de pièces de rechange et bien entendu une nécessité accrue d’éviter tout arrêt couteux de la chaine de production.

Amiral Technologies a désormais pour ambition d’être rapidement le fournisseur leader sur le marché européen. La levée de fonds va ainsi permettre de renforcer son équipe technique et commerciale, d’accélérer le développement de DiagFit et les recherches scientifiques et technologiques.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #3 – Point de vue

Édito

Frédéric Recordon
Associé, Accuracy

GOUVERNER UN GRAND PAYS REVIENT À CUISINER UN PETIT POISSON1

De prime abord, tout semble aller pour le mieux en Chine. Le pays a surmonté la pandémie de COVID-19 ; l’économie a redémarré avec vigueur et la Chine semble entrer dans une nouvelle ère de prospérité dont les entreprises européennes présentes dans le pays devraient pouvoir tirer parti.

Force est cependant de noter à la lecture du 14ème Plan Quinquennal (2021-2025) quelques signes troublants d’un début de repli sur soi qui laissent planer des doutes considérables sur la trajectoire de croissance future du pays.

A l’issue de 40 années de modernisation, de réforme économique et d’ouverture sur le monde, l’économie chinoise a atteint un PIB par habitant aux alentours de 10k dollars américains, un niveau similaire à celui du Japon ou de la Corée après des périodes historiques équivalentes de 40 ans de décollage dans ces pays. Cependant au cours des 5 dernières années, la croissance de la Chine s’est considérablement essoufflée et cette tendance pourrait se poursuivre si le pays choisissait le repli insulaire à l’ouverture pratiquée depuis Deng Xiaoping.

La politique de Double Circulation, qui constitue le coeur du 14ème Plan, malgré les propos rassurants tenus par le président Xi lors de l’ouverture de la foire internationale de Shanghai le 4 novembre 2020, semble privilégier l’autonomie du marché domestique (circulation interne) à l’ouverture aux commerce et investissements internationaux (circulation externe).

La reprise en main récente de plusieurs secteurs clés du développement chinois, tels que les secteurs de l’internet, de l’énergie, de l’éducation, et le rôle croissant dévolu aux entreprises publiques – malgré leur faible efficacité et productivité – au détriment d’un secteur privé très dynamique témoignent d’une logique de contrôle strict de l’économie. Elles marquent aussi une inflexion majeure dans l’histoire économique récente du pays. Cette inflexion est clairement assumée par le Président Xi qui déclarait : « il faut correctement utiliser la main invisible et la main visible. (…) En Chine, la ferme direction du Parti constitue la garantie fondamentale »2.

La Chambre de Commerce Européenne en Chine dans son Position Paper 2021/2022 du 23 septembre 2021 manifestait sa préoccupation d’un repli insulaire et exhortait le gouvernement chinois à poursuivre son oeuvre de réforme et d’ouverture aux entreprises étrangères.

Les prochains mois préfigureront la trajectoire future de la Chine. Gageons que le pays sera gouverné comme on cuisine un petit poisson, dont le Président Xi expliquait que cela revenait à marcher avec précaution sur une fine couche de glace3.

____________

1 Président Xi Jinping citant le Livre de la Voie et de la Vertu (Dao De Jing, 道德经), La Gouvernance de la Chine, p.493

2 Président Xi Jinping, discours de la 15ème séance d’étude du Bureau politique du XVIIIème Comité Central du Parti, La Gouvernance de la Chine, p.137

3 Président Xi Jinping, interview accordée aux correspondants BRICS, le 19 mars 2013

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #3 (FR)

Pour notre troisième édition de Accuracy Talks Straight, Frédéric Recordon fait le point sur la crise sanitaire en Chine, avant de laisser Romain Proglio nous présenter Amiral Technologies, une start-up spécialisée sur la prédiction de panne. Nous analyserons ensuite le développement de la filière hydrogène avec Jean-François Partiot et Hervé de Trogoff.
Sophie Chassat, Philosophe et associée chez Wemean, nous proposera d’explorer la société chinoise “comme un seul homme”. Enfin, nous nous focaliserons sur l’analyse des chiffres avec Bruno Martinaud, Responsable Académique Entrepreneuriat à l’École Polytechnique, ainsi que sur le risque macroéconomique et microéconomique en Chine avec Hervé Goulletquer, Senior Economic Advisor.


SOMMAIRE


Édito

Frédéric Recordon
Associé, Accuracy

GOUVERNER UN GRAND PAYS REVIENT À CUISINER UN PETIT POISSON1

De prime abord, tout semble aller pour le mieux en Chine. Le pays a surmonté la pandémie de COVID-19 ; l’économie a redémarré avec vigueur et la Chine semble entrer dans une nouvelle ère de prospérité dont les entreprises européennes présentes dans le pays devraient pouvoir tirer parti.

Force est cependant de noter à la lecture du 14ème Plan Quinquennal (2021-2025) quelques signes troublants d’un début de repli sur soi qui laissent planer des doutes considérables sur la trajectoire de croissance future du pays.

A l’issue de 40 années de modernisation, de réforme économique et d’ouverture sur le monde, l’économie chinoise a atteint un PIB par habitant aux alentours de 10k dollars américains, un niveau similaire à celui du Japon ou de la Corée après des périodes historiques équivalentes de 40 ans de décollage dans ces pays. Cependant au cours des 5 dernières années, la croissance de la Chine s’est considérablement essoufflée et cette tendance pourrait se poursuivre si le pays choisissait le repli insulaire à l’ouverture pratiquée depuis Deng Xiaoping.

La politique de Double Circulation, qui constitue le coeur du 14ème Plan, malgré les propos rassurants tenus par le président Xi lors de l’ouverture de la foire internationale de Shanghai le 4 novembre 2020, semble privilégier l’autonomie du marché domestique (circulation interne) à l’ouverture aux commerce et investissements internationaux (circulation externe).

La reprise en main récente de plusieurs secteurs clés du développement chinois, tels que les secteurs de l’internet, de l’énergie, de l’éducation, et le rôle croissant dévolu aux entreprises publiques – malgré leur faible efficacité et productivité – au détriment d’un secteur privé très dynamique témoignent d’une logique de contrôle strict de l’économie. Elles marquent aussi une inflexion majeure dans l’histoire économique récente du pays. Cette inflexion est clairement assumée par le Président Xi qui déclarait : « il faut correctement utiliser la main invisible et la main visible. (…) En Chine, la ferme direction du Parti constitue la garantie fondamentale »2.

La Chambre de Commerce Européenne en Chine dans son Position Paper 2021/2022 du 23 septembre 2021 manifestait sa préoccupation d’un repli insulaire et exhortait le gouvernement chinois à poursuivre son oeuvre de réforme et d’ouverture aux entreprises étrangères.

Les prochains mois préfigureront la trajectoire future de la Chine. Gageons que le pays sera gouverné comme on cuisine un petit poisson, dont le Président Xi expliquait que cela revenait à marcher avec précaution sur une fine couche de glace3.

____________

1 Président Xi Jinping citant le Livre de la Voie et de la Vertu (Dao De Jing, 道德经), La Gouvernance de la Chine, p.493

2 Président Xi Jinping, discours de la 15ème séance d’étude du Bureau politique du XVIIIème Comité Central du Parti, La Gouvernance de la Chine, p.137

3 Président Xi Jinping, interview accordée aux correspondants BRICS, le 19 mars 2013

Amiral Technologies

Romain Proglio
Associé, Accuracy

Le 21 octobre dernier, Amiral Technologies a annoncé une levée de fonds de 2.8m€. Une première réussite pour cette start-up fondée en 2018 à Grenoble sur la base d’un constat partagé par de nombreux acteurs industriels : comment prédire de manière efficace les pannes ?

Spin-off du CNRS, Amiral Technologies s’appuie sur près de dix années de recherche universitaire en Intelligence Artificielle, Théorie de l’Automatisation et du Contrôle.

L’entreprise a développé avec succès une technologie de rupture : à partir de capteurs installés sur les machines, détectant des signaux physiques comme le courant électrique, les vibrations ou le taux d’humidité, des algorithmes permettent de générer des indicateurs de santé des équipements. Ces indicateurs de santé sont ensuite interprétés par des algorithmes de Machine Learning non-supervisés. Ils permettent d’identifier les défauts les plus susceptibles de survenir.

Cette solution (appelée DiagFit) faisant appel au Machine Learning ne nécessite pas, contrairement à la plupart des solutions du marché, un historique des défauts identifiés sur un appareil pour pouvoir recourir à l’intelligence artificielle.

L’algorithme est en effet adapté à un cas d’usage spécifique pour définir un environnement normalisé de fonctionnement d’un équipement.

Plus précise, plus rapide à déployer, indépendante des capteurs utilisés, elle a déjà séduit des PME, des ETI ainsi que de grands groupes industriels tels que Valéo, Airbus, Daher, Vinci ou encore Thales. Le marché de la maintenance prédictive bénéficie d’une dynamique de croissance soutenue, portée par un parc industriel de plus en plus équipé en capteurs, un besoin d’optimisation des stocks de pièces de rechange et bien entendu une nécessité accrue d’éviter tout arrêt couteux de la chaine de production.

Amiral Technologies a désormais pour ambition d’être rapidement le fournisseur leader sur le marché européen. La levée de fonds va ainsi permettre de renforcer son équipe technique et commerciale, d’accélérer le développement de DiagFit et les recherches scientifiques et technologiques.


Accélerer la filière hydrogène

Jean-François Partiot
Associé,
Accuracy

Hervé de Trogoff
Associé,
Accuracy

Depuis quelques années, l’hydrogène est présenté comme la solution miracle pour développer les transports propres et permettre le stockage d’énergie à grande échelle.

La combustion finale de l’hydrogène, dégageant exclusivement énergie, eau et oxygène, est en effet 100% propre et laisse entrevoir un potentiel prometteur.

Le bilan carbone de sa production est en revanche extrêmement variable selon son origine. La filière hydrogène n’est pas nécessairement propre et seul l’hydrogène décarboné attise les convoitises.

– Historiquement, l’hydrogène industriel – ou « gris » – est produit à partir d’énergies fossiles carbonées et son bilan environnemental est insatisfaisant, voire mauvais, tant que le CO2 issu de sa production n’est pas capturé. L’hydrogène « gris » est un sous-produit « fatal » du raffinage pétrolier (désulfuration du pétrole) et de la production d’ammoniac. Plus de 90% de l’hydrogène produit dans le monde est « gris » et cette part est vouée à baisser drastiquement au profit des hydrogènes « vert » et « bleu ».

Toutes les attentions se concentrent aujourd’hui sur la production d’hydrogène « vert », i.e. produit à partir d’électricité décarbonée (solaire, éolien, nucléaire, hydraulique) ;

– Certains chercheurs veulent aussi croire en l’exploitation de l’hydrogène « blanc », c’est-à-dire d’origine naturelle. Aussi étonnant que cela puisse paraître, les connaissances sur l’existence et les possibilités d’extraction de cet hydrogène natif sont encore embryonnaires. L’hydrogène « blanc » reste pour l’instant le rêve de quelques pionniers. Les connaissances à son sujet sont embryonnaires, les volumes accessibles méconnus. Le cycle de recherche et d’éventuel développement sera long. Si jamais cette voie s’avérait économiquement viable, elle serait très probablement explorée par les grands énergéticiens pétroliers (métier d’extraction in-situ)

– Enfin, les grands groupes pétroliers et pétrochimiques plaident pour une phase transitoire autour de l’hydrogène « bleu ». Produit à partir du gaz naturel, il pourrait devenir propre sous réserve de captation complète des émissions de CO2 et de méthane associées.

POUR LES DÉCENNIES À VENIR, LES HYDROGÈNES « VERT » ET « BLEU » SERONT LES AXES MAJEURS DE DÉVELOPPEMENT DE LA FILIÈRE ÉNERGÉTIQUE.

Cette ambition se heurte à trois contraintes.

CONTRAINTE 1 : Demande versus Capacité

« RIEN N’EST PLUS IMMINENT QUE L’IMPOSSIBLE »
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Les attentes environnementales autour de la filière semblent aujourd’hui démesurées tant les besoins en capacité de production d’énergie sont gigantesques pour envisager de décarboner une part significative du marché. Pour rappel, la consommation énergétique globale sert principalement l’industrie (29%), les transports terrestre et aérien (29%) et la consommation résidentielle (21%).

AUJOURD’HUI, LA FILIÈRE HYDROGÈNE COUVRE MOINS DE 2% DE LA CONSOMMATION ÉNERGÉTIQUE MONDIALE.

Pour couvrir la consommation mondiale d’énergie en 2030, il faudrait couvrir la superficie de la France en panneaux photovoltaïques selon Land Art Generator (US). Sous réserve que ceux-ci bénéficient d’un rayonnement solaire optimal et constant et que leur rendement soit maximal. Les rendements observés du solaire étant aujourd’hui de 25%, il faudrait plutôt compter sur 4 fois la superficie de la France pour arriver à nos fins.

Ces chiffres nous laissent à comprendre pourquoi les grandes puissances pensent aujourd’hui à réinvestir massivement dans la filière nucléaire et sécurisent leurs accès aux gisements d’uranium dans le monde. Redéployer massivement la génération d’électricité nucléaire pourrait permettre de résoudre l’équation environnementale à 50 ans (réchauffement climatique – objectifs du GIEC). Avec néanmoins plusieurs sujets majeurs à régler, dont le traitement et stockage des déchets nucléaires et les questions de sécurité nucléaire. Mais l’horizon attendu de résolution de cette équation étant de l’ordre du millénaire, certains auront tôt fait de résoudre l’arbitrage.

CONTRAINTE 2 : Un cycle de développement incompressible des grands projets

« LA DIFFÉRENCE ENTRE LE POSSIBLE ET L’IMPOSSIBLE SE TROUVE DANS LA DÉTERMINATION »
Gandhi

Les procédés actuels d’électrolyse offrent un rendement énergétique faible et la filière d’hydrogène vert nécessitera la construction de gigafactories dont la technologie, le design et la montée en puissance ne sont pas encore maîtrisés.

Malgré toutes les tentatives d’accélération, il est question de grands projets et leur cycle de développement est normé. Il faut passer par un pilote / démonstrateur de 10 à 20 MW avant de se lancer dans la construction de sites de 100 MW, qui correspond actuellement à la capacité d’entrée cible pour jouer dans la cour des grands.

Ces grands projets suivent le cycle classique en ingénierie de grands projets présentés ci-dessous. Si nous prenons comme référence le procédé de liquéfaction du gaz naturel, qui se rapproche le plus en complexité d’ingénierie et de construction de celui de l’électrolyse à grande échelle, Il faudrait compter entre 5 et 7 ans pour aller de l’étude de faisabilité initiale à la mise en route du site pilote.

En admettant que le retour d’expérience du site pilote puisse être mené en parallèle des études de faisabilité et de conceptuel d’une gigafactory, il faudrait compter 5 à 7 ans supplémentaires pour parvenir à une gigafactory en état de fonctionnement.

Il est enfin raisonnable d’imaginer que l’usine de 100 MW sera composée d’unités indépendantes, ou « trains », dont les mises en service seront séquentielles sur une période additionnelle de 12 à 24 mois.

Selon ce schéma, il faudrait compter autour de 15 ans au total pour opérer une gigafactory en production effective de 100MW.

Cycle d’ingénierie de grands projets

POUR ACCÉLÉRER LE CYCLE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT DE CE TYPE DE PROJETS, IL EST ENVISAGEABLE DE JOUER SUR LES LEVIERS SUIVANTS :

• Sélectionner directement des prestataires qualifiés sans en minimisant les phases d’appel d’offres. De notre expérience de grands projets similaires, la solution de sélection par ‘’open book’’ est celle qui permet de réduire les temps d’appel d’offre tout en gardant un contrôle effectif sur les CAPEX. Ce levier permet de raccourcir les phases d’appels d’offres et 12 mois peuvent être gagnés.

• Paralléliser la construction du pilote d’une part et l’obtention des autorisations administratives et environnementales sur le site de la gigafactory d’autre part. Ce levier permettrait de réduire le cycle de quelques mois.

• Mettre en route de manière séquentielle la capacité de l’usine, segmentée en « trains » disjoints, et permettre ainsi de gagner de quelques mois à un an d’avance sur le démarrage de la production.

• Lancer l’ingénierie et la construction de la gigafactory en parallèle du démonstrateur et gérer le retour d’expérience du démonstrateur en termes d’optimisation de procédés en retrofit (approche disruptive rare mais efficace).

• Accélérer les cycles d’ingénierie et de construction en acceptant de financer un projet plus coûteux et en mobilisant plus de ressources à un instant t ;

DANS L’URGENCE, DES LEVIERS PLUS DISRUPTIFS SONT ENVISAGEABLES :

• Lever des contraintes administratives et environnementales et les délais associés ;

• Développer des outils (IT, IA) permettant d’accélérer significativement les étapes d’engineering ;

• Travailler à des unités plus capillaires mais industrialisables en série ; Dans tous ces cas, il faut accepter que le coût et le risque associés au levier d’accélération seront bien supérieurs à ceux d’un cycle de développement conventionnel.

CONTRAINTE 3 : Contrainte financière

« SI TU DOIS DEMANDER COMBIEN ÇA COÛTE, TU NE PEUX PAS TE LE PERMETTRE. »
John Pierpont Morgan

Développer la filière hydrogène « vert » requiert des investissements massifs et continus. Les grandes puissances l’ont enfin compris et acté : plus de 30 pays ont annoncé près de 300 milliards d’euros d’investissements pour développer la filière.

Mais ces investissements très significatifs semblent encore insuffisants face au mur carbone au pied duquel la planète se trouve. Selon les calculs de l’Energy Transition Commission (ETC) partagés en avril 2021, il faudrait investir 15 000 milliards de dollars entre 2021 et 2050 pour décarboner le marché mondial de l’énergie. Ce serait tout simplement 50 fois plus que ce qui est annoncé à date.

Comme l’exprime clairement Bill Gates via son initiative Catalyst de Breakthrough Energy, les mondes scientifiques, politiques et économiques ont déjà fait la démonstration de leur capacité à accompagner l’innovation énergétique et à lui donner un cadre de développement favorable. C’est ce qui a été réalisé ces dernières décennies avec l’énergie solaire, éolienne ou les batteries lithium-ion.

Mais en 2021, nous n’avons plus le luxe d’attendre des décennies. Nous devons collectivement faire un saut quantique pour accélérer l’innovation dans la décarbonation et sa mise en oeuvre.

Il s’agit d’investir (i) dans des proportions sans commune mesure avec ce qui a été réalisé dans le passé mais aussi (ii) de s’affranchir des modèles de TRI financiers historiques. En résumé :

• Sourcer une masse colossale de capitaux provenant des banques centrales, pays, institutions financières, grandes fortunes et philanthropes ;
• Flécher également une part significative de l’épargne plus capillaire (retraites, fonds de pension, fonds communs de placement);

• Accentuer les incentives aux technologies de décarbonation en mettant en place des schémas plus puissants que les taxes et crédits carbones dont l’effet est spot. En démoyennisant les taux d’intérêts en fonction de l’impact environnemental futur des projets par exemple ;

• Pour une part des capitaux investis, ne pas viser de rendement financier (TRI). L’espérance de gain devenant principalement environnementale.

Breakthrough Energy, qui est un fonds « non-profit », a levé plus d’un milliard d’euros pour son initiative Catalyst fin septembre 2021.

• Pour corollaire, mettre en oeuvre des reportings environnementaux aussi fiables que les reportings financiers.

Les investissements dans la décarbonation sont en train de révolutionner la finance par leur ampleur et par la nature du gain espéré.

Celui-ci sera environnemental et non financier.


Comme un seul homme

Sophie Chassat
Philosophe, Associée chez Wemean

Culturellement, la Chine fonctionne comme notre double inversé : moeurs, modèles mentaux et rituels nous y interpellent systématiquement. Pour notre plus grand bien, insiste le philosophe François Jullien qui voit dans la pensée chinoise un précieux décentrement pour se départir des certitudes de la culture occidentale – notamment binarisme, frontalité et constants passages en force au nom de la logique1. Cela ne signifie en rien qu’il faille donner raison à cette perspective autre, mais l’expérience de la différence absolue à laquelle elle nous convie nous permet souvent d’ouvrir de nouvelles voies pour nous-mêmes.

Parmi les éléments les plus fascinants, il y a cette façon dont la société chinoise semble toujours réagir « comme un seul homme » : l’expression du collectif y est unanime. Certes, la nature du régime politique et son durcissement actuel visà- vis de l’expression de toute singularité amenant à sortir du lot, y sont pour beaucoup. Mais il reste que la Chine nous oppose depuis toujours le contrepoint absolu à l’individualisme mais aussi au communautarisme qui, en Occident, ont conduit à faire disparaître le sens de l’intérêt général.

Pour se représenter ce mouvement collectif en bloc, on pense bien sûr au Léviathan de Hobbes, dont l’image célèbre du frontispice de l’ouvrage représente le corps du roi composé de la foule des individus du royaume … lesquels, si on y regarde de plus près, n’ont pas de visages, tournés tout entiers qu’ils sont vers la face du souverain. Détail qui rappelle le danger des métaphores organiques quand on les utilise pour parler des sociétés : elles ont beau prétendre signifier que, si les parties sont là pour le tout, le tout est là aussi pour les parties, il reste que bien souvent les parties n’ont qu’à s’écraser devant le tout…

Ruche, fourmilière ou encore « murmuration » (ce phénomène naturel des nuées d’oiseaux ou des bancs de poissons qui se déplacent de concert, chaque animal semblant suivre une chorégraphie tracée d’avance sans pourtant qu’aucun individu leader ne la dirige) nous donnent aussi de prime abord des images assez ajustées des mouvements collectifs dont sont capables les Chinois. Mais il faut bien vite se départir de ces analogies animales : l’ethnologue Claude Lévi-Strauss rappelait à juste titre qu’elles sont le début de la barbarie puisqu’elles reviennent à dénier la qualité humaine à l’autre culture2.

Si aucune de ces métaphores ne dessine un modèle souhaitable, il reste que cette façon de fonctionner « comme un seul homme » nous tend en négatif un miroir : comment sortir de l’impasse de la « société des individus » (Norbert Elias) qui caractérise un modèle de société occidentale d’où tout intérêt supérieur semble avoir disparu ? Comment retrouver quelque chose comme un élan collectif ? Et s’il s’agissait d’abord que nos élans individuels nous le fassent désirer3 ? Sortir de l’individualisme ne signifie pas annihiler les individus, mais les inviter à cesser de ne se tourner que vers soi pour s’élancer vers des réalisations communes. Entre l’Occident et la Chine, entre atomisme et holisme, une troisième voie est possible.

____________

1 François Jullien, Traité de l’efficacité (1996).

2 Claude Lévi-Strauss, Race et Histoire (1952).

3 Sophie Chassat vient de publier Élan Vital. Antidote philosophique au vague à l’âme contemporain, éditions Calmann-Lévy (octobre 2021)


Les chiffres mentent

Bruno Martinaud
Responsable Académique Entrepreneuriat, Ecole Polytechnique

En 2009, Kevin Systrom (bientôt rejoint par son co-fondateur, Mike Krieger) travaille sur un projet de réseau social géolocalisé, proche de Foursquare. Ils réussissent à convaincre Baseline Ventures et Andressen Horowitz d’investir 500 000$ dans le projet. Ceci leur permet de s’investir à temps plein dans l’aventure. Un an plus tard Burbn est lancé sous la forme d’une application iPhone qui permettait d’enregistrer des lieux, de planifier des sorties, de poster des photos, etc. L’application est massivement téléchargée, mais le verdict est sans appel : les utilisateurs, beta-testeurs, n’aiment pas du tout. Trop encombrée, trop fouillie, ils s’y perdent et ont arrêté pour la plupart de l’utiliser. Echec patent. Rien que de très normal, l’entrepreneur, digère, en tire les enseignements et rebondit vers une nouvelle aventure. Les métriques sont mauvaises, dont acte. Et pourtant Kevin Systrom ne s’arrêta pas là, car il remarqua un fait d’apparence anodine, l’usage dans la fonction de partage de photos (une parmi tant d’autres) semblait être le fait d’un petit nombre d’utilisateurs réguliers… Il creusa, interrogea ces utilisateurs et se rendit compte que ce petit groupe adorait cette fonction (et seulement celle-ci). Instagram était né, de cette heureuse constatation qu’un petit nombre de personnes, cachées dans une majorité qui n’aimait pas Burbn, utilisaient l’app pour une seule raison.

Cette histoire met en évidence un principe contrenaturel pour le manager éduquée : les chiffres mentent au début. Les métriques de Burbn étaient catastrophiques… L’approche rationnelle est d’acter le fait et de passer à la suite… Mais s’y cachait un signal faible porteur de potentiel.

L’histoire du Viagra relève de la même séquence. Les laboratoires Pfizer développaient un régulateur de tension artérielle, lequel se trouvait en phase III dans le processus test préalable à l’autorisation de mise sur le marché.

Si l’on se rappelle que le développement d’une nouvelle molécule représente un investissement d’environ 1Mde, cela signifie qu’environ 700 à 800M$ ont déjà été engagés dans le projet. La pression est donc forte pour aboutir dès que possible à cette autorisation. Il se trouve que quelqu’un au sein des équipes de Pfizer remarqua que certaines personnes dans l’échantillon de test ne restituaient pas les pilules qu’ils n’auraient pas dû utiliser dans le cadre du protocole qui leur avait été assigné. Qui fait attention à cela. Quelques données incohérentes, sans lien direct avec le sujet : l’efficacité de la molécule. Quelques cellules atypiques dans un tableau de 300 colonnes par 100 000 lignes… Et pourtant, en creusant, cette personne a réalisé que ceux qui ne restituaient pas les pilules partageaient toutes les mêmes caractéristiques d’âge et de sexe…

Et Pfizer a ainsi réalisé que ce régulateur de la tension artérielle avait un effet secondaire insoupçonné, tellement intéressant que le projet a été réorienté dans cette direction.

Derrière ces exemples que l’on pourrait juxtaposer à l’infini, se trouve une observation simple : un projet innovant, une start-up qui démarrent sont des aventures exploratoires…Explorer c’est d’abord se rappeler que je ne sais pas ce qui marche et ne marche pas dans mon idée. C’est reconnaître que je suis confronté à des problématiques complexes dont je ne cerne pas les variables descriptives, ne comprends pas leurs interactions, ni effets.

De là, cette conséquence, objet du présent propos, je ne sais pas quoi mesurer, et je ne sais pas le sens de ce que je mesure. Et cela dans les deux sens, de mauvaises métriques a priori, tel que l’illustre Burbn, peuvent cacher une pépite. Mais l’inverse est également vrai. Nous avons récemment côtoyé une start-up qui développe un objet connecté pour le bien être à destination du grand public. Elle en a rapidement écoulé quelques dizaines de milliers, et forte de ce succès, a levé des fonds pour « scaler » rapidement et contrôler le marché… si ce n’est que les ventes, bien loin de croître, se sont stabilisées puis ont décliné. En fait ces 30 000 n’étaient pas le signe précurseur d’une adoption massive et rapide, mais l’essentiel du marché adressable. Après une période d’errement, d’interrogation, de doute et de recherche, elle a finalement trouvé un marché B2B, centré sur une offre de service, lequel s’appuie sur l’objet connecté.

Toute l’ironie de l’affaire est que de bons chiffres précoces ne signifie pas que l’on a trouvé son marché.

CES OBSERVATIONS DÉBOUCHENT SUR DEUX RECOMMANDATIONS PRATIQUES SIMPLES, PRESQUE TRIVIALE DANS LEUR EXPRESSION, MAIS GLISSANTE DANS LEUR APPLICATION :

1. Se rappeler que la seule méthode pour avancer dans un environnement complexe est l’expérimentation. Essai – Erreur. Retenir ce qui marche. Eliminer ce qui ne marche pas. La compréhension viendra plus tard. Cette approche empirique est appliquée depuis toujours à l’extrême par Pixar. A partir d’un concept de départ, Pixar teste tout. Il y a eu, tout au fil du processus de production, 43 536 variantes de Nemo, 69 562 de Ratatouille, et 98 173 de Wall-E… Voilà le chemin entre l’idée initiale et le succès final.

2. Se donner les moyens de « capter » les signaux faibles, c’est dire mettre en place des stratégies pour enregistrerce qui est non pertinent à l’instant présent mais qui pourra trouver un sens plus plus tard. Se rappeler qu’à l’instant présent, dans la première vie d’un projet innovant, nul n’est capable de distinguer le pertinent du non pertinent.

Malheureusement l’esprit humain est ainsi câblé qu’il lui est nécessaire d’essayer de donner un sens précoces aux informations qui lui parviennent, ce qui conduit ensuite à moins ressentir le besoin de tout tester (puisque l’on a compris) et à filtrer le bruit (puisque l’on a identifié le signal)… Là se situent probablement les deux péchés capitaux de l’innovateur ou de l’entrepreneur en phase de démarrage.


La Chine, ou quand un risque peut en cacher un autre !

Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Advisor, Accuracy

Si on s’intéresse en ce début d’automne à l’économie chinoise, deux dynamiques se dégagent. D’abord et du côté de la macroéconomie, une vraie déception côté croissance du PIB a été enregistré au cours du troisième trimestre. Celle-ci n’a été que de 0,2% T sur T. Pour mémoire, le consensus des économistes réalisé par l’agence Bloomberg, l’un des agrégateurs de prévisions les plus regardés, tablait à la mi-septembre sur une progression de plus de 1%. Le phénomène ne serait cependant pas durable et dès le quatrième trimestre le pays retrouverait une performance tendancielle (autour de 1,5%, T sur T). Même en acceptant l’augure, n’y a-t-il pas un risque d’être une nouvelle fois surpris négativement à brève échéance ?

Chine : le passage à vide ne durerait pas

Ensuite, en focalisant cette fois-ci sur la microéconomie, il y a le dossier Evergrande. Il s’agit du plus grand promoteur immobilier, qui le temps passant s’est transformé en une sorte de conglomérat. Il n’arrive pas à honorer des dettes ou des coupons arrivant à échéance. Il faut dire que le montant des premières est élevé : plus de 300 milliards de dollars au total ou près de 2% du PIB du pays (dont 90 milliards de dette financière – crédit bancaire et obligation –, 150 milliards de dette commerciale, y compris les dépôts des acquéreurs de logements à construire et 80 milliards de hors bilan – avant tout les produits de placements émis par la société –). Le cash disponible ne couvrirait que 40% de la dette à court terme (maturité inférieure à 12 mois). Avant le démarrage du processus de séparation d’une partie des actifs, on estimait qu’une « vente à la casse » impliquerait une dévalorisation de la dette (haircut) de quelque 50%.

Il faut remarquer que le cas d’Evergrande, aussi emblématique et médiatisé que la société soit, n’est pas unique. D’autres promoteurs se mettent en situation de défaut ; même quand ils sont en mesure de payer ce qu’ils doivent. Ils arguent d’un durcissement de la réglementation, qui entrave fortement le bon développement de leurs affaires et… tentent de passer le mistigri à leurs créanciers. Ou, pour mieux dire, de créer suffisamment de scandale et d’embarras pour forcer les pouvoirs publics à revoir leur attitude.

Evergrande : des prix d’actif franchement à la baisse

Un évènement de crédit majeur dans un environnement économique brusquement dégradé et voilà le regard qui devient plus inquiet : et si la Chine n’était plus un pôle de stabilité dans un monde qui en a bien besoin ?

En fait, l’Administration Xi (du nom du Président Xi Jinping) a bien ouvert une phase de restructuration/consolidation de l’économie du pays ; avec comme ambition de renforcer ses fondamentaux. Sans doute pensait-elle que l’environnement international était propice à cela. Le reflux de l’épidémie de COVID, le retour de la croissance mondiale et un Président des Etats-Unis a priori plus coopératif devaient créer les conditions d’une demande extérieure suffisamment porteuse pour compenser les « couacs » au niveau des dépenses domestiques que les réformes, même bien inspirées et bien menées, ne manqueraient pas d’occasionner.

Disons que, comme c’est souvent le cas dans la vie, le déroulé des choses n’est pas exactement comme prévu !

LE GOUVERNEMENT DE PÉKIN A OUVERT TROIS CHANTIERS : L’IMMOBILIER, L’ENDETTEMENT ET LES INÉGALITÉS. TOUS DOIVENT ÊTRE RÉDUITS.

Commençons par l’immobilier. Son poids total dans l’économie, en prenant en compte les effets induits amont et aval, est estimé entre 25% et 30%. L’ordre de grandeur évoque ce qu’on a pu connaître en Espagne ou en Irlande avant la grande récession de 2008. N’y a-t-il pas dans ce rappel une invitation à prévenir plutôt qu’à guérir une fois la bulle immobilière éclatée ? De plus et surtout, les besoins sont devenus moins prégnants (sauf importante vague de migration des campagnes vers le villes), alors même que les prix sont devenus vraiment élevés. Une moyenne de 42 m2 par habitant d’un logement se compare tout à fait à ce qu’on peut connaître dans les grands pays d’Europe de l’ouest. Le ratio prix de l’immobilier sur revenu moyen des ménages dépasse les 40 à Pékin ou Shanghai (chiffres de 2018). S’il se compare à Hong Kong, il est très inflaté par rapport à Londres ou Paris (autour de 20), sans même parler de New York (12). Le niveau observé dans les grandes villes chinoises ne peut se comprendre que si la croissance économique et la démographie restent suffisamment fortes pour justifier une demande de biens immobiliers toujours très dynamique et donc maintenir des anticipations de hausse de prix de l’immobilier. On sait que la démographie n’ira pas dans ce sens et on sent que le potentiel de hausse du PIB va ralentissant.

Empêcher la formation d’une bulle immobilière peut être aussi perçue comme une ardente obligation. D’abord, préserver la capacité d’initiatives du système financier n’est-il pas une nécessité à un moment de changements structurels de l’économie engagés ? L’exposition de celui-ci sur le secteur immobilier est importante, entre 50% et 60% du total du crédit bancaire distribué. Ensuite, moins d’investissement immobilier permettrait, au moins toutes choses égales par ailleurs, d’augmenter l’effort porté sur celui en biens d’équipement ou en produits de la propriété intellectuelle. Le profil tant de la productivité que de la croissance économique pourrait s’en trouver améliorer.

Exposition de crédit au secteur immobilier

Passons à l’endettement. Celui des entreprises non-financières est élevé ; en fait parmi les plus élevés des pays qui comptent autour du globe. Ils représentent 160% du PIB du pays. On peut évidemment mettre en avant les niveaux beaucoup plus raisonnables enregistrés pour les ménages et les administrations publiques et ainsi insister sur une moyenne très « présentable ». Il n’empêche que se lancer dans des réformes économiques, qui ne manqueront pas de faire des perdants à côté des vainqueurs espérés, en partant d’une situation de dette importante dans le secteur des corporates, est inconfortable. Et encore plus si on prend aussi en compte l’effet de ricochet sur le système financier des difficultés rencontrées par un certain nombre d’entreprises.

On doit alors comprendre que l’importance donnée à une plus grande stabilité du système financier risque de peser sur la croissance économique. Raison de plus, comme on le soulignait précédemment, pour s’assurer d’un fléchage plus efficace de l’investissement : vers là où le potentiel de croissance durable et inclusive est le plus important.

Le fil qui passe de l’immobilier à l’endettement conduit aux inégalités. Elles sont trop élevées et Pékin ambitionne de les réduire. Ce qu’on vient de décrire concernant l’« aventure » de l’immobilier chinois, auquel il faut ajouter le développement de la Tech, avec son corolaire de surperformances boursières, a contribué à une augmentation qui les positionne aujourd’hui au niveau des Etats-Unis. Le 1% le plus riche détient 30% du patrimoine de l’ensemble des ménages. La part a doublé en 20 ans (de 1995 à 2015). Cette évolution apparaît, aux yeux de Pékin, come porteuse d’un risque de remise en cause de la stabilité politique. La classe moyenne n’appelle-t-elle pas de ses voeux, pour ce qu’on en comprend, une réduction de ces inégalités ?

Aussi dit, aussitôt fait ; pourrait-on avoir envie de dire. Le Président Xi n’est pas une personne à trainer. Un grand nombre de mesures ont été prises afin de rendre effective cette triple ambition. Elles concernent pour beaucoup les secteurs de la Tech et de l’immobilier et incitent à un comportement davantage moral de la part des citoyens. Le tableau ci-dessous propose une synthèse des changements engagés.

Tout ceci a un pouvoir de déstabilisation ! S’assurer du bon parallélisme, entre l’impact des décisions qui vont peser sur la croissance (immobilier, financement et Tech) et celles à venir qui doivent la doper (volonté d’augmenter le contenu en valeur ajoutée de l’économie chinoise, moindre dépendance de l’étranger et dynamisation « saine » de la demande intérieure, pour pointer ce qu’on comprend), va demander beaucoup de doigté de politique économique. Même dans un système encore assez étatisé, cela tient de la gageure. Bénéficier d’une environnement extérieur porteur est sans doute aujourd’hui une « ardente obligation » pour Pékin. Et tant pis si c’est contradictoire, au moins dans un premier temps, avec l’ambition de s’autonomiser davantage par rapport au reste du monde. En est-on là ?

Chine : vers une nouvelle décomposition de l’investissement fixe

Chine : des inégalités devenues une question politique

Une dette des entreprises chinoises non-financières parmi les plus élevés

Pas vraiment, avec un environnement international compliqué (de l’épidémie de COVID qui n’a pas disparu à la persistance des tensions sino-américaines en passant par une économie mondiale encore convalescente)… Il va falloir arbitrer entre le souhaitable (les réformes intérieures) et le possible (les degrés de liberté offerts par la conjoncture économique et politique extérieure). Ce qui voudra dire accélérer quand c’est possible et ralentir quand c’est nécessaire. La tâche est ardue pour le responsable de politique économique et son suivi par la communauté des affaires, pas toujours simple !


Lire la deuxième édition de Accuracy Talks Straight >

Accuracy conseille MBO&CO et Fincap Invest

Accuracy a réalisé les travaux de vendor due diligence pour MBO&Co, Fincap Invest et d’autres investisseurs dans le cadre de la vente de IMMR à Veranex (soutenu par Summit Partners).

Accuracy advises MBO&Co and Fincap Invest

Accuracy conducted financial vendor due diligence for MBO&Co, FINCAP Invest and other investors in the context of the sale of IMMR to Veranex (backed by Summit Partners).

Accuracy conseille 21 Invest

Accuracy a réalisé les travaux de buy side due diligence pour 21 Invest, dans le cadre de l’acquisition du groupe Edukea, plateforme européenne spécialisée dans la formation aux métiers de la santé naturelle et du bien-être.

Accuracy advises 21 Invest

Accuracy conducted financial buy-side due diligence for 21 Invest in the context of the acquisition of Edukea Group, an European platform specialized in the training of natural health and well-being professions.

Economic brief: what the figures tell us (#7)

During the summer, economic figures were updated to reflect the latest activity. Of particular note were the figures for July and August, which appear to show the incipient normalisation of the global economy, a trend that is set to continue. In this edition of the Economic Brief, we will look into the reasons behind this normalisation effect. We will also touch on a new development being seen in the labour market.

Accuracy conseille InfraVia Capital Partners

Accuracy a réalisé les travaux de Buy-side DD stratégique pour InfraVia Capital Partners dans le cadre de la prise de participation majoritaire dans le groupe de crèches Grandir.

Global advisory firm Accuracy promotes two to partner in Singapore office

Accuracy, the global independent advisory firm, has promoted two of its directors to partners in its Singapore office. This brings Accuracy’s total number of partners to 56, across 13 countries.

Samuel Widdowson specialises in forensic construction planning and programming in a variety of contexts, whilst Zaheer Minhas specialises in major projects infrastructure advisory across multiple sectors. Their promotions reflect Accuracy’s continued expansion in the Southeast Asia market.

Accuracy advises Sodexo

Accuracy conducted the financial vendor due diligence for Sodexo in the disposal of Liveli to Grandir.

Accuracy conseille Sodexo

Accuracy a réalisé les travaux de vendor due diligence financière et stratégique pour SODEXO dans le cadre de la cession de Liveli à Grandir.

Accuracy Talks Straight #2 – Economic point of view

Inflationary risk: where should we be looking?

Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Advisor, Accuracy

Let’s remember the time before the pandemic. Prices are reasonable. From the beginning of 2010 to the beginning of 2020, the average annual increase in consumer price indices, when we exclude particularly volatile items like energy and food products, reaches 1.8% in the United States and 1.1% in the eurozone. The 2% objective set by central banks is not met and even the very low rate of unemployment (at the beginning of last year, it was 3.5% in the US and 5% in Germany) seems unable to generate an acceleration, via more dynamic labour costs.

Labour market developments – deregulation and a decrease in the bargaining power of employees – may explain the majority of this result. A collective preference for saving over investment and the credibility of monetary policies are other explanations that can be put forward.

But it’s only after a COVID-19 crisis that has lasted almost a year and a half and a way out that is finally taking shape, at least in the US and Europe, that the price landscape seems to have been thrown upside down! In two months (April and May), this very same core of prices increases by 1.6% in the United States (a 10% annual rate!) and 0.7% in the eurozone (an annual rate of over 4%). Just what is going on? This price acceleration comes as somewhat of a (bad) surprise, particularly because the objective of economic policy, throughout the pandemic, has been to maintain productive capacities (companies and employees), so that activity can restart ‘like before’ when the public health conditions allow it.

So, in terms of prices, things may not be happening exactly as expected. What explanations can we give? Let’s start with three.

First, the reopening of an economy more or less “preserved” over a fairly long period requires rebalancing. Starting production again is not instantaneous, and demand during lockdown is not the same as demand during unlockdown. For supply, a raw materials index, like the S&P GSCI, increases by 65% over one year (and even 130% compared with the low point in April 2020). Similarly, the cost of sea freight increases over one year by more than 150%. As for demand, during this interim period between one economic state and another, two mechanisms of upward price distortion coexist. The goods or services that turned out to be the winners of the lockdown have still not relinquished their crowns; their prices remain dynamic. Those that were the losers can now “pick themselves back up”, or rather pick their prices back up! The two graphs below illustrate what is happening in the US.

Based on this two fold observation and at this stage of analysis, an initial conclusion emerges: the price acceleration phenomenon may very well prove temporary, as the central bankers keep telling us. The production circuit will get back up to “cruising speed”, and the concomitance of these two movements in the rise of certain retail prices is not expected to last.

US: price winners from unlockdown (4% of index)

US: price winners from lockdown (12% of index)

We must remember the mechanisms that are at the heart of forming consumer prices. There are three key points in the matter.

1. Transmission losses between the raw product prices and consumer prices are very significant, so much so that in the American case the correlation between the two series is only 10%.

2. The profile of labour costs, and especially those per unit of output (the former from which the evolution of labour productivity is subtracted), shapes, with a delay of a few quarters, the profile of consumer prices. The messages sent by the front end of this relationship are not worrying. Unemployment is still far from its pre-COVID-19 level and businesses are putting a lot of emphasis on the need to improve their efficiency.

3. Inflation expectations play a significant role in the formation of prices. Indeed, the stability of expectations is the guarantor of the stability of prices. The reasoning behind this is as follows: if all consumers start to believe that prices will accelerate, they will together precipitate purchasing decisions. The imbalance, which is most often inevitable, between a sudden increase in demand and an offer that struggles to adapt quickly leads to the phenomenon of price acceleration. This phenomenon will escalate and become permanent if labour costs follow prices. It would then be justified to talk about inflation. Let’s say that, for the time being at least, expectations have done quite well in resisting the “fuss” generated by these somewhat sharp increases in consumer prices.

China: transmission losses between production price index (PPI) and core consumer price index (CPI)

US: key role of unit labour costs in the formation of retail prices

To conclude on this second analytical point, the risk of “cyclical” inflation seems rather limited at the moment.

Finally, despite the explicit wish and will to return to normal once the pandemic is behind us, shouldn’t we question the changes that it has brought about? Let’s ask three questions:

1. How can we eliminate the divergences generated by the health crisis (countries, sectors, companies and households, employment and savings)?

2. What will be the effect of the rise in debt (public and private)?

3. How can we normalise an economic policy that is so highly accommodating?

It is precisely because these questions exist that the resolve behind current economic policy is both remaining and transforming. The best illustration of the approach can be found in the United States in the High Pressure Economy. Its ambition is threefold: to prevent a decline in potential growth, to reorientate the economy towards the future (digital, environment and education/training) and to galvanise both supply and demand. This requires an increase in public demand and an increase in transfers, with the idea that private spending will follow. At the same time, it is also necessary to ensure that sectoral and structural policies contribute to the corresponding supply side changes, higher productivity gains and more jobs, all while avoiding excessive timing differences between the respective upward shifts in demand and supply. Otherwise, there would be a risk of creating less reasonable price conditions. Further, there is no point trying to hide it: there is an element of “creative destruction”’ in the approach taken.

THREE DEVELOPMENTS ARE STARTING TO APPEAR.

1. The questioning of the triptych – movements (goods and people) / concentration (locations of production and possibly companies) / hyperconsumption – because of the constraints of sustainable development

2. The rebuilding of productive supply (air transport, tourism, automotive, etc.)

3. The matching of labour supply and demand with both labour shortages and excesses.

We have to admit that we are not facing a classic, cyclical sequence. Adjusting economic policy may not be appropriate (stimulus either poorly calibrated or ill-suited), and structural and sectoral changes may generate imbalances at the macroeconomic level; price acceleration would be an indicator of this. Of course, so far, this is all conjecture, but we have a duty to remain vigilant.

LET’S LOOK AT THE THREE CONCLUSIONS THAT WE HAVE REACHED:

The temporary is not made to last ; the cyclical sequences are not sending any particularly worrying messages in terms of prices today or in the near future; the mix, formed through economic policy initiatives and structural changes currently being set in motion, should be closely monitored because it could be a source of imbalances, including greater inflation. A certain historical reference may be worth considering: the years following the end of World War II. Indeed, this period had a need both to support the economy and to reabsorb the imbalance between an awakening civilian demand and a then very military supply. All of this forced structural and sectoral developments. But beware: even if there is a certain resonance in terms of the sequences, the issue of time is perceived differently. It was necessary to move very quickly 75 years ago, but many believe, rightly or wrongly, that time pressure is less intense today. As such, neither policy initiatives nor structural changes would be of such a magnitude and speed to generate serious imbalances, including the likes of more inflation.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #2 – The Academic Insight

Considerations on public debt

Jean-Marc Daniel
French economist, Professor at ESCP Business School

By replacing corporate debt, the economic support policies linked to COVID-19 have sent public debt levels through the roof globally. According to the IMF, global public debt should increase from 83% of GDP at the end of 2019 to 100% at the end of 2021. At that time, this ratio is expected to reach 119% in France, 158% in Italy and… 264% in Japan. Yet, many of the comments brought about by this explosion are absurd.

FOUR MISCONCEPTIONS ARE OFTEN SPREAD ABOUT PUBLIC DEBT.

The first is that it constitutes a burden that one generation transfers to the next. However, as early as the 18th century, Jean-François Melon demonstrated the approximative nature of such a claim. Melon, the secretary of the famous John Law at the time when the latter was propounding his public debt monetisation policy, sought to justify himself after the policy’s failure. He gave his view on what happened in his Essai politique sur le commerce (Political essay on trade) where he declared:

“THROUGH PUBLIC DEBT, THE COUNTRY IS LENDING TO ITSELF.”

He insists on the fact that public debt does not effect a transfer from one generation to another but rather from one social group, taxpayers, to another, the holders of public securities, who receive the interest.

The second misconception is that the repayment of debt presents a threat to public finances. Some therefore suggest issuing perpetual debt, so that it will never have to be repaid. However, it just so happens that, in practice, public debt is already perpetual. Indeed, governments do little more than pay interest. Since the beginning of the 19th century, no entry has been made in a government’s budget for the repayment of its debt. Each time a loan comes to maturity, it is immediately replaced.

The third misconception about public debt is that a precipitous rise in interest rates would constitute a threat; after all, the government’s concrete and formal commitment is to pay interest. The increasing scarcity of potential lenders would generate this rise in rates and would restrict the opportunities for governments to borrow. However, every modern economy has a central bank acting as lender as a last resort. As a result, banks have no problem buying debt that they can subsequently dispose of by selling it back to central banks – and they do so without limit. The effective interest rate and the amount of debt held by private players ultimately depend on the action of the central bank. Incidentally, the status of the US central bank, the Federal Reserve, is explicitly defined in its mission:

“Maintain long run growth of the monetary and credit aggregates commensurate with the economy’s long run potential to increase production, so as to promote effectively the goals of maximum employment, stable prices, and moderate long-term interest rates.”

Though independent, central banks now maintain very low rates with the clear aim of alleviating the cost of interest for governments. In addition, as the central bank transfers back to the government the debt interest that the latter pays to the former, the portion of public debt owned by the central bank is free, which systematically reduces the average interest rate paid by the government. The situation in Japan presents an illustrative example of this. According to the OECD, its public debt/GDP ratio stood at 226% in 2019. The Japanese government quite calmly considers that this ratio will reach 600% in 2060. Its insouciance can be attributed to the fact that its net interest costs amounted to almost zero in 2019, thanks to an ultra-accommodating monetary policy and half of public debt being owned by the country’s central bank.

Finally, the fourth misconception is that there would be a division between good debt and bad debt.

Good public debt would finance investment; bad public debt would finance operations. This division makes little sense: it is based on taking the thinking behind private debt and applying it to public debt. It assumes that public investment spending prepares for the future, whilst public operational spending sacrifices the future for the present. However, it is easy to see that the salary of a researcher, whose work will lead to technical progress and therefore more growth, is operational spending, whilst the construction of a road leading nowhere corresponds to investment spending…

Nevertheless, the idea of good and bad debt should be detailed further because, in certain conditions, it should guide fiscal policy. Incidentally, our ancestors had identified the problem.

For a long time, religious authorities considered that remunerating a loan was tantamount to usury.

Their reasoning became more refined over time, to the extent that in the 13th century, Saint Thomas Aquinas could write:

“He who lends money transfers the ownership of the money to the borrower. Hence the borrower holds the money at his own risk and is bound to pay it all back: wherefore the lender must not exact more. On the other hand he that entrusts his money to a merchant or craftsman so as to form a kind of society, does not transfer the ownership of his money to them, for it remains his, so that at his risk the merchant speculates with it, or the craftsman uses it for his craft, and consequently he may lawfully demand as something belonging to him, part of the profits derived from his money.”

The nascent political economy then distinguished between two types of loan: on the one hand, there were “commercial” loans, also known as “production loans”, which financed investments and the emergence of future wealth, creating something on which to pay interest; on the other hand, there were loans aimed at helping those in difficulty, called “consumer loans”, which follow the same line of thinking as donations and should therefore be free.

The modern materialisation of Saint Thomas Aquinas reflections leads to the following affirmation: private debt is justified when financing investment that brings a structural improvement to growth, whilst public debt is justified in response to cyclical hazards, ensuring collective solidarity with economic sectors in difficulty due to cyclical fluctuations.

European treaties are based on these principles, the “Treaty on stability, coordination and governance in particular.”

THIS TREATY STIPULATES:

The budgetary position of the general government of a Contracting Party shall be balanced or in surplus; [this] rule shall be deemed to be respected if the annual structural balance of the general government [falls within] a lower limit of a structural deficit of 0,5 % of the gross domestic product at market prices.

It confirms the distinction between a “good deficit” – the circumstantial deficit, which appears when growth is struggling and disappears when growth is sustained – and a “bad deficit” – the structural deficit, which is independent of the cycle and remains no matter the circumstances.

What is worrying today is that we are moving away from this scheme, which is not without negative consequences. The first of these consequences relates to equality between supply and demand. Any public expenditure that is not financed by a tax on private spending increases demand. If this increase lasts, it will lead to one of two situations: an external contribution, that is, a deepening trade deficit, or the opportunity for the production system to increase its prices, that is, a boost to inflation.

The second negative consequence relates to an increase in public debt generating negative expectations for private players.

First, the instinct to save in order to prepare for an uncertain financial future brought about by the accumulation of debt leads to an increase in asset prices – property bubbles might be the most obvious materialisation of this phenomenon. This is what economists call “Ricardian equivalence”.

Second, these negative expectations erode the credibility of the currency.

Countries (like Lebanon) that see their currencies disappear in favour of the dollar because of a surge in public debt are rare. Nevertheless, we are witnessing a resurgence of gold, which remains the ultimate monetary recourse in the collective unconscious, a resurgence underlined by the soaring price of this precious metal.

All this to say that it is time to put an end to the “no matter the cost”, even if the cessation of payments of the government is not on the agenda.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #2 – The Cultural Corner

Coming out of a crisis, but what are we heading into?

Sophie Chassat
Philosopher, partner at Wemean

The metaphor is a medical one: a crisis is the “critical” moment where everything can change one way or the other – the moment of vitality or the moment of mortality. It would seem, however, that things might not be so clear-cut and that, as Gramsci put it, a crisis instead takes the form of an “interregnum”, “consist[ing] precisely in the fact that the old is dying and the new cannot be born”. What will come out of all this? The suspense… Whatever the answer, it may well come out of left field.

This is what we’re currently feeling: a not very comfortable in-between, and we don’t know where it will lead us. The new world is not coming, and the old world is not coming back, even if, like the characters in Camus’s The Plague, we blithely or even unconsciously take up our old habits again as soon as the storm passes. Yet, at the same time, we know that something has changed, that this crisis has been, in the truest sense, an “experience”, a word whose etymology means “out of peril” (from the Latin ex-periri). Indeed, coming out of a crisis means always coming through and learning a lesson from it. The ordeal inevitably sees us transformed.

But what would be a “good” way to come out of a crisis? A way that would mean coming out on top and not crashing out? For the philosopher Georges Canguilhem, “The measure of health is a certain capacity to overcome organic crises and to establish a new physiological order, different from the old. Health is the luxury of being able to fall ill and recover.”

Overcoming a crisis is inventing a new way of life to adapt to an unprecedented situation. Indeed, health is the ability to create new ways of life, whilst illness can be seen as an inability to innovate. We must also be wary of all the semantics that suggest a return to the same or the simple conclusion of a certain state: “restarting”, “resuming”, “returning to normal”, “lifting lockdown”.

Inventing, creating… that’s what will truly and vitally take us out of the crisis. As another philosopher, Bruno Latour, put it from the very fi rst lockdown, “if we don’t take advantage of this unbelievable situation to change, it’s a waste of a crisis”. That’s why we must also see this period of coming out of a crisis as an occasion to come out of our mental bubbles and leave our prejudices behind. And let’s not forget to question the meaning of our decisions: why do we want to change? What new era do we want to head into, knowing that other crises are waiting for us? The thicker the fog, the stronger and further our headlights must shine.

____________

1 “The crisis consists precisely in the fact that the old is dying and the new cannot be born; in this interregnum a great variety of morbid symptoms appear.” Antonio Gramsci, Prison notebooks (written between 1929 and 1935).

2 “For the moment he wished to behave like all those others around him, who believed, or made believe, that plague can come and go without changing anything in men’s hearts.” Albert Camus, The Plague (1947).

3 Georges Canguilhem, “On the Normal and the Pathological”, in. Knowledge of Life (2008).

4 Le Grand Entretien, France Inter, 3 April 2020.

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #2 – Industry Insight

The aeronautics industry is feeling the heat

Philippe Delmas
Senior Advisor – Aerospace & Defence,
Accuracy

Christophe Leclerc
Partner,
Accuracy

Jean-François Partiot
Partner,
Accuracy

Air transport is at the top of the list when it comes to sectors most heavily affected by the COVID-19 crisis. Behind it, the entire aeronautics industry is suffering, from manufacturers to equipment suppliers of all sizes. The shock is all the more brutal as annual growth stood on average at 5% over the past 40 years and was forecast to continue at over 4% a year for the decades to come.

In 2020, air traffic fell by 66% compared with 2019, and both the timing and the extent of its recovery remain uncertain. For domestic flights in large countries, recovery will depend on the speed and efficiency of vaccination efforts. It is already strong in the United States (traffic was only 31% lower in March 2021 than in March 2019) and China (+11% higher), but it remains weak in the European Union (63% lower). For international flights, recovery will depend on lockdowns linked to the emergence of new variants and the rate of vaccination in each country, not to mention the confidence that countries will have in each other’s efforts to contain the coronavirus. This recovery is currently very weak. In total, the level of traffic in 2021 will remain much lower than historical levels. At the end of April 2021, the IATA forecast world air traffic at 43% of the level in 2019 (compared with a forecast of 51% in December). Globally, a return to the 2019 level of activity will no doubt have to wait until mid-2022 for domestic flights and 2023, or even 2024, for long-haul flights. Only air freight has experienced continued growth, but it represents less than 10% of all air traffic.

Several factors lead us to consider that air traffic is not yet ready for a return to the long-lasting growth experienced in the decades before the crisis (5% a year from 1980 to 2019), and various arguments reinforce this vision:

– Passengers’ ecological concerns are becoming of prime importance – some will be more reluctant to travel and especially to travel far.

– Large groups have got through the COVID-19 crisis by completely stopping all business travel: short, medium and long haul.

It was an abrupt lesson, with radical conclusions favouring the strict limitation of such travel. As a result, these groups generated significant savings, as well as an improved ecological balance sheet, something monitored by the markets more and more closely. According to the leaders of major European groups surveyed at the end of 2020, business travel may permanently fall by 25% to 40% compared with 2019.

– These two factors are already enough to bring about a significant drop in traffic, but this drop will be compounded by a third factor, an immediate consequence of an airline’s economic model: first class and business class passengers are the major levers of profitability for a long-haul flight. If their traffic is reduced by 25% to 40%, airlines will have no other choice but to increase average prices significantly for all passenger classes.

The impact on prices of the change in behaviour should lead to a new economic balance: a reduction in business class volumes of 30% may lead to an average increase in ticket prices (business and economy) of 15%. With a price/volume elasticity of 0.9, an average fall in economy travel of 13.5% can be expected.

To sum this up, the forecast impact on passenger traffic could be as follows:

– A fall in business class and first class passenger numbers of 30%
– A fall in economy class passenger numbers of 13.5%
– An increase in average sales prices of 15%.

In our opinion, the sudden turbulence in the industry presents a unique opportunity for it to restructure; its untenable financial situation obliges it to do so. The air transport sector has taken out debt of over $250 billion since the beginning of the pandemic, and its total net debt should exceed its revenues during the course of 2021 or in early 2022. Today, the sector continues to lose tens of billions of dollars in cash each quarter, contributing to the rise in its debt levels.

The industry will be forced to overhaul its model significantly, especially given that this economic constraint doubles up as an ecological constraint that is just as fierce. Indeed, air travel is a substantial emitter of CO2, representing up to 2.5% of emissions globally and around 4% in the European Union. In addition, air travel suaffers another constraint that is specific to the sector, namely that CO2 represents only a fraction of its overall climatic impact. The most recent studies (July 2020) confirm that its emissions of nitric oxide (NO) at high altitudes contribute more to global warming than its emissions of CO2.

In total, air travel alone represents 5–6% of humanity’s impact on the climate. But it is not for lack of trying – the industry has been making substantial efforts. CO2 emissions per passenger kilometre have shrunk by 56% since 1990, one of the best performances of all industries. The total emitted tonnage of CO2 has nevertheless doubled over the same period because of the increase in traffic. Ryanair, the European low-cost leader, summarises the climatic impasse of air transport quite nicely: its aeroplanes are very recent, their occupancy at a maximum (average rate of 95%), but it is the company with the highest CO2 emissions in Europe after nine operators of coal power plants.

Technological progress will continue but, for aeroplanes as we know them, it will not be accelerating. As for truly new technologies (hydrogen, electricity), their time will undoubtedly come, but too late to play a significant role in meeting the object ives o f the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 2050, that is, limiting global warming to 1.5°C and net carbon emissions to zero.

In this context, the industry must reinvent itself, taking into account the following points:

– Growth in traffic will for a long time remain lower than the growth seen in previous decades.
– Progress in energy efficiency will continue but will not accelerate.
– This progress should be completed by credible and rapid climatic solutions (i.e. not offsetting), like clean fuel. Boeing and Airbus recently announced, in spring 2021, their desire to accelerate their use of green kerosene quickly and significantly. But the volumes will be insufficient to meet the objectives of the IPCC.
– The serious issue of high-altitude emissions – currently left out of the equation – will have to be dealt with.
– Owing to and considering the cost of decarbonisation solutions, the cost of air travel will inevitably increase by a significant margin.
– This increase will weigh heavily on the most price-sensitive traffic, tourism, whilst technology will clearly and permanently reduce “high contribution” traffic.
– Combined with a concerning debt situation, these factors will force a complete overhaul of the economic model of air transport.

Despite this severe assessment, we think that there are ways for the industry to react radically and constructively. We will present some of them soon.

____________

1 Boeing and Airbus
2 International Air Transport Association (IATA)
3 Accuracy interviews with management of large groups
4 OECD, INSEE
5 IATA

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #2 – Start-up stories

Delfox

Romain Proglio
Partner, Accuracy

Founded in 2018 in Bordeaux, Delfox is an artificial intelligence platform that uses reinforcement learning to model systems able to evolve intelligently, autonomously and intuitively in a constantly changing environment, without human intervention or programming in advance.

The technology developed by Delfox consists in giving objectives to the AI, which must then find a way to achieve them. When it comes to AI, it is essential to understand that this intelligence is based above all on learning.

It is therefore learning mechanisms that lie at the heart of Delfox’s development, which has progressed significantly for over two years in cuttingedge skills like deep learning and reinforcement learning, as well a s the related advanced algorithms.

The goal is to teach a machine to react autonomously, without indicating how to resolve an issue. The machine itself proposes solutions, which will lead to rewards or penalties; it will therefore learn from its mistakes.

For example, teaching a drone to go from point A to point B does not mean telling it to avoid collisions or to accelerate at certain points of the journey; it is about letting it react by itself and rewarding or penalising it based on the solutions it proposes. Potential applications are vast.

There is, of course, the area of satellites, in which Delfox is already working with Ariane Group for space surveillance purposes. Delfox participates in detecting satellite trajectories based on data provided by the GEOTracker space surveillance network to avoid collisions and interference.

But the fields of application are a lot more extensive than just satellite uses: autonomous military and urban drones, cars, logistics, defence, the navy, and more are all potential areas of interest.

Autonomy will no doubt be a key segment of activity in the next decade, and Delfox is already one of the most successful players in the field. With a team of 15 people, Delfox aims to reach €1m in revenues in 2021 and is already working with Ariane Group, Dassault Aviation, Thales and the DGA (French government defence procurement and technology agency).

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #2 – One Partner, One View

Editorial

Nicolas Barsalou
Partner, Accuracy

THE CRISIS AND WHAT FOLLOWED*

The crisis that we have been experiencing for almost one and half years now has no equivalent in modern history. It is neither a classic cyclical crisis, nor a replica of the great financial crisis of 2008. It would be dangerous to think, therefore, that we are coming out of it in the same way as previous crises.

What are we seeing? Two words enable us to deepen the analysis.

The first is “contrast”. This is, of course, not the first time that an economic crisis has affected some geographies more severely than others, particularly, in this case, Europe more than the Far East. However, it is the first time that we observe such diversity in the impact on different economic sectors. As a result, some affected sectors will take several years to return to their situation in 2019, like air transport or tourism for example. Conversely, other sectors have taken advantage of the crisis, like online activities (e-commerce, streaming services, video games), or have served as “safe investments”, like luxury goods.

The second word is without a doubt “uncertainty”. Given the tense geopolitical context and unprecedented capital injections in the economy, the current bright spell may lead in the relatively short term to another more classic crisis, made all the more dangerous as recent wounds will not have healed.

As advisers to innumerable economic players across the world, we observe an unprecedented de-correlation between certain market situations and the general state of the economy. On the one hand, the mergers and acquisitions market, boosted by an unparalleled level of liquidity, has rarely – if ever – experienced such exuberance both in volumes and in prices, and this was the case well before the crisis emerged. On the other hand, the corporate restructuring market is also very active, carried in particular by bank renegotiations for certain sectors in difficulty.

This paradox exists in appearance only: given the elements mentioned above, it is possible and quite natural to observe these two trends at the same time.

In this context, we think that, now more than ever, financial and economic players should avoid sheeplike behaviour and analyse each situation in an individualised and tailor-made way.

The most interesting cases to consider are certainly those sectors that are experiencing both positive and negative trends. The real estate sector is particularly relevant because it is undergoing profound and long-lasting change, combined with the effects of the last crisis. Let’s look at two representative sub-sectors: retail and office property.

The first has long been affected by the strong and continued development of e-commerce, a phenomenon that accelerated in 2020 under the effects of the lockdown and the closure of numerous shopping centres, to the extent that the value of retail property at the end of last year was at a historic low. Our long-held belief is that this fall in values was excessive, characteristic of the sheep like behaviour mentioned above and not adapted to the modern economy. Centres that are well located, well managed and well equipped will continue to be major players in retail. It is fortunate that, for a few weeks now, others are beginning to realise this and that these property values are rising again.

The second sub-sector benefitted up to the 2020 crisis from a favourable situation, thanks to a structural mismatch between supply and demand and real interest rates at zero that pushed up the so-called “safe investment” values like property. Moreover, the crisis has until now had little impact: for the most part, rent has continued to be paid and, given an extremely accommodating monetary policy, capitalisation rates and therefore values have changed little. But these two parameters are now threatened. The rise of remote working, if it proves to be long-lasting and significant (more than just one or two days a week), will inevitably have considerable consequences on the number of square metres necessary for office space as well as its location. Not all of these impacts will necessarily be negative: though it is certain that large business centres like La Défense and Canary Wharf are suffering and will continue to suffer, central business districts may see their values and occupation rates continue to rise.

As for macroeconomic parameters, and notably inflation, only an oracle could predict how they will develop: the only thing to do is to remain vigilant and to provide the means to minimise fragility through strategies that favour flexibility and agility. In this respect, it will be essential to monitor the development of the banking sector, but that would be a topic for another discussion…

* “THE MYRTLES HAVE FLOWERS THAT SPEAK OF THE STARS AND IT IS FROM MY PAIN THAT THE DAY IS MADE THE DEEPER THE SEA AND THE WHITER THE SAIL AND THE MORE BITTER THE EVIL THE MORE WONDERFUL THE GOOD”

LOUIS ARAGON
“THE WAR AND WHAT FOLLOWED” (FROM THE UNFINISHED NOVEL)

< Read more from Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #2

For the second edition of Accuracy Talks Straight, Nicolas Barsalou gives us his point of view on the way out of the crisis, before letting Romain Proglio introduce us to Delfox, a start-up specialising in artificial intelligence. We will then analyse the impact of the crisis on the aeronautics sector with Philippe Delmas, Senior Aerospace & Defence advisor, Christophe Leclerc and Jean-François Partiot.
Sophie Chassat, philosopher and partner at Wemean, will invite us to explore the way out of the crisis from a cultural angle. Finally, we will focus on public debt with Jean-Marc Daniel, French economist and Professor at ESCP Business School, as well as on inflationary risk with Hervé Goulletquer, Senior Economic Advisor.


SUMMARY


Editorial

Nicolas Barsalou
Partner, Accuracy

THE CRISIS AND WHAT FOLLOWED*

The crisis that we have been experiencing for almost one and half years now has no equivalent in modern history. It is neither a classic cyclical crisis, nor a replica of the great financial crisis of 2008. It would be dangerous to think, therefore, that we are coming out of it in the same way as previous crises.

What are we seeing? Two words enable us to deepen the analysis.

The first is “contrast”. This is, of course, not the first time that an economic crisis has affected some geographies more severely than others, particularly, in this case, Europe more than the Far East. However, it is the first time that we observe such diversity in the impact on different economic sectors. As a result, some affected sectors will take several years to return to their situation in 2019, like air transport or tourism for example. Conversely, other sectors have taken advantage of the crisis, like online activities (e-commerce, streaming services, video games), or have served as “safe investments”, like luxury goods.

The second word is without a doubt “uncertainty”. Given the tense geopolitical context and unprecedented capital injections in the economy, the current bright spell may lead in the relatively short term to another more classic crisis, made all the more dangerous as recent wounds will not have healed.

As advisers to innumerable economic players across the world, we observe an unprecedented de-correlation between certain market situations and the general state of the economy. On the one hand, the mergers and acquisitions market, boosted by an unparalleled level of liquidity, has rarely – if ever – experienced such exuberance both in volumes and in prices, and this was the case well before the crisis emerged. On the other hand, the corporate restructuring market is also very active, carried in particular by bank renegotiations for certain sectors in difficulty.

This paradox exists in appearance only: given the elements mentioned above, it is possible and quite natural to observe these two trends at the same time.

In this context, we think that, now more than ever, financial and economic players should avoid sheeplike behaviour and analyse each situation in an individualised and tailor-made way.

The most interesting cases to consider are certainly those sectors that are experiencing both positive and negative trends. The real estate sector is particularly relevant because it is undergoing profound and long-lasting change, combined with the effects of the last crisis. Let’s look at two representative sub-sectors: retail and office property.

The first has long been affected by the strong and continued development of e-commerce, a phenomenon that accelerated in 2020 under the effects of the lockdown and the closure of numerous shopping centres, to the extent that the value of retail property at the end of last year was at a historic low. Our long-held belief is that this fall in values was excessive, characteristic of the sheep like behaviour mentioned above and not adapted to the modern economy. Centres that are well located, well managed and well equipped will continue to be major players in retail. It is fortunate that, for a few weeks now, others are beginning to realise this and that these property values are rising again.

The second sub-sector benefitted up to the 2020 crisis from a favourable situation, thanks to a structural mismatch between supply and demand and real interest rates at zero that pushed up the so-called “safe investment” values like property. Moreover, the crisis has until now had little impact: for the most part, rent has continued to be paid and, given an extremely accommodating monetary policy, capitalisation rates and therefore values have changed little. But these two parameters are now threatened. The rise of remote working, if it proves to be long-lasting and significant (more than just one or two days a week), will inevitably have considerable consequences on the number of square metres necessary for office space as well as its location. Not all of these impacts will necessarily be negative: though it is certain that large business centres like La Défense and Canary Wharf are suffering and will continue to suffer, central business districts may see their values and occupation rates continue to rise.

As for macroeconomic parameters, and notably inflation, only an oracle could predict how they will develop: the only thing to do is to remain vigilant and to provide the means to minimise fragility through strategies that favour flexibility and agility. In this respect, it will be essential to monitor the development of the banking sector, but that would be a topic for another discussion…

* “THE MYRTLES HAVE FLOWERS THAT SPEAK OF THE STARS AND IT IS FROM MY PAIN THAT THE DAY IS MADE THE DEEPER THE SEA AND THE WHITER THE SAIL AND THE MORE BITTER THE EVIL THE MORE WONDERFUL THE GOOD”

LOUIS ARAGON
“THE WAR AND WHAT FOLLOWED” (FROM THE UNFINISHED NOVEL)


Delfox

Romain Proglio
Partner, Accuracy

Founded in 2018 in Bordeaux, Delfox is an artificial intelligence platform that uses reinforcement learning to model systems able to evolve intelligently, autonomously and intuitively in a constantly changing environment, without human intervention or programming in advance.

The technology developed by Delfox consists in giving objectives to the AI, which must then find a way to achieve them. When it comes to AI, it is essential to understand that this intelligence is based above all on learning.

It is therefore learning mechanisms that lie at the heart of Delfox’s development, which has progressed significantly for over two years in cuttingedge skills like deep learning and reinforcement learning, as well a s the related advanced algorithms.

The goal is to teach a machine to react autonomously, without indicating how to resolve an issue. The machine itself proposes solutions, which will lead to rewards or penalties; it will therefore learn from its mistakes.

For example, teaching a drone to go from point A to point B does not mean telling it to avoid collisions or to accelerate at certain points of the journey; it is about letting it react by itself and rewarding or penalising it based on the solutions it proposes. Potential applications are vast.

There is, of course, the area of satellites, in which Delfox is already working with Ariane Group for space surveillance purposes. Delfox participates in detecting satellite trajectories based on data provided by the GEOTracker space surveillance network to avoid collisions and interference.

But the fields of application are a lot more extensive than just satellite uses: autonomous military and urban drones, cars, logistics, defence, the navy, and more are all potential areas of interest.

Autonomy will no doubt be a key segment of activity in the next decade, and Delfox is already one of the most successful players in the field. With a team of 15 people, Delfox aims to reach €1m in revenues in 2021 and is already working with Ariane Group, Dassault Aviation, Thales and the DGA (French government defence procurement and technology agency).


The aeronautics industry is feeling the heat

Philippe Delmas
Senior Advisor – Aerospace & Defence,
Accuracy

Christophe Leclerc
Partner,
Accuracy

Jean-François Partiot
Partner,
Accuracy

Air transport is at the top of the list when it comes to sectors most heavily affected by the COVID-19 crisis. Behind it, the entire aeronautics industry is suffering, from manufacturers to equipment suppliers of all sizes. The shock is all the more brutal as annual growth stood on average at 5% over the past 40 years and was forecast to continue at over 4% a year for the decades to come.

In 2020, air traffic fell by 66% compared with 2019, and both the timing and the extent of its recovery remain uncertain. For domestic flights in large countries, recovery will depend on the speed and efficiency of vaccination efforts. It is already strong in the United States (traffic was only 31% lower in March 2021 than in March 2019) and China (+11% higher), but it remains weak in the European Union (63% lower). For international flights, recovery will depend on lockdowns linked to the emergence of new variants and the rate of vaccination in each country, not to mention the confidence that countries will have in each other’s efforts to contain the coronavirus. This recovery is currently very weak. In total, the level of traffic in 2021 will remain much lower than historical levels. At the end of April 2021, the IATA forecast world air traffic at 43% of the level in 2019 (compared with a forecast of 51% in December). Globally, a return to the 2019 level of activity will no doubt have to wait until mid-2022 for domestic flights and 2023, or even 2024, for long-haul flights. Only air freight has experienced continued growth, but it represents less than 10% of all air traffic.

Several factors lead us to consider that air traffic is not yet ready for a return to the long-lasting growth experienced in the decades before the crisis (5% a year from 1980 to 2019), and various arguments reinforce this vision:

– Passengers’ ecological concerns are becoming of prime importance – some will be more reluctant to travel and especially to travel far.

– Large groups have got through the COVID-19 crisis by completely stopping all business travel: short, medium and long haul.

It was an abrupt lesson, with radical conclusions favouring the strict limitation of such travel. As a result, these groups generated significant savings, as well as an improved ecological balance sheet, something monitored by the markets more and more closely. According to the leaders of major European groups surveyed at the end of 2020, business travel may permanently fall by 25% to 40% compared with 2019.

– These two factors are already enough to bring about a significant drop in traffic, but this drop will be compounded by a third factor, an immediate consequence of an airline’s economic model: first class and business class passengers are the major levers of profitability for a long-haul flight. If their traffic is reduced by 25% to 40%, airlines will have no other choice but to increase average prices significantly for all passenger classes.

The impact on prices of the change in behaviour should lead to a new economic balance: a reduction in business class volumes of 30% may lead to an average increase in ticket prices (business and economy) of 15%. With a price/volume elasticity of 0.9, an average fall in economy travel of 13.5% can be expected.

To sum this up, the forecast impact on passenger traffic could be as follows:

– A fall in business class and first class passenger numbers of 30%
– A fall in economy class passenger numbers of 13.5%
– An increase in average sales prices of 15%.

In our opinion, the sudden turbulence in the industry presents a unique opportunity for it to restructure; its untenable financial situation obliges it to do so. The air transport sector has taken out debt of over $250 billion since the beginning of the pandemic, and its total net debt should exceed its revenues during the course of 2021 or in early 2022. Today, the sector continues to lose tens of billions of dollars in cash each quarter, contributing to the rise in its debt levels.

The industry will be forced to overhaul its model significantly, especially given that this economic constraint doubles up as an ecological constraint that is just as fierce. Indeed, air travel is a substantial emitter of CO2, representing up to 2.5% of emissions globally and around 4% in the European Union. In addition, air travel suaffers another constraint that is specific to the sector, namely that CO2 represents only a fraction of its overall climatic impact. The most recent studies (July 2020) confirm that its emissions of nitric oxide (NO) at high altitudes contribute more to global warming than its emissions of CO2.

In total, air travel alone represents 5–6% of humanity’s impact on the climate. But it is not for lack of trying – the industry has been making substantial efforts. CO2 emissions per passenger kilometre have shrunk by 56% since 1990, one of the best performances of all industries. The total emitted tonnage of CO2 has nevertheless doubled over the same period because of the increase in traffic. Ryanair, the European low-cost leader, summarises the climatic impasse of air transport quite nicely: its aeroplanes are very recent, their occupancy at a maximum (average rate of 95%), but it is the company with the highest CO2 emissions in Europe after nine operators of coal power plants.

Technological progress will continue but, for aeroplanes as we know them, it will not be accelerating. As for truly new technologies (hydrogen, electricity), their time will undoubtedly come, but too late to play a significant role in meeting the object ives o f the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 2050, that is, limiting global warming to 1.5°C and net carbon emissions to zero.

In this context, the industry must reinvent itself, taking into account the following points:

– Growth in traffic will for a long time remain lower than the growth seen in previous decades.
– Progress in energy efficiency will continue but will not accelerate.
– This progress should be completed by credible and rapid climatic solutions (i.e. not offsetting), like clean fuel. Boeing and Airbus recently announced, in spring 2021, their desire to accelerate their use of green kerosene quickly and significantly. But the volumes will be insufficient to meet the objectives of the IPCC.
– The serious issue of high-altitude emissions – currently left out of the equation – will have to be dealt with.
– Owing to and considering the cost of decarbonisation solutions, the cost of air travel will inevitably increase by a significant margin.
– This increase will weigh heavily on the most price-sensitive traffic, tourism, whilst technology will clearly and permanently reduce “high contribution” traffic.
– Combined with a concerning debt situation, these factors will force a complete overhaul of the economic model of air transport.

Despite this severe assessment, we think that there are ways for the industry to react radically and constructively. We will present some of them soon.

____________

1 Boeing and Airbus
2 International Air Transport Association (IATA)
3 Accuracy interviews with management of large groups
4 OECD, INSEE
5 IATA


Coming out of a crisis, but what are we heading into?

Sophie Chassat
Philosopher, partner at Wemean

The metaphor is a medical one: a crisis is the “critical” moment where everything can change one way or the other – the moment of vitality or the moment of mortality. It would seem, however, that things might not be so clear-cut and that, as Gramsci put it, a crisis instead takes the form of an “interregnum”, “consist[ing] precisely in the fact that the old is dying and the new cannot be born”. What will come out of all this? The suspense… Whatever the answer, it may well come out of left field.

This is what we’re currently feeling: a not very comfortable in-between, and we don’t know where it will lead us. The new world is not coming, and the old world is not coming back, even if, like the characters in Camus’s The Plague, we blithely or even unconsciously take up our old habits again as soon as the storm passes. Yet, at the same time, we know that something has changed, that this crisis has been, in the truest sense, an “experience”, a word whose etymology means “out of peril” (from the Latin ex-periri). Indeed, coming out of a crisis means always coming through and learning a lesson from it. The ordeal inevitably sees us transformed.

But what would be a “good” way to come out of a crisis? A way that would mean coming out on top and not crashing out? For the philosopher Georges Canguilhem, “The measure of health is a certain capacity to overcome organic crises and to establish a new physiological order, different from the old. Health is the luxury of being able to fall ill and recover.”

Overcoming a crisis is inventing a new way of life to adapt to an unprecedented situation. Indeed, health is the ability to create new ways of life, whilst illness can be seen as an inability to innovate. We must also be wary of all the semantics that suggest a return to the same or the simple conclusion of a certain state: “restarting”, “resuming”, “returning to normal”, “lifting lockdown”.

Inventing, creating… that’s what will truly and vitally take us out of the crisis. As another philosopher, Bruno Latour, put it from the very fi rst lockdown, “if we don’t take advantage of this unbelievable situation to change, it’s a waste of a crisis”. That’s why we must also see this period of coming out of a crisis as an occasion to come out of our mental bubbles and leave our prejudices behind. And let’s not forget to question the meaning of our decisions: why do we want to change? What new era do we want to head into, knowing that other crises are waiting for us? The thicker the fog, the stronger and further our headlights must shine.

____________

1 “The crisis consists precisely in the fact that the old is dying and the new cannot be born; in this interregnum a great variety of morbid symptoms appear.” Antonio Gramsci, Prison notebooks (written between 1929 and 1935).

2 “For the moment he wished to behave like all those others around him, who believed, or made believe, that plague can come and go without changing anything in men’s hearts.” Albert Camus, The Plague (1947).

3 Georges Canguilhem, “On the Normal and the Pathological”, in. Knowledge of Life (2008).

4 Le Grand Entretien, France Inter, 3 April 2020.


Considerations on public debt

Jean-Marc Daniel
French economist, Professor at ESCP Business School

By replacing corporate debt, the economic support policies linked to COVID-19 have sent public debt levels through the roof globally. According to the IMF, global public debt should increase from 83% of GDP at the end of 2019 to 100% at the end of 2021. At that time, this ratio is expected to reach 119% in France, 158% in Italy and… 264% in Japan. Yet, many of the comments brought about by this explosion are absurd.

FOUR MISCONCEPTIONS ARE OFTEN SPREAD ABOUT PUBLIC DEBT.

The first is that it constitutes a burden that one generation transfers to the next. However, as early as the 18th century, Jean-François Melon demonstrated the approximative nature of such a claim. Melon, the secretary of the famous John Law at the time when the latter was propounding his public debt monetisation policy, sought to justify himself after the policy’s failure. He gave his view on what happened in his Essai politique sur le commerce (Political essay on trade) where he declared:

“THROUGH PUBLIC DEBT, THE COUNTRY IS LENDING TO ITSELF.”

He insists on the fact that public debt does not effect a transfer from one generation to another but rather from one social group, taxpayers, to another, the holders of public securities, who receive the interest.

The second misconception is that the repayment of debt presents a threat to public finances. Some therefore suggest issuing perpetual debt, so that it will never have to be repaid. However, it just so happens that, in practice, public debt is already perpetual. Indeed, governments do little more than pay interest. Since the beginning of the 19th century, no entry has been made in a government’s budget for the repayment of its debt. Each time a loan comes to maturity, it is immediately replaced.

The third misconception about public debt is that a precipitous rise in interest rates would constitute a threat; after all, the government’s concrete and formal commitment is to pay interest. The increasing scarcity of potential lenders would generate this rise in rates and would restrict the opportunities for governments to borrow. However, every modern economy has a central bank acting as lender as a last resort. As a result, banks have no problem buying debt that they can subsequently dispose of by selling it back to central banks – and they do so without limit. The effective interest rate and the amount of debt held by private players ultimately depend on the action of the central bank. Incidentally, the status of the US central bank, the Federal Reserve, is explicitly defined in its mission:

“Maintain long run growth of the monetary and credit aggregates commensurate with the economy’s long run potential to increase production, so as to promote effectively the goals of maximum employment, stable prices, and moderate long-term interest rates.”

Though independent, central banks now maintain very low rates with the clear aim of alleviating the cost of interest for governments. In addition, as the central bank transfers back to the government the debt interest that the latter pays to the former, the portion of public debt owned by the central bank is free, which systematically reduces the average interest rate paid by the government. The situation in Japan presents an illustrative example of this. According to the OECD, its public debt/GDP ratio stood at 226% in 2019. The Japanese government quite calmly considers that this ratio will reach 600% in 2060. Its insouciance can be attributed to the fact that its net interest costs amounted to almost zero in 2019, thanks to an ultra-accommodating monetary policy and half of public debt being owned by the country’s central bank.

Finally, the fourth misconception is that there would be a division between good debt and bad debt.

Good public debt would finance investment; bad public debt would finance operations. This division makes little sense: it is based on taking the thinking behind private debt and applying it to public debt. It assumes that public investment spending prepares for the future, whilst public operational spending sacrifices the future for the present. However, it is easy to see that the salary of a researcher, whose work will lead to technical progress and therefore more growth, is operational spending, whilst the construction of a road leading nowhere corresponds to investment spending…

Nevertheless, the idea of good and bad debt should be detailed further because, in certain conditions, it should guide fiscal policy. Incidentally, our ancestors had identified the problem.

For a long time, religious authorities considered that remunerating a loan was tantamount to usury.

Their reasoning became more refined over time, to the extent that in the 13th century, Saint Thomas Aquinas could write:

“He who lends money transfers the ownership of the money to the borrower. Hence the borrower holds the money at his own risk and is bound to pay it all back: wherefore the lender must not exact more. On the other hand he that entrusts his money to a merchant or craftsman so as to form a kind of society, does not transfer the ownership of his money to them, for it remains his, so that at his risk the merchant speculates with it, or the craftsman uses it for his craft, and consequently he may lawfully demand as something belonging to him, part of the profits derived from his money.”

The nascent political economy then distinguished between two types of loan: on the one hand, there were “commercial” loans, also known as “production loans”, which financed investments and the emergence of future wealth, creating something on which to pay interest; on the other hand, there were loans aimed at helping those in difficulty, called “consumer loans”, which follow the same line of thinking as donations and should therefore be free.

The modern materialisation of Saint Thomas Aquinas reflections leads to the following affirmation: private debt is justified when financing investment that brings a structural improvement to growth, whilst public debt is justified in response to cyclical hazards, ensuring collective solidarity with economic sectors in difficulty due to cyclical fluctuations.

European treaties are based on these principles, the “Treaty on stability, coordination and governance in particular.”

THIS TREATY STIPULATES:

The budgetary position of the general government of a Contracting Party shall be balanced or in surplus; [this] rule shall be deemed to be respected if the annual structural balance of the general government [falls within] a lower limit of a structural deficit of 0,5 % of the gross domestic product at market prices.

It confirms the distinction between a “good deficit” – the circumstantial deficit, which appears when growth is struggling and disappears when growth is sustained – and a “bad deficit” – the structural deficit, which is independent of the cycle and remains no matter the circumstances.

What is worrying today is that we are moving away from this scheme, which is not without negative consequences. The first of these consequences relates to equality between supply and demand. Any public expenditure that is not financed by a tax on private spending increases demand. If this increase lasts, it will lead to one of two situations: an external contribution, that is, a deepening trade deficit, or the opportunity for the production system to increase its prices, that is, a boost to inflation.

The second negative consequence relates to an increase in public debt generating negative expectations for private players.

First, the instinct to save in order to prepare for an uncertain financial future brought about by the accumulation of debt leads to an increase in asset prices – property bubbles might be the most obvious materialisation of this phenomenon. This is what economists call “Ricardian equivalence”.

Second, these negative expectations erode the credibility of the currency.

Countries (like Lebanon) that see their currencies disappear in favour of the dollar because of a surge in public debt are rare. Nevertheless, we are witnessing a resurgence of gold, which remains the ultimate monetary recourse in the collective unconscious, a resurgence underlined by the soaring price of this precious metal.

All this to say that it is time to put an end to the “no matter the cost”, even if the cessation of payments of the government is not on the agenda.


Inflationary risk: where should we be looking?

Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Advisor, Accuracy

Let’s remember the time before the pandemic. Prices are reasonable. From the beginning of 2010 to the beginning of 2020, the average annual increase in consumer price indices, when we exclude particularly volatile items like energy and food products, reaches 1.8% in the United States and 1.1% in the eurozone. The 2% objective set by central banks is not met and even the very low rate of unemployment (at the beginning of last year, it was 3.5% in the US and 5% in Germany) seems unable to generate an acceleration, via more dynamic labour costs.

Labour market developments – deregulation and a decrease in the bargaining power of employees – may explain the majority of this result. A collective preference for saving over investment and the credibility of monetary policies are other explanations that can be put forward.

But it’s only after a COVID-19 crisis that has lasted almost a year and a half and a way out that is finally taking shape, at least in the US and Europe, that the price landscape seems to have been thrown upside down! In two months (April and May), this very same core of prices increases by 1.6% in the United States (a 10% annual rate!) and 0.7% in the eurozone (an annual rate of over 4%). Just what is going on? This price acceleration comes as somewhat of a (bad) surprise, particularly because the objective of economic policy, throughout the pandemic, has been to maintain productive capacities (companies and employees), so that activity can restart ‘like before’ when the public health conditions allow it.

So, in terms of prices, things may not be happening exactly as expected. What explanations can we give? Let’s start with three.

First, the reopening of an economy more or less “preserved” over a fairly long period requires rebalancing. Starting production again is not instantaneous, and demand during lockdown is not the same as demand during unlockdown. For supply, a raw materials index, like the S&P GSCI, increases by 65% over one year (and even 130% compared with the low point in April 2020). Similarly, the cost of sea freight increases over one year by more than 150%. As for demand, during this interim period between one economic state and another, two mechanisms of upward price distortion coexist. The goods or services that turned out to be the winners of the lockdown have still not relinquished their crowns; their prices remain dynamic. Those that were the losers can now “pick themselves back up”, or rather pick their prices back up! The two graphs below illustrate what is happening in the US.

Based on this two fold observation and at this stage of analysis, an initial conclusion emerges: the price acceleration phenomenon may very well prove temporary, as the central bankers keep telling us. The production circuit will get back up to “cruising speed”, and the concomitance of these two movements in the rise of certain retail prices is not expected to last.

US: price winners from unlockdown (4% of index)

US: price winners from lockdown (12% of index)

We must remember the mechanisms that are at the heart of forming consumer prices. There are three key points in the matter.

1. Transmission losses between the raw product prices and consumer prices are very significant, so much so that in the American case the correlation between the two series is only 10%.

2. The profile of labour costs, and especially those per unit of output (the former from which the evolution of labour productivity is subtracted), shapes, with a delay of a few quarters, the profile of consumer prices. The messages sent by the front end of this relationship are not worrying. Unemployment is still far from its pre-COVID-19 level and businesses are putting a lot of emphasis on the need to improve their efficiency.

3. Inflation expectations play a significant role in the formation of prices. Indeed, the stability of expectations is the guarantor of the stability of prices. The reasoning behind this is as follows: if all consumers start to believe that prices will accelerate, they will together precipitate purchasing decisions. The imbalance, which is most often inevitable, between a sudden increase in demand and an offer that struggles to adapt quickly leads to the phenomenon of price acceleration. This phenomenon will escalate and become permanent if labour costs follow prices. It would then be justified to talk about inflation. Let’s say that, for the time being at least, expectations have done quite well in resisting the “fuss” generated by these somewhat sharp increases in consumer prices.

China: transmission losses between production price index (PPI) and core consumer price index (CPI)

US: key role of unit labour costs in the formation of retail prices

To conclude on this second analytical point, the risk of “cyclical” inflation seems rather limited at the moment.

Finally, despite the explicit wish and will to return to normal once the pandemic is behind us, shouldn’t we question the changes that it has brought about? Let’s ask three questions:

1. How can we eliminate the divergences generated by the health crisis (countries, sectors, companies and households, employment and savings)?

2. What will be the effect of the rise in debt (public and private)?

3. How can we normalise an economic policy that is so highly accommodating?

It is precisely because these questions exist that the resolve behind current economic policy is both remaining and transforming. The best illustration of the approach can be found in the United States in the High Pressure Economy. Its ambition is threefold: to prevent a decline in potential growth, to reorientate the economy towards the future (digital, environment and education/training) and to galvanise both supply and demand. This requires an increase in public demand and an increase in transfers, with the idea that private spending will follow. At the same time, it is also necessary to ensure that sectoral and structural policies contribute to the corresponding supply side changes, higher productivity gains and more jobs, all while avoiding excessive timing differences between the respective upward shifts in demand and supply. Otherwise, there would be a risk of creating less reasonable price conditions. Further, there is no point trying to hide it: there is an element of “creative destruction”’ in the approach taken.

THREE DEVELOPMENTS ARE STARTING TO APPEAR.

1. The questioning of the triptych – movements (goods and people) / concentration (locations of production and possibly companies) / hyperconsumption – because of the constraints of sustainable development

2. The rebuilding of productive supply (air transport, tourism, automotive, etc.)

3. The matching of labour supply and demand with both labour shortages and excesses.

We have to admit that we are not facing a classic, cyclical sequence. Adjusting economic policy may not be appropriate (stimulus either poorly calibrated or ill-suited), and structural and sectoral changes may generate imbalances at the macroeconomic level; price acceleration would be an indicator of this. Of course, so far, this is all conjecture, but we have a duty to remain vigilant.

LET’S LOOK AT THE THREE CONCLUSIONS THAT WE HAVE REACHED:

The temporary is not made to last ; the cyclical sequences are not sending any particularly worrying messages in terms of prices today or in the near future; the mix, formed through economic policy initiatives and structural changes currently being set in motion, should be closely monitored because it could be a source of imbalances, including greater inflation. A certain historical reference may be worth considering: the years following the end of World War II. Indeed, this period had a need both to support the economy and to reabsorb the imbalance between an awakening civilian demand and a then very military supply. All of this forced structural and sectoral developments. But beware: even if there is a certain resonance in terms of the sequences, the issue of time is perceived differently. It was necessary to move very quickly 75 years ago, but many believe, rightly or wrongly, that time pressure is less intense today. As such, neither policy initiatives nor structural changes would be of such a magnitude and speed to generate serious imbalances, including the likes of more inflation.


Read the first edition of Accuracy Talks Straight >

Economic brief: what the figures tell us (#6)

This edition of the Economic Brief will see us focus on economic growth. More specifically, we will examine the economic growth lost during the COVID-19 crisis and the time lag in catching up to where we should be, contrasting the situation in China with that in the United States, Europe and elsewhere.

Accuracy Talks Straight #2 – Regard sur l’économie

Risque inflationniste : où regarder ?

Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Advisor

Souvenons-nous du temps d’avant la pandémie. Les prix étaient bien sages. De début 2010 à début 2020, la hausse moyenne annuelle des indices de prix à la consommation, dont on exclut les postes particulièrement volatils que sont l’énergie et les produits alimentaires, atteint 1,8% aux Etats-Unis et 1,1% en Zone Euro. L’objectif de 2% des banques centrales n’est pas respecté et même un taux de chômage très bas (en début d’année dernière il était de 3,5% outre-Atlantique et de 5% en Allemagne) parait être impuissant à provoquer une accélération, via des coûts salariaux plus dynamiques.

Les évolutions du marché du travail expliqueraient pour une grande partie ce résultat : la dérèglementation et la baisse du pouvoir de négociation des salariés. Une préférence collective pour l’épargne par rapport à l’investissement et la crédibilité des politiques monétaires sont les autres explications à mettre en avant.

Une crise de la COVID qui dure presqu’un an et demi, une sortie qui se dessine enfin, au moins aux Etats-Unis et en Europe, et voilà que le panorama des prix paraît chamboulé. En deux mois (avril et mai), ce même noyau dur des prix augmente de 1,6% aux Etats-Unis (10% en rythme annuel !) et de 0,7% en Zone Euro (soit plus de 4% en annualisé). Que se passe-t-il ? En sachant que la (mauvaise) surprise est d’autant plus grande que l’objectif de politique économique, tout au long de la pandémie, a été de préserver les capacités productives (entreprises et salariés), de telle sorte que l’activité puisse repartir « comme avant » lorsque les conditions sanitaires le permettraient.

Du côté des prix, les choses ne se passeraient donc peut-être pas comme prévues. Quelles explications peut-on avancer ? Proposons en trois.

D’abord, la réouverture d’une économie peu ou prou « misesous cloche » pendant un temps assez long nécessite un rééquilibrage. Relancer la production n’est pas instantané et la demande liée au confinement est différente de celle de la réouverture. Du côté de l’offre, un indice de matières premières, comme le S1P GSCI, est en hausse de 65% sur un an (et même de 130% par rapport au point bas d’avril 2020). De même, le coût du fret maritime a progressé sur un an de plus de 150%. Du côté de la demande, dans ce moment de passage d’un état de l’économie à l’autre, deux mécanismes de déformation à la hausse des prix cohabitent. Les biens ou les services, qui sont ressortis comme les gagnants du confinement, n’ont pas encore « abdiqué » ; leurs prix restent dynamiques. Ceux, qui ont été les perdants, peuvent désormais « relever la tête » ; ou pour mieux dire les tarifs ! Les deux graphiques* ci-dessous illustrent ce qui se passe aux Etats-Unis.

Fort de ce double constat et à ce stade de l’analyse, une première conclusion se dessine : le phénomène d’accélération des prix serait bien transitoire, comme le répètent les banquiers centraux. Les circuits de production vont retrouver un « régime de croisière » et la concomitance de ces deux mouvements d’emballement de certains prix au détail n’est pas appelée à durer.

Etats-Unis : les prix gagnants du déconfinement (4% de l’indice)

Etats-Unis : les prix gagnants du confinement (12% de l’indice)

Ensuite, il faut rappeler les mécanismes qui sont au coeur de la formation des prix à la consommation. Trois points sont clé en la matière.

1. La perte en ligne entre prix des produits bruts et prix à la consommation est très importante. Tant et si bien que dans le cas américain la corrélation entre les deux séries est de seulement 10%.

2. Le profil des coûts salariaux, et surtout de ceux par unité produite (les premiers dont on soustrait l’évolution de la productivité du travail), façonne, avec un retard d’un petit nombre de trimestres, celui des prix à la consommation. Les messages envoyés par l’amont de cette relation ne sont pas inquiétants. Le taux de chômage n’a pas, et de beaucoup, retrouvé le niveau d’avant l’épisode de la COVID et les entreprises insistent beaucoup sur la nécessité d’améliorer leur efficacité.

3. Les anticipations inflationnistes jouent un grand rôle dans la formation des prix. La stabilité des premières est la garante de celle des seconds. Le raisonnement est le suivant : si tous les consommateurs se mettent à croire que les prix vont accélérer, ils vont ensemble précipiter les décisions d’achat. Le déséquilibre, le plus souvent inévitable, entre une demande subitement plus marquée et une of fre qui a du mal à s’adapter rapidement, enclenche le phénomène d’accélération des prix. Celui-ci s’amplifiera et se pérennisera si les salaires s’ajustent au prix. Il sera alors justifié de parler d’inflation.

Disons que, pour le moment au moins, les anticipations ont plutôt bien résisté au « tintamarre » provoqué par ces quelques hausses un peu for tes des pr ix à la consommation.

Chine : la “perte en ligne” des prix à la production (IPP) au noyau dur des prix à la consommation (IPC)

Etats-Unis : le rôle-clé des coûts salariaux unitaires dans la formation des prix au détail

En conclusion de ce deuxième point analytique, le risque d’une inflation « cyclique » paraît peu présent à l’heure actuelle.

Enfin, malgré le souhait prononcé et la volonté affichée d’un retour à la normale une fois la pandémie mise derrière, ne doit-on pas s’interroger sur les changements induits par celle-ci ? POSONS ALORS TROIS QUESTIONS :

1. Comment éliminer les divergences générées par la crise sanitaire (pays, secteurs, entreprises et ménages (emploi et épargne) ?

2. Quel sera l’effet de la montée de l’endettement (public et privé) ?

3. Comment normaliser une politique économique très sollicitée ?

C’est bien parce que ces doutes sont présents que le volontarisme de politique économique à la fois demeure et se transforme. La meilleure illustration de la démarche est à rechercher outre-Atlantique dans la High Pressure Economy. Celle-ci a une triple ambition : empêcher un déclin de la croissance potentielle, réorienter l’économie vers demain (digital, environnement et éducation/formation) et dynamiser à la fois la demande et l’offre. Il faut à ce titre augmenter la demande publique et augmenter les transferts, dans l’idée que la dépense privée « suivra ». Il faut aussi et en même temps s’assurer que les politiques sectorielles et structurelles participent à la fois de l’offre correspondante, de gains de productivité plus élevés et de davantage d’emplois. Et ceci en évitant de trop importants décalages de calendrier entre les inflexions haussières respectives de la demande et de l’offre. Au risque sinon de créer les
conditions de prix moins sages.

De plus, Il ne faut pas se « cacher derrière son petit doigt ». Il y a une dimension « destruction créatrice » dans la démarche engagée.

TROIS ÉVOLUTIONS COMMENCENT DÉJÀ À APPARAÎTRE.

1. Une remise en cause du triptyque – mouvements (marchandises et personnes) / concentration (lieux de production et éventuellement entreprises) / hyperconsommation – pour cause de contrainte de développement durable.

2. Une recomposition du tissu productif (transport aérien, tourisme, automobile, …).

3. L’adéquation offre et demande de travail avec à la fois des pénuries et des excès de main d’oeuvre.

Il faut l’admettre : on n’est pas face à un déroulé à la fois cyclique et classique. Le réglage de la politique économique peut ne pas être adapté (un stimulus, ou mal calibré ou mal adapté) et les mutations structurelles et sectorielles peuvent générer des déséquilibres au niveau macroéconomique ; l’accélération des prix en serait un révélateur. Bien sûr, à aujourd’hui, tout ceci tient de la conjecture. Mais un devoir de vigilance apparaît.

REPRENONS LES TROIS CONCLUSIONS AUXQUELLES NOUS SOMMES ARRIVÉS :

Le transitoire n’est pas fait pour durer (!) ; les enchainements cycliques n’envoient pas de messages particulièrement inquiétants sur le profil des prix aujourd’hui et dans un avenir proche ; le mix, formé des initiatives de politique économique et des changements structurels en train de s’enclencher, est à suivre de près car il pourrait être source de déséquilibres, dont davantage d’inflation.

Il y a une référence historique à peut-être proposer : les années qui ont suivi la fin de la deuxième guerre mondiale, avec à la fois un besoin de soutenir l’économie et de résorber le déséquilibre entre une demande civile qui se réveille et une offre alors très militaire. Le tout forçant à des évolutions structurelles et sectorielles. Mais attention ; si une certaine résonnance au niveau des enchainements existe, l’enjeu de la maîtrise du temps est perçu différemment. Il fallait aller très vite il y a 75 ans ; beaucoup croient, à tort ou à raison, que la contrainte de calendrier est moins exigeante aujourd’hui. A ce titre, ni les initiatives de politique économique, ni les changements structurels ne seraient d’une ampleur et d’une vitesse telles qu’ils seraient générateurs de graves déséquilibres, dont davantage d’inflation.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #2 – L’angle académique

Considérations sur la dette publique

Jean-Marc Daniel
Économiste, professeur émérite à l’ESCP

Les politiques de soutien à l’économie liées à la Covid 19, en substituant de la dette au travail, ont fait exploser l’endettement public mondial. D’après le FMI, celui-ci devrait passer de 83% du PIB fin 2019 à 100% fin 2021. A cette date, ce ratio serait de 119% en France, de 158% en Italie et de … 264% au Japon. Or beaucoup des commentaires que suscite cette explosion sont saugrenus.

QUATRE IDÉES FAUSSES SONT SOUVENT VÉHICULÉES À PROPOS DE LA DETTE PUBLIQUE.

La première est qu’elle constitue un fardeau qu’une génération transmet à la génération suivante. Pourtant, dès le XVIIIe siècle, Jean-François Melon a montré le caractère approximatif d’une telle assertion. Ce secrétaire du célèbre John Law au moment où celui-ci mène sa politique de monétisation de la dette publique a cherché à se justifier après l’échec de cette politique. Il a donné sa vision de ce qui s’est passé dans un Essai politique sur le commerce où il énonce :

« PAR LA DETTE PUBLIQUE LE PAYS SE PRÊTE À LUI-MÊME. »

Il insiste sur le fait que la dette publique ne réalise pas un transfert d’une génération à l’autre mais d’un groupe social – les contribuables – vers un autre – les détenteurs de titres publics – qui perçoit les intérêts.

La deuxième est que le remboursement de la dette fait peser une menace sur les finances publiques. Certains proposent donc d’émettre de la dette perpétuelle pour ne pas avoir à la rembourser. Il se trouve qu’en pratique, la dette publique est déjà perpétuelle. En effet, les Etats se contentent de verser les intérêts. Depuis le début du XIXe siècle, aucun crédit n’est inscrit dans leur budget pour le remboursement de leur dette. Chaque fois qu’un emprunt arrive à échéance, il est immédiatement replacé.

La troisième est que c’est une hausse brutale des taux d’intérêt qui constituerait une menace puisque l’engagement concret et formel de l’Etat est de payer des intérêts. La raréfaction progressive des prêteurs potentiels provoquerait cette hausse et restreindrait la possibilité pour les Etats d’emprunter. Cependant, chaque économie moderne est dotée d’une banque centrale agissant en prêteur en dernier ressort. Résultat, les banques achètent sans problème et donc sans limite une dette dont elles peuvent se défaire en la lui revendant. Taux d’intérêt effectif et montant de dette détenue par les acteurs privés dépendent in fine de l’action de la banque centrale. Le statut de la Réserve fédérale américaine est d’ailleurs explicite dans la définition de sa mission:

« Maintenir en moyenne une croissance des agrégats monétaires et de la quantité de crédit compatible avec le potentiel de croissance de la production, de manière à tendre vers les objectifs suivants : un taux d’emploi maximum ; des prix stables ; des taux d’intérêt à long terme peu élevés ».

Bien qu’indépendantes, les banques centrales maintiennent désormais des taux très bas dans le but assumé d’alléger la charge d’intérêt des Etats. En outre, comme la banque centrale reverse à l’Etat les intérêts qu’il lui a versés sur sa dette, la part de la dette publique que celle-ci détient est gratuite, ce qui abaisse systématiquement le taux d’intérêt moyen payé par l’Etat. Le cas du Japon est à ce sujet illustratif. Selon l’OCDE, son ratio dette publique/Pib était de 226% en 2019. Et le gouvernement nippon envisage sereinement qu’il puisse atteindre 600% en 2060. Son insouciance tient à ce que, grâce à une politique monétaire ultra-accommodante et à une détention de 40% de la dette publique par la Banque centrale, la charge nette d’intérêt a été ramenée à presque zéro en 2019.

Enfin, la quatrième est qu’il y aurait un partage à faire entre une bonne dette et une mauvaise dette.

La bonne dette publique financerait les investissements et la mauvaise le fonctionnement. Ce partage n’a aucun sens car il repose sur un tropisme consistant à appliquer à la dette publique le raisonnement concernant la dette privée. Il suppose que les dépenses publiques d’investissement préparent l’avenir tandis que celles de fonctionnement le sacrifient au présent. Mais il est facile de voir que le salaire d’un chercheur, dont les travaux vont déboucher sur du progrès technique et donc sur davantage de croissance, est du fonctionnement, alors que la construction d’une route ne menant nulle part est un investissement…

Néanmoins, l’idée d’une bonne et d’une mauvaise dette doit être précisée car, sous certaines conditions, c’est elle qui doit guider la politique budgétaire. Nos ancêtres avaient d’ailleurs identifié le problème.

Pendant longtemps, les autorités religieuses ont considéré que la rémunération d’un prêt était usuraire.

Leur raisonnement s’est affiné avec le temps, si bien qu’au XIIIe siècle, Saint Thomas d’Aquin pouvait écrire :

« Celui qui prête de l’argent transfère la propriété de son argent à l’emprunteur ; par conséquent celui qui emprunte possède la somme à ses risques et périls et il est tenu de la rendre intégralement. Le prêteur ne doit donc pas exiger davantage. Mais celui qui prête son argent à un marchand ou à un artisan avec lequel il s’est associé, ne lui transmet pas la propriété de la somme, il en reste toujours le propriétaire, de telle sorte que c’est à ses risques et périls que le marchand commerce sur son argent ou que l’artisan travaille. C’est pourquoi il peut licitement recevoir une partie du gain »

L’économie politique naissante a dès lors distingué deux types de prêts : d’une part, les prêts « commerciaux », encore appelés « prêts de production », qui financent des investissements et l’émergence d’une richesse future fournissant de quoi verser des intérêts ; d’autre part, les prêts destinés à secourir les gens en difficulté, appelés « prêts de consommation », qui relèvent d’une logique de don et doivent être gratuits.

La concrétisation moderne des réflexions de Saint Thomas d’Aquin conduit à affirmer que la dette privée trouve sa justification dans le financement de l’investissement apportant une amélioration structurelle de la croissance tandis que la dette publique trouve la sienne en tant que réponse aux aléas conjoncturels, assurant la solidarité collective avec les secteurs économiques mis en difficulté par les fluctuations cycliques.

C’est sur ces principes que reposent les traités européens, notamment le « Traité sur la stabilité, la coordination et la gouvernance ».

CELUI-CI STIPULE :

« La situation budgétaire des administrations publiques d’une partie contractante est en équilibre ou en excédent ; la règle énoncée est considérée comme respectée si le solde structurel annuel des administrations publiques correspond à (…) une limite inférieure de déficit structurel de 0,5 % du produit intérieur brut aux prix du marché. »

Il entérine le distinguo entre un « bon déficit » – le déficit conjoncturel, qui apparaît quand la croissance s’essouffle et qui s’efface quand elle est soutenue – et un « mauvais déficit » -le déficit structurel, qui est indépendant du cycle et perdure quelles que soient les circonstances.

Ce qui est inquiétant aujourd’hui, c’est que nous nous écartons de ce schéma, ce qui n’est pas sans conséquences négatives.

La première tient à l’égalité entre l’offre et la demande. Toute dépense publique non financée par un prélèvement sur la dépense privée augmente la demande. Si cette augmentation se pérennise, elle entraîne soit un apport d’offre extérieure, c’est-à-dire un creusement du déficit commercial, soit une possibilité offerte au système productif d’augmenter ses prix, c’est-à-dire une relance de l’inflation.

La deuxième tient à ce que l’augmentation de la dette publique provoque des anticipations négatives chez les acteurs privés.

Dans un premier temps, le réflexe d’épargne pour affronter un avenir fiscal rendu incertain par l’accumulation de dette conduit à une augmentation du prix des actifs dont les bulles immobilières sont les traductions les plus manifestes. C’est ce que les économistes appellent l’« équivalence ricardienne ».

Dans un second temps, ces anticipations négatives érodent la crédibilité de la monnaie.

Les pays qui, comme le Liban, ont vu leur devise disparaître au profit du dollar du fait de l’emballement de l’endettement public sont rares. Néanmoins, nous assistons à un retour en force de l’or, qui demeure dans l’inconscient collectif l’ultime recours monétaire, retour en force que souligne l’envolée des cours de ce métal précieux.

Tout ceci pour conclure qu’il est temps de mettre un terme au « quoi qu’il en coûte » même si une cessation de paiement de l’Etat n’est pas à l’ordre du jour.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #2 – Côté culturel

Sortie de crise : dans quoi entrons-nous ?

Sophie Chassat
Philosophe, Associée chez Wemean

La métaphore est médicale : une crise est le moment « critique » où tout peut basculer dans un sens ou dans l’autre. Celui, vital, du rétablissement ou celui, fatal, de la mort. Il semblerait pourtant que les choses ne soient pas aussi nettes et que, pour reprendre la formule de Gramsci, la crise prenne plutôt la forme d’un « interrègne », « consist[ant] justement dans le fait que l’ancien meurt et que le nouveau ne peut pas naître »1. De quoi tout cela va-t-il accoucher ? Suspense… Originellement, « sortir » signifie d’ailleurs « tirer au sort ».

Car c’est bien ce que nous ressentons actuellement : un entre-deux pas très confortable et dont on ne sait où il nous mènera. Le monde d’après qui ne vient pas, le monde d’avant qui ne revient pas, même si, comme les personnages de La Peste de Camus nous reprenons apparemment, à peine l’orage passé, nos habitudes d’antan en toute insouciance, voire inconscience2. Pourtant, nous savons bien en même temps que quelque chose a changé, que cette crise a été au sens fort une « expérience », terme dont l’étymologie signifie « hors du péril » (latin ex-periri). Sortir d’une crise, c’est en effet toujours s’en sortir et en retirer un bénéfice en termes d’apprentissage. L’épreuve nous voit forcément transformés.

Mais qu’est-ce que serait une « bonne » sortie de crise ? Une sortie de crise qui soit une sortie par le haut et pas une sortie de route ? Pour le philosophe Georges Canguilhem, « la mesure de la santé c’est une certaine capacité à surmonter des crises organiques pour instaurer un nouvel ordre physiologique, différent de l’ancien.
Sans intention de plaisanterie, la santé c’est le luxe de pouvoir tomber malade et de s’en relever. »3

Surmonter une crise, c’est inventer une nouvelle norme de vie pour s’adapter à une situation inédite. La santé, c’est l’aptitude à créer des « allures de vie » neuves, alors que la maladie se constate à l’incapacité d’innover. Aussi faut-il se méfier de toutes les sémantiques qui suggèrent un retour au même ou le simple dénouement d’un état : « recommencer », « repartir », « s’y remettre », « déconfiner ».

Inventer, créer, voilà ce qui nous sortira réellement et vitalement de la crise. Comme le disait dès le premier confinement un autre philosophe, Bruno Latour, « si on ne profite pas de cette situation incroyable pour changer, c’est gâcher une crise. »4 C’est pourquoi il nous faut aussi envisager cette sortie de crise comme l’occasion de sortir de nos bulles mentales et de nos préjugés. Sans jamais oublier la question du sens de nos décisions : pourquoi voulons-nous changer ? Dans quelle nouvelle ère voulons-nous « entrer », sachant que d’autres crises nous attendent ? Plus le brouillard est intense, plus nos phares doivent être puissants et porter loin.

____________

1 « La crise consiste justement dans le fait que l’ancien meurt et que le nouveau ne peut pas naître : pendant cet interrègne on observe les phénomènes morbides les plus variés. » Antonio Gramsci, Cahiers de prison (rédigés entre 1929 et 1935).

2 « Pour le moment, il voulait faire comme tous ceux qui avaient l’air de croire, autour de lui, que la peste pouvait venir et repartir sans que le coeur des hommes en soit changé. » Albert Camus, La Peste (1947).

3 Georges Canguilhem, « Le Normal et le Pathologique », in. La Connaissance de la vie (1966). « Ce qui caractérise la santé c’est la possibilité de tolérer des infractions à la norme habituelle et d’instituer des normes nouvelles dans des situations nouvelles. »

4 « Le Grand Entretien », France Inter, 3 avril 2020.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #2 – Zoom sectoriel

La filière aéronautique au pied du mur du climat

Philippe Delmas
Senior Advisor – Aerospace & Defence,
Accuracy

Christophe Leclerc
Associé,
Accuracy

Jean-François Partiot
Associé,
Accuracy

Le transport aérien est en tête de liste des secteurs les plus touchés par la crise du Covid. Derrière lui, souffre toute la filière aéronautique, des constructeurs aux équipementiers de toutes tailles. Le choc est d’autant plus violent que la croissance annuelle était de 5% en moyenne lissée sur les 40 dernières années et était encore prévue à plus de 4% par an pour les décennies à venir*.

En 2020, le trafic aura baissé de 66% par rapport à 2019** tandis que le timing et le niveau de sa reprise sont incertains. Sur les vols intérieurs des grands pays, la reprise dépendra de la rapidité et de l’efficacité des vaccinations. Elle est déjà vigoureuse aux Etats-Unis (trafic revenu à -31% en mars 2021 par rapport à mars 2019) et en Chine (+ 11%) alors qu’elle reste anémique dans l’Union européenne (- 63%). Sur les vols internationaux, la reprise dépendra des reconfinements liés à l’émergence de variants, du rythme de vaccination de chaque pays mais également de la confiance que ces derniers s’accorderont les uns les autres. Elle est aujourd’hui très faible. Au total, 2021 connaîtra un niveau de trafic encore très dégradé. Fin avril 2021, l’IATA prévoyait un trafic aérien mondial à 43% de son niveau de 2019, (contre 51% prévu en décembre). Globalement, le retour au niveau d’activité de 2019 devra sans doute attendre la mi-2022 pour les vols intérieurs et 2023, voire 2024, pour les vols long-courriers. Seul le fret a connu une croissance soutenue mais il représente moins de 10% du trafic.

Plusieurs facteurs laissent penser que le trafic aérien n’est pas prêt de retrouver une croissance durable comparable à celle des décennies précédant la crise, (5% par an de 1980 à 2019).
Plusieurs arguments viennent soutenir cette vision :

– Les préoccupations écologiques des passagers deviennent primordiales et une partie d’entre eux sera plus vigilante à voyager moins et moins loin ;

– Les grands groupes ont traversé la crise du covid en stoppant net tous les voyages d’affaires : courts, moyens et longs courriers.

L’apprentissage a été brusque et subit mais les conclusions sont radicales et très favorables à la stricte limitation de ces voyages, qui permet des économies importantes et l’amélioration du bilan climatique, qui est de plus en plus suivi par les marchés. Selon les dirigeants de grands groupes européens interrogés fin 2020, les voyages d’affaires pourraient durablement baisser de 25% à 40% par rapport à 2019***.

– Déjà suffisants pour justifier une baisse significative du trafic, ces deux facteurs seront complétés par un troisième, corollaire immédiat du modèle économique des compagnies aériennes. Les classes premières et affaires sont le levier majeur de rentabilité d’un vol long-courrier.

Si leurs volumes venaient à être amputés de 25% à 40%, les compagnies n’auront pas d’autre solution que d’augmenter significativement les prix moyens pour toutes les classes
de passagers.

L’impact de la modification des comportements sur les prix devrait entraîner un nouvel équilibre économique : une baisse des volumes de classe affaires de 30% pourrait entraîner une augmentation moyenne du prix des places (affaires et loisirs) de 15%. Avec un coefficient d’élasticité prix/volume de 0,9*, une baisse moyenne du trafic loisirs de 13,5% serait alors à prévoir.

En ordres de grandeur les prévisions de trafic aérien passager pourraient alors être les suivantes :

– Baisse du trafic en classe affaires et first de 30% ;
– Baisse du trafic en classe éco de 13,5% ;
– Augmentation des prix moyens de vente de 15%.

Selon nous, ce trou d’air inattendu et subit constitue une occasion unique pour la filière de se restructurer. Elle y est contrainte par une situation financière intenable. Le transport aérien a levé plus de 250 milliards de dollars de dettes depuis le début de la pandémie et son niveau d’endettement net total devrait dépasser son chiffre d’affaires courant fin 2021 début 2022. Aujourd’hui, le secteur perd encore des dizaines de milliards de dollars de cash chaque trimestre participant à la poursuite de son endettement. (Source IATA)

L’industrie va nécessairement devoir réviser son modèle en profondeur, d’autant plus que cette contrainte économique se double d’une contrainte climatique tout aussi violente. Le transport aérien est en effet un émetteur important de CO2, à hauteur de 2,5% du niveau mondial et de l’ordre de 4% dans l’Union européenne. Il subit en outre une contrainte qui lui est spécifique, à savoir que le CO2 n’est qu’une fraction de son impact climatique global. Les travaux les plus récents ( juillet 2020) confirment que ses émissions de monoxyde d’azote en haute altitude (NOx) contribuent davantage au réchauffement climatique global que celle de CO2.

Au total, le transport aérien représenterait à lui seul 5 à 6% de l’impact climatique de l’humanité.

Ce n’est pas faute d’effort. Les émissions de CO2 par km. passager ont baissé de 56% depuis 1990, ce qui est l’une des meilleures performances de toutes les industries. Le tonnage total de CO2 émis a néanmoins doublé sur cette même période en raison de la croissance du trafic. Ryanair, le leader européen du low cost, résume l’impasse climatique du transport aérien: ses avions sont très récents, leur remplissage maximum (taux moyen 95%) mais elle est l’entreprise la plus émettrice de CO2 d’Europe après 9 opérateurs de centrales électriques à charbon.

Le progrès technique se poursuivra mais, pour les avions tels que nous les connaissons, il ne s’accélèrera pas non plus. Quant aux technologies vraiment nouvelles (hydrogène, électricité), elles viendront sans doute, mais trop tard pour jouer un rôle impor tant dans la tenue des objectifs du GIEC en 2050, c’est à dire limiter le réchauffement climatique à 1,5°C et des émissions nettes de carbone à zéro.

Dans ce contexte, la filière doit se repenser en tenant compte des faits suivants :

– La croissance du trafic restera durablement inférieure à celles des décennies précédentes ;
– Les progrès d’efficacité énergétiques se poursuivront mais ne s’accélèreront pas ;
– Ils devront être complétés par des solutions climatiques crédibles (et donc pas de la compensation) et rapides, comme les carburants propres. Boeing et Airbus viennent d’annoncer, au printemps 2021, leur volonté d’accélérer vite et fort sur l’usage du kérosène vert. Ces derniers ne viendront néanmoins pas en volumes suffisants pour répondre aux objectifs du GIEC ;
– Le sérieux problème, aujourd’hui laissé de côté, des émissions en haute altitude va devoir être traité ;
– Par la suite, et compte tenu du coût des solutions de décarbonation, le coût du transport aérien va fatalement augmenter significativement;
– Cette hausse pèsera sur le trafic le plus sensible au prix, le tourisme, tandis que la Tech réduira nettement et durablement le trafic « haute contribution » ;
– Combinés avec une situation d’endettement préoccupante, ces facteurs vont imposer une révision profonde du modèle économique du transport aérien.

Malgré ce diagnostic sévère, nous pensons qu’il existe des moyens pour l’industrie de réagir de manière radicale et constructive. Nous vous proposerons des pistes prochainement.

____________

Sources : *Boeing et Airbus / * IATA
***interviews Accuracy de dirigeants de grands groupes.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #2 – Histoires de start-up

Delfox

Romain Proglio
Associé, Accuracy

Fondée en 2018 à Bordeaux, Delfox est une plateforme d’Intelligence Artificielle par apprentissage à renforcement, permettant de modéliser des systèmes capables d’évoluer intelligemment et de manière autonome et intuitive dans un environnement en évolution constante, sans intervention humaine ni programmation préalable.

La technologie développée par Delfox consiste ainsi à donner des objectifs à l’IA, qui doit ensuite trouver un moyen d’atteindre de les atteindre. En effet, lorsqu’il s’agit d’IA, il faut comprendre que cette intelligence repose avant tout sur de l’apprentissage.

Ce sont donc ces mécanismes d’apprentissage qui sont au coeur du développement de Delfox, qui s’est développé de manière significative depuis plus de deux ans sur des compétences de pointe comme le Deep Learning, le Reinforcement Learning et les algorithmes avancés connexes.

Il s’agit d’apprendre à une machine à réagir de manière autonome, donc sans lui indiquer comment faire face à une problématique. La machine proposera elle-même des solutions, qui amèneront des récompenses ou des pénalités, et apprendra ainsi de ses erreurs.

Pour apprendre par exemple à un drone à aller d’un point A à un point B, il ne s’agit donc pas de lui indiquer s’il doit éviter des collisions ou accélérer à certains points du trajet, mais plutôt de lui laisser la capacité de réagir lui-même et de le récompenser ou le pénaliser en fonction des solutions proposées. Les applications sont particulièrement larges, en premier lieu dans le domaine des satellites, dans lequel Delfox épaule ArianeGroup dans la surveillance de l’espace. Delfox participe ainsi à détecter les trajectoires de satellites à partir de données provenant du réseau de surveillance de l’espace GEOTracker pour éviter les collisions et les interférences.

Mais le champ d’application est bien plus vaste : drones autonomes militaires et urbains, automobiles, logistique, Défense, Naval, etc. L’autonomie sera sans aucun doute un segment d’activité clef de la prochaine décennie. Delfox est déjà une des plus belles réussites dans le domaine. Avec 15 collaborateurs, Delfox a un objectif d’atteindre 1m€ de chiffre d’affaires en 2021, et possède déjà des références comme ArianeGroup, Dassault Aviation, Thales ou la DGA.

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Accuracy Talks Straight #2 (FR)

Pour notre deuxième édition de Accuracy Talks Straight, Nicolas Barsalou nous livre son point de vue sur la sortie de crise, avant de laisser Romain Proglio nous présenter Delfox, une start-up spécialisée en intelligence artificielle. Nous analyserons ensuite l’impact de la crise dans le secteur aéronautique avec Philippe Delmas, Senior Aerospace & Defence advisor, Christophe Leclerc et Jean-François Partiot.
Sophie Chassat, Philosophe et associée chez Wemean, nous proposera d’explorer la sortie de crise – côté culturel. Enfin, nous nous focaliserons sur la dette publique avec Jean-Marc Daniel, économiste, professeur émérite à l’ESCP, ainsi que sur le risque inflationniste avec Hervé Goulletquer, Senior Economic Advisor.


SOMMAIRE


Édito

Nicolas Barsalou
Associé, Accuracy

LA CRISE ET CE QUI S’ENSUIVIT*

La crise que nous traversons depuis bientôt un an et demi n’a pas d’équivalent dans l’histoire moderne. Ce n’est ni une crise cyclique classique, ni même une réplique de la grande crise financière de 2008. Il serait donc dangereux de penser que nous en sortirons de la même manière que les crises précédentes.

Que constatons-nous ? Deux mots permettent d’approfondir l’analyse.

Le premier est « contraste ». Ce n’est certes pas la première fois qu’une crise économique affecte plus sévèrement certaines zones géographiques, et notamment dans le cas présent l’Europe plus que l’Extrême-Orient. En revanche, c’est la première fois que nous observons une telle diversité en matière d’impact sur les différents secteurs économiques. Ainsi certains secteurs sinistrés mettront au mieux plusieurs années à retrouver la situation de 2019, comme le transport aérien ou le tourisme. A contrario, d’autres secteurs ont tiré parti de la crise, comme les activités en ligne (e-commerce, vidéo, jeux) ou ont pu servir de valeur refuge, comme le luxe.

Le deuxième mot est sans doute « incertitude ». Compte tenu d’un contexte géopolitique tendu et des injections sans précédent de capitaux dans l’économie, l’embellie actuelle pourrait déboucher à relativement court terme sur une autre crise de nature plus classique, d’autant plus sérieuse que toutes les plaies récentes n’auront pas cicatrisé.

En tant que conseils de nombreux acteurs de la vie économique partout dans le monde, nous observons une dé-corrélation inédite entre certaines situations de marché et l’état général de l’économie. D’une part, le marché des fusions-acquisitions, dopé par une abondance sans précédent de liquidités, a rarement sinon jamais connu une telle exubérance en volume comme en prix, et ce bien avant la sortie de crise. D’autre part, le marché des restructurations des entreprises est lui aussi et simultanément très actif, porté en particulier par les renégociations bancaires dans certains secteurs en difficulté. Ce paradoxe n’est qu’apparent : compte tenu des éléments rappelés ci-dessus il est possible et donc naturel d’observer ces deux tendances à la fois.

Dans ce contexte, il convient à notre avis plus que jamais pour tous les acteurs de la vie économique et financière d’éviter les comportements moutonniers et d’analyser chaque cas de manière individualisée et sur-mesure.

Le cas le plus intéressant est sans doute celui de secteurs qui sont traversés à la fois par ces deux courants positif et négatif. Le secteur de l’immobilier est particulièrement pertinent car il est traversé par des mutations profondes et durables, auxquelles s’ajoutent les effets de la dernière crise. Examinons à ce ti t re deux sous-secteurs représentatifs : l’immobilier commercial et l’immobilier de bureaux.

Le premier est affecté depuis longtemps maintenant par le développement for t et pérenne du e-commerce, phénomène qui s’est accéléré en 2020 sous l’effet du confinement et de la fermeture de nombreux centres commerciaux, à tel point que les valeurs des foncières commerciales étaient en fin d’année dernière à un plus bas historique. Notre conviction arrêtée depuis longtemps déjà est que cette baisse des valeurs était excessive et caractéristique de ces mouvements moutonniers déjà mentionnés et non adaptés à l’économie moderne : les centres bien placés, bien gérés et bien aménagés continueront à être des acteurs majeurs du commerce. Il est heureux que, depuis quelques semaines, certains commencent à s’en rendre compte et que les valeurs remontent.

Le deuxième bénéficiait jusqu’à la crise de 2020 d’une conjoncture favorable, en raison d’une inadaptation structurelle de l’offre à la demande et d’une situation de taux d’intérêt réels nuls qui tirait à la hausse les valeurs dites « refuges » comme l’immobilier.

De surcroît, la crise a eu jusqu’ici peu d’impact car, pour l’essentiel, les loyers ont continué à être payés et, compte tenu d’une politique monétaire extrêmement accommodante, les taux de capitalisation et donc les valeurs ont peu évolué. Or, ces deux paramètres sont aujourd’hui menacés. L’essor du télétravail, s’il s’avère pérenne et significatif (au-delà sans doute d’un ou deux jours par semaine), aura inévitablement des conséquences importantes sur la quantité de mètres carrés nécessaires, sur l’aménagement des locaux et sur leur emplacement. Tous ces impacts ne seront pas forcément négatifs : s’il est certain que les grands centres d’affaires comme La Défense ou Canary Wharf souffrent et vont souffrir, les quartiers centraux des affaires pourraient voir leurs valeurs et taux d’occupation continuer à croître.

Quant aux paramètres macro-économiques, et notamment l’inflation, seul un oracle pourrait prédire leur évolution : la seule chose à faire est de rester vigilant et de se donner les moyens d’être anti-fragile grâce à des stratégies privilégiant la flexibilité et l’agilité. À cet égard, il sera extrêmement pertinent de surveiller l’évolution du secteur bancaire, mais ceci sera l’objet d’une autre chronique…

* « LES MYRTES ONT DES FLEURS QUI PARLENT DES ÉTOILES ET C’EST DE MES DOULEURS QU’EST FAIT LE JOUR QUI VIENT PLUS PROFONDE EST LA MER ET PLUS BLANCHE EST LA VOILE ET PLUS LE MAL AMER PLUS MERVEILLEUX LE BIEN »

LOUIS ARAGON
« LA GUERRE ET CE QUI S’ENSUIVIT » (LE ROMAN INACHEVÉ)


Delfox

Romain Proglio
Associé, Accuracy

Fondée en 2018 à Bordeaux, Delfox est une plateforme d’Intelligence Artificielle par apprentissage à renforcement, permettant de modéliser des systèmes capables d’évoluer intelligemment et de manière autonome et intuitive dans un environnement en évolution constante, sans intervention humaine ni programmation préalable.

La technologie développée par Delfox consiste ainsi à donner des objectifs à l’IA, qui doit ensuite trouver un moyen d’atteindre de les atteindre. En effet, lorsqu’il s’agit d’IA, il faut comprendre que cette intelligence repose avant tout sur de l’apprentissage.

Ce sont donc ces mécanismes d’apprentissage qui sont au coeur du développement de Delfox, qui s’est développé de manière significative depuis plus de deux ans sur des compétences de pointe comme le Deep Learning, le Reinforcement Learning et les algorithmes avancés connexes.

Il s’agit d’apprendre à une machine à réagir de manière autonome, donc sans lui indiquer comment faire face à une problématique. La machine proposera elle-même des solutions, qui amèneront des récompenses ou des pénalités, et apprendra ainsi de ses erreurs.

Pour apprendre par exemple à un drone à aller d’un point A à un point B, il ne s’agit donc pas de lui indiquer s’il doit éviter des collisions ou accélérer à certains points du trajet, mais plutôt de lui laisser la capacité de réagir lui-même et de le récompenser ou le pénaliser en fonction des solutions proposées. Les applications sont particulièrement larges, en premier lieu dans le domaine des satellites, dans lequel Delfox épaule ArianeGroup dans la surveillance de l’espace. Delfox participe ainsi à détecter les trajectoires de satellites à partir de données provenant du réseau de surveillance de l’espace GEOTracker pour éviter les collisions et les interférences.

Mais le champ d’application est bien plus vaste : drones autonomes militaires et urbains, automobiles, logistique, Défense, Naval, etc. L’autonomie sera sans aucun doute un segment d’activité clef de la prochaine décennie. Delfox est déjà une des plus belles réussites dans le domaine. Avec 15 collaborateurs, Delfox a un objectif d’atteindre 1m€ de chiffre d’affaires en 2021, et possède déjà des références comme ArianeGroup, Dassault Aviation, Thales ou la DGA.


La filière aéronautique au pied du mur du climat

Philippe Delmas
Senior Advisor – Aerospace & Defence,
Accuracy

Christophe Leclerc
Associé,
Accuracy

Jean-François Partiot
Associé,
Accuracy

Le transport aérien est en tête de liste des secteurs les plus touchés par la crise du Covid. Derrière lui, souffre toute la filière aéronautique, des constructeurs aux équipementiers de toutes tailles. Le choc est d’autant plus violent que la croissance annuelle était de 5% en moyenne lissée sur les 40 dernières années et était encore prévue à plus de 4% par an pour les décennies à venir*.

En 2020, le trafic aura baissé de 66% par rapport à 2019** tandis que le timing et le niveau de sa reprise sont incertains. Sur les vols intérieurs des grands pays, la reprise dépendra de la rapidité et de l’efficacité des vaccinations. Elle est déjà vigoureuse aux Etats-Unis (trafic revenu à -31% en mars 2021 par rapport à mars 2019) et en Chine (+ 11%) alors qu’elle reste anémique dans l’Union européenne (- 63%). Sur les vols internationaux, la reprise dépendra des reconfinements liés à l’émergence de variants, du rythme de vaccination de chaque pays mais également de la confiance que ces derniers s’accorderont les uns les autres. Elle est aujourd’hui très faible. Au total, 2021 connaîtra un niveau de trafic encore très dégradé. Fin avril 2021, l’IATA prévoyait un trafic aérien mondial à 43% de son niveau de 2019, (contre 51% prévu en décembre). Globalement, le retour au niveau d’activité de 2019 devra sans doute attendre la mi-2022 pour les vols intérieurs et 2023, voire 2024, pour les vols long-courriers. Seul le fret a connu une croissance soutenue mais il représente moins de 10% du trafic.

Plusieurs facteurs laissent penser que le trafic aérien n’est pas prêt de retrouver une croissance durable comparable à celle des décennies précédant la crise, (5% par an de 1980 à 2019).
Plusieurs arguments viennent soutenir cette vision :

– Les préoccupations écologiques des passagers deviennent primordiales et une partie d’entre eux sera plus vigilante à voyager moins et moins loin ;

– Les grands groupes ont traversé la crise du covid en stoppant net tous les voyages d’affaires : courts, moyens et longs courriers.

L’apprentissage a été brusque et subit mais les conclusions sont radicales et très favorables à la stricte limitation de ces voyages, qui permet des économies importantes et l’amélioration du bilan climatique, qui est de plus en plus suivi par les marchés. Selon les dirigeants de grands groupes européens interrogés fin 2020, les voyages d’affaires pourraient durablement baisser de 25% à 40% par rapport à 2019***.

– Déjà suffisants pour justifier une baisse significative du trafic, ces deux facteurs seront complétés par un troisième, corollaire immédiat du modèle économique des compagnies aériennes. Les classes premières et affaires sont le levier majeur de rentabilité d’un vol long-courrier.

Si leurs volumes venaient à être amputés de 25% à 40%, les compagnies n’auront pas d’autre solution que d’augmenter significativement les prix moyens pour toutes les classes
de passagers.

L’impact de la modification des comportements sur les prix devrait entraîner un nouvel équilibre économique : une baisse des volumes de classe affaires de 30% pourrait entraîner une augmentation moyenne du prix des places (affaires et loisirs) de 15%. Avec un coefficient d’élasticité prix/volume de 0,9*, une baisse moyenne du trafic loisirs de 13,5% serait alors à prévoir.

En ordres de grandeur les prévisions de trafic aérien passager pourraient alors être les suivantes :

– Baisse du trafic en classe affaires et first de 30% ;
– Baisse du trafic en classe éco de 13,5% ;
– Augmentation des prix moyens de vente de 15%.

Selon nous, ce trou d’air inattendu et subit constitue une occasion unique pour la filière de se restructurer. Elle y est contrainte par une situation financière intenable. Le transport aérien a levé plus de 250 milliards de dollars de dettes depuis le début de la pandémie et son niveau d’endettement net total devrait dépasser son chiffre d’affaires courant fin 2021 début 2022. Aujourd’hui, le secteur perd encore des dizaines de milliards de dollars de cash chaque trimestre participant à la poursuite de son endettement. (Source IATA)

L’industrie va nécessairement devoir réviser son modèle en profondeur, d’autant plus que cette contrainte économique se double d’une contrainte climatique tout aussi violente. Le transport aérien est en effet un émetteur important de CO2, à hauteur de 2,5% du niveau mondial et de l’ordre de 4% dans l’Union européenne. Il subit en outre une contrainte qui lui est spécifique, à savoir que le CO2 n’est qu’une fraction de son impact climatique global. Les travaux les plus récents ( juillet 2020) confirment que ses émissions de monoxyde d’azote en haute altitude (NOx) contribuent davantage au réchauffement climatique global que celle de CO2.

Au total, le transport aérien représenterait à lui seul 5 à 6% de l’impact climatique de l’humanité.

Ce n’est pas faute d’effort. Les émissions de CO2 par km. passager ont baissé de 56% depuis 1990, ce qui est l’une des meilleures performances de toutes les industries. Le tonnage total de CO2 émis a néanmoins doublé sur cette même période en raison de la croissance du trafic. Ryanair, le leader européen du low cost, résume l’impasse climatique du transport aérien: ses avions sont très récents, leur remplissage maximum (taux moyen 95%) mais elle est l’entreprise la plus émettrice de CO2 d’Europe après 9 opérateurs de centrales électriques à charbon.

Le progrès technique se poursuivra mais, pour les avions tels que nous les connaissons, il ne s’accélèrera pas non plus. Quant aux technologies vraiment nouvelles (hydrogène, électricité), elles viendront sans doute, mais trop tard pour jouer un rôle impor tant dans la tenue des objectifs du GIEC en 2050, c’est à dire limiter le réchauffement climatique à 1,5°C et des émissions nettes de carbone à zéro.

Dans ce contexte, la filière doit se repenser en tenant compte des faits suivants :

– La croissance du trafic restera durablement inférieure à celles des décennies précédentes ;
– Les progrès d’efficacité énergétiques se poursuivront mais ne s’accélèreront pas ;
– Ils devront être complétés par des solutions climatiques crédibles (et donc pas de la compensation) et rapides, comme les carburants propres. Boeing et Airbus viennent d’annoncer, au printemps 2021, leur volonté d’accélérer vite et fort sur l’usage du kérosène vert. Ces derniers ne viendront néanmoins pas en volumes suffisants pour répondre aux objectifs du GIEC ;
– Le sérieux problème, aujourd’hui laissé de côté, des émissions en haute altitude va devoir être traité ;
– Par la suite, et compte tenu du coût des solutions de décarbonation, le coût du transport aérien va fatalement augmenter significativement ;
– Cette hausse pèsera sur le trafic le plus sensible au prix, le tourisme, tandis que la Tech réduira nettement et durablement le trafic « haute contribution » ;
– Combinés avec une situation d’endettement préoccupante, ces facteurs vont imposer une révision profonde du modèle économique du transport aérien.

Malgré ce diagnostic sévère, nous pensons qu’il existe des moyens pour l’industrie de réagir de manière radicale et constructive. Nous vous proposerons des pistes prochainement.

____________

Sources : *Boeing et Airbus / * IATA
***interviews Accuracy de dirigeants de grands groupes.


Sortie de crise : dans quoi entrons-nous ?

Sophie Chassat
Philosophe, Associée chez Wemean

La métaphore est médicale : une crise est le moment « critique » où tout peut basculer dans un sens ou dans l’autre. Celui, vital, du rétablissement ou celui, fatal, de la mort. Il semblerait pourtant que les choses ne soient pas aussi nettes et que, pour reprendre la formule de Gramsci, la crise prenne plutôt la forme d’un « interrègne », « consist[ant] justement dans le fait que l’ancien meurt et que le nouveau ne peut pas naître »1. De quoi tout cela va-t-il accoucher ? Suspense… Originellement, « sortir » signifie d’ailleurs « tirer au sort ».

Car c’est bien ce que nous ressentons actuellement : un entre-deux pas très confortable et dont on ne sait où il nous mènera. Le monde d’après qui ne vient pas, le monde d’avant qui ne revient pas, même si, comme les personnages de La Peste de Camus nous reprenons apparemment, à peine l’orage passé, nos habitudes d’antan en toute insouciance, voire inconscience2. Pourtant, nous savons bien en même temps que quelque chose a changé, que cette crise a été au sens fort une « expérience », terme dont l’étymologie signifie « hors du péril » (latin ex-periri). Sortir d’une crise, c’est en effet toujours s’en sortir et en retirer un bénéfice en termes d’apprentissage. L’épreuve nous voit forcément transformés.

Mais qu’est-ce que serait une « bonne » sortie de crise ? Une sortie de crise qui soit une sortie par le haut et pas une sortie de route ? Pour le philosophe Georges Canguilhem, « la mesure de la santé c’est une certaine capacité à surmonter des crises organiques pour instaurer un nouvel ordre physiologique, différent de l’ancien.
Sans intention de plaisanterie, la santé c’est le luxe de pouvoir tomber malade et de s’en relever. »3

Surmonter une crise, c’est inventer une nouvelle norme de vie pour s’adapter à une situation inédite. La santé, c’est l’aptitude à créer des « allures de vie » neuves, alors que la maladie se constate à l’incapacité d’innover. Aussi faut-il se méfier de toutes les sémantiques qui suggèrent un retour au même ou le simple dénouement d’un état : « recommencer », « repartir », « s’y remettre », « déconfiner ».

Inventer, créer, voilà ce qui nous sortira réellement et vitalement de la crise. Comme le disait dès le premier confinement un autre philosophe, Bruno Latour, « si on ne profite pas de cette situation incroyable pour changer, c’est gâcher une crise. »4 C’est pourquoi il nous faut aussi envisager cette sortie de crise comme l’occasion de sortir de nos bulles mentales et de nos préjugés. Sans jamais oublier la question du sens de nos décisions : pourquoi voulons-nous changer ? Dans quelle nouvelle ère voulons-nous « entrer », sachant que d’autres crises nous attendent ? Plus le brouillard est intense, plus nos phares doivent être puissants et porter loin.

____________

1 « La crise consiste justement dans le fait que l’ancien meurt et que le nouveau ne peut pas naître : pendant cet interrègne on observe les phénomènes morbides les plus variés. » Antonio Gramsci, Cahiers de prison (rédigés entre 1929 et 1935).

2 « Pour le moment, il voulait faire comme tous ceux qui avaient l’air de croire, autour de lui, que la peste pouvait venir et repartir sans que le coeur des hommes en soit changé. » Albert Camus, La Peste (1947).

3 Georges Canguilhem, « Le Normal et le Pathologique », in. La Connaissance de la vie (1966). « Ce qui caractérise la santé c’est la possibilité de tolérer des infractions à la norme habituelle et d’instituer des normes nouvelles dans des situations nouvelles. »

4 « Le Grand Entretien », France Inter, 3 avril 2020.


Considérations sur la dette publique

Jean-Marc Daniel
Économiste, professeur émérite à l’ESCP

Les politiques de soutien à l’économie liées à la Covid 19, en substituant de la dette au travail, ont fait exploser l’endettement public mondial. D’après le FMI, celui-ci devrait passer de 83% du PIB fin 2019 à 100% fin 2021. A cette date, ce ratio serait de 119% en France, de 158% en Italie et de … 264% au Japon. Or beaucoup des commentaires que suscite cette explosion sont saugrenus.

QUATRE IDÉES FAUSSES SONT SOUVENT VÉHICULÉES À PROPOS DE LA DETTE PUBLIQUE.

La première est qu’elle constitue un fardeau qu’une génération transmet à la génération suivante. Pourtant, dès le XVIIIe siècle, Jean-François Melon a montré le caractère approximatif d’une telle assertion. Ce secrétaire du célèbre John Law au moment où celui-ci mène sa politique de monétisation de la dette publique a cherché à se justifier après l’échec de cette politique. Il a donné sa vision de ce qui s’est passé dans un Essai politique sur le commerce où il énonce :

« PAR LA DETTE PUBLIQUE LE PAYS SE PRÊTE À LUI-MÊME. »

Il insiste sur le fait que la dette publique ne réalise pas un transfert d’une génération à l’autre mais d’un groupe social – les contribuables – vers un autre – les détenteurs de titres publics – qui perçoit les intérêts.

La deuxième est que le remboursement de la dette fait peser une menace sur les finances publiques. Certains proposent donc d’émettre de la dette perpétuelle pour ne pas avoir à la rembourser. Il se trouve qu’en pratique, la dette publique est déjà perpétuelle. En effet, les Etats se contentent de verser les intérêts. Depuis le début du XIXe siècle, aucun crédit n’est inscrit dans leur budget pour le remboursement de leur dette. Chaque fois qu’un emprunt arrive à échéance, il est immédiatement replacé.

La troisième est que c’est une hausse brutale des taux d’intérêt qui constituerait une menace puisque l’engagement concret et formel de l’Etat est de payer des intérêts. La raréfaction progressive des prêteurs potentiels provoquerait cette hausse et restreindrait la possibilité pour les Etats d’emprunter. Cependant, chaque économie moderne est dotée d’une banque centrale agissant en prêteur en dernier ressort. Résultat, les banques achètent sans problème et donc sans limite une dette dont elles peuvent se défaire en la lui revendant. Taux d’intérêt effectif et montant de dette détenue par les acteurs privés dépendent in fine de l’action de la banque centrale. Le statut de la Réserve fédérale américaine est d’ailleurs explicite dans la définition de sa mission:

« Maintenir en moyenne une croissance des agrégats monétaires et de la quantité de crédit compatible avec le potentiel de croissance de la production, de manière à tendre vers les objectifs suivants : un taux d’emploi maximum ; des prix stables ; des taux d’intérêt à long terme peu élevés ».

Bien qu’indépendantes, les banques centrales maintiennent désormais des taux très bas dans le but assumé d’alléger la charge d’intérêt des Etats. En outre, comme la banque centrale reverse à l’Etat les intérêts qu’il lui a versés sur sa dette, la part de la dette publique que celle-ci détient est gratuite, ce qui abaisse systématiquement le taux d’intérêt moyen payé par l’Etat. Le cas du Japon est à ce sujet illustratif. Selon l’OCDE, son ratio dette publique/Pib était de 226% en 2019. Et le gouvernement nippon envisage sereinement qu’il puisse atteindre 600% en 2060. Son insouciance tient à ce que, grâce à une politique monétaire ultra-accommodante et à une détention de 40% de la dette publique par la Banque centrale, la charge nette d’intérêt a été ramenée à presque zéro en 2019.

Enfin, la quatrième est qu’il y aurait un partage à faire entre une bonne dette et une mauvaise dette.

La bonne dette publique financerait les investissements et la mauvaise le fonctionnement. Ce partage n’a aucun sens car il repose sur un tropisme consistant à appliquer à la dette publique le raisonnement concernant la dette privée. Il suppose que les dépenses publiques d’investissement préparent l’avenir tandis que celles de fonctionnement le sacrifient au présent. Mais il est facile de voir que le salaire d’un chercheur, dont les travaux vont déboucher sur du progrès technique et donc sur davantage de croissance, est du fonctionnement, alors que la construction d’une route ne menant nulle part est un investissement…

Néanmoins, l’idée d’une bonne et d’une mauvaise dette doit être précisée car, sous certaines conditions, c’est elle qui doit guider la politique budgétaire. Nos ancêtres avaient d’ailleurs identifié le problème.

Pendant longtemps, les autorités religieuses ont considéré que la rémunération d’un prêt était usuraire.

Leur raisonnement s’est affiné avec le temps, si bien qu’au XIIIe siècle, Saint Thomas d’Aquin pouvait écrire :

« Celui qui prête de l’argent transfère la propriété de son argent à l’emprunteur ; par conséquent celui qui emprunte possède la somme à ses risques et périls et il est tenu de la rendre intégralement. Le prêteur ne doit donc pas exiger davantage. Mais celui qui prête son argent à un marchand ou à un artisan avec lequel il s’est associé, ne lui transmet pas la propriété de la somme, il en reste toujours le propriétaire, de telle sorte que c’est à ses risques et périls que le marchand commerce sur son argent ou que l’artisan travaille. C’est pourquoi il peut licitement recevoir une partie du gain »

L’économie politique naissante a dès lors distingué deux types de prêts : d’une part, les prêts « commerciaux », encore appelés « prêts de production », qui financent des investissements et l’émergence d’une richesse future fournissant de quoi verser des intérêts ; d’autre part, les prêts destinés à secourir les gens en difficulté, appelés « prêts de consommation », qui relèvent d’une logique de don et doivent être gratuits.

La concrétisation moderne des réflexions de Saint Thomas d’Aquin conduit à affirmer que la dette privée trouve sa justification dans le financement de l’investissement apportant une amélioration structurelle de la croissance tandis que la dette publique trouve la sienne en tant que réponse aux aléas conjoncturels, assurant la solidarité collective avec les secteurs économiques mis en difficulté par les fluctuations cycliques.

C’est sur ces principes que reposent les traités européens, notamment le « Traité sur la stabilité, la coordination et la gouvernance ».

CELUI-CI STIPULE :

« La situation budgétaire des administrations publiques d’une partie contractante est en équilibre ou en excédent ; la règle énoncée est considérée comme respectée si le solde structurel annuel des administrations publiques correspond à (…) une limite inférieure de déficit structurel de 0,5 % du produit intérieur brut aux prix du marché. »

Il entérine le distinguo entre un « bon déficit » – le déficit conjoncturel, qui apparaît quand la croissance s’essouffle et qui s’efface quand elle est soutenue – et un « mauvais déficit » -le déficit structurel, qui est indépendant du cycle et perdure quelles que soient les circonstances.

Ce qui est inquiétant aujourd’hui, c’est que nous nous écartons de ce schéma, ce qui n’est pas sans conséquences négatives.

La première tient à l’égalité entre l’offre et la demande. Toute dépense publique non financée par un prélèvement sur la dépense privée augmente la demande. Si cette augmentation se pérennise, elle entraîne soit un apport d’offre extérieure, c’est-à-dire un creusement du déficit commercial, soit une possibilité offerte au système productif d’augmenter ses prix, c’est-à-dire une relance de l’inflation.

La deuxième tient à ce que l’augmentation de la dette publique provoque des anticipations négatives chez les acteurs privés.

Dans un premier temps, le réflexe d’épargne pour affronter un avenir fiscal rendu incertain par l’accumulation de dette conduit à une augmentation du prix des actifs dont les bulles immobilières sont les traductions les plus manifestes. C’est ce que les économistes appellent l’« équivalence ricardienne ».

Dans un second temps, ces anticipations négatives érodent la crédibilité de la monnaie.

Les pays qui, comme le Liban, ont vu leur devise disparaître au profit du dollar du fait de l’emballement de l’endettement public sont rares. Néanmoins, nous assistons à un retour en force de l’or, qui demeure dans l’inconscient collectif l’ultime recours monétaire, retour en force que souligne l’envolée des cours de ce métal précieux.

Tout ceci pour conclure qu’il est temps de mettre un terme au « quoi qu’il en coûte » même si une cessation de paiement de l’Etat n’est pas à l’ordre du jour.


Risque inflationniste : où regarder ?

Hervé Goulletquer
Senior Economic Advisor

Souvenons-nous du temps d’avant la pandémie. Les prix étaient bien sages. De début 2010 à début 2020, la hausse moyenne annuelle des indices de prix à la consommation, dont on exclut les postes particulièrement volatils que sont l’énergie et les produits alimentaires, atteint 1,8% aux Etats-Unis et 1,1% en Zone Euro. L’objectif de 2% des banques centrales n’est pas respecté et même un taux de chômage très bas (en début d’année dernière il était de 3,5% outre-Atlantique et de 5% en Allemagne) parait être impuissant à provoquer une accélération, via des coûts salariaux plus dynamiques.

Les évolutions du marché du travail expliqueraient pour une grande partie ce résultat : la dérèglementation et la baisse du pouvoir de négociation des salariés. Une préférence collective pour l’épargne par rapport à l’investissement et la crédibilité des politiques monétaires sont les autres explications à mettre en avant.

Une crise de la COVID qui dure presqu’un an et demi, une sortie qui se dessine enfin, au moins aux Etats-Unis et en Europe, et voilà que le panorama des prix paraît chamboulé. En deux mois (avril et mai), ce même noyau dur des prix augmente de 1,6% aux Etats-Unis (10% en rythme annuel !) et de 0,7% en Zone Euro (soit plus de 4% en annualisé). Que se passe-t-il ? En sachant que la (mauvaise) surprise est d’autant plus grande que l’objectif de politique économique, tout au long de la pandémie, a été de préserver les capacités productives (entreprises et salariés), de telle sorte que l’activité puisse repartir « comme avant » lorsque les conditions sanitaires le permettraient.

Du côté des prix, les choses ne se passeraient donc peut-être pas comme prévues. Quelles explications peut-on avancer ? Proposons en trois.

D’abord, la réouverture d’une économie peu ou prou « misesous cloche » pendant un temps assez long nécessite un rééquilibrage. Relancer la production n’est pas instantané et la demande liée au confinement est différente de celle de la réouverture. Du côté de l’offre, un indice de matières premières, comme le S1P GSCI, est en hausse de 65% sur un an (et même de 130% par rapport au point bas d’avril 2020). De même, le coût du fret maritime a progressé sur un an de plus de 150%. Du côté de la demande, dans ce moment de passage d’un état de l’économie à l’autre, deux mécanismes de déformation à la hausse des prix cohabitent. Les biens ou les services, qui sont ressortis comme les gagnants du confinement, n’ont pas encore « abdiqué » ; leurs prix restent dynamiques. Ceux, qui ont été les perdants, peuvent désormais « relever la tête » ; ou pour mieux dire les tarifs ! Les deux graphiques* ci-dessous illustrent ce qui se passe aux Etats-Unis.

Fort de ce double constat et à ce stade de l’analyse, une première conclusion se dessine : le phénomène d’accélération des prix serait bien transitoire, comme le répètent les banquiers centraux. Les circuits de production vont retrouver un « régime de croisière » et la concomitance de ces deux mouvements d’emballement de certains prix au détail n’est pas appelée à durer.

Etats-Unis : les prix gagnants du déconfinement (4% de l’indice)

Etats-Unis : les prix gagnants du confinement (12% de l’indice)

Ensuite, il faut rappeler les mécanismes qui sont au coeur de la formation des prix à la consommation. Trois points sont clé en la matière.

1. La perte en ligne entre prix des produits bruts et prix à la consommation est très importante. Tant et si bien que dans le cas américain la corrélation entre les deux séries est de seulement 10%.

2. Le profil des coûts salariaux, et surtout de ceux par unité produite (les premiers dont on soustrait l’évolution de la productivité du travail), façonne, avec un retard d’un petit nombre de trimestres, celui des prix à la consommation. Les messages envoyés par l’amont de cette relation ne sont pas inquiétants. Le taux de chômage n’a pas, et de beaucoup, retrouvé le niveau d’avant l’épisode de la COVID et les entreprises insistent beaucoup sur la nécessité d’améliorer leur efficacité.

3. Les anticipations inflationnistes jouent un grand rôle dans la formation des prix. La stabilité des premières est la garante de celle des seconds. Le raisonnement est le suivant : si tous les consommateurs se mettent à croire que les prix vont accélérer, ils vont ensemble précipiter les décisions d’achat. Le déséquilibre, le plus souvent inévitable, entre une demande subitement plus marquée et une of fre qui a du mal à s’adapter rapidement, enclenche le phénomène d’accélération des prix. Celui-ci s’amplifiera et se pérennisera si les salaires s’ajustent au prix. Il sera alors justifié de parler d’inflation.

Disons que, pour le moment au moins, les anticipations ont plutôt bien résisté au « tintamarre » provoqué par ces quelques hausses un peu for tes des pr ix à la consommation.

Chine : la “perte en ligne” des prix à la production (IPP) au noyau dur des prix à la consommation (IPC)

Etats-Unis : le rôle-clé des coûts salariaux unitaires dans la formation des prix au détail

En conclusion de ce deuxième point analytique, le risque d’une inflation « cyclique » paraît peu présent à l’heure actuelle.

Enfin, malgré le souhait prononcé et la volonté affichée d’un retour à la normale une fois la pandémie mise derrière, ne doit-on pas s’interroger sur les changements induits par celle-ci ? POSONS ALORS TROIS QUESTIONS :

1. Comment éliminer les divergences générées par la crise sanitaire (pays, secteurs, entreprises et ménages (emploi et épargne) ?

2. Quel sera l’effet de la montée de l’endettement (public et privé) ?

3. Comment normaliser une politique économique très sollicitée ?

C’est bien parce que ces doutes sont présents que le volontarisme de politique économique à la fois demeure et se transforme. La meilleure illustration de la démarche est à rechercher outre-Atlantique dans la High Pressure Economy. Celle-ci a une triple ambition : empêcher un déclin de la croissance potentielle, réorienter l’économie vers demain (digital, environnement et éducation/formation) et dynamiser à la fois la demande et l’offre. Il faut à ce titre augmenter la demande publique et augmenter les transferts, dans l’idée que la dépense privée « suivra ». Il faut aussi et en même temps s’assurer que les politiques sectorielles et structurelles participent à la fois de l’offre correspondante, de gains de productivité plus élevés et de davantage d’emplois. Et ceci en évitant de trop importants décalages de calendrier entre les inflexions haussières respectives de la demande et de l’offre. Au risque sinon de créer les
conditions de prix moins sages.

De plus, Il ne faut pas se « cacher derrière son petit doigt ». Il y a une dimension « destruction créatrice » dans la démarche engagée.

TROIS ÉVOLUTIONS COMMENCENT DÉJÀ À APPARAÎTRE.

1. Une remise en cause du triptyque – mouvements (marchandises et personnes) / concentration (lieux de production et éventuellement entreprises) / hyperconsommation – pour cause de contrainte de développement durable.

2. Une recomposition du tissu productif (transport aérien, tourisme, automobile, …).

3. L’adéquation offre et demande de travail avec à la fois des pénuries et des excès de main d’oeuvre.

Il faut l’admettre : on n’est pas face à un déroulé à la fois cyclique et classique. Le réglage de la politique économique peut ne pas être adapté (un stimulus, ou mal calibré ou mal adapté) et les mutations structurelles et sectorielles peuvent générer des déséquilibres au niveau macroéconomique ; l’accélération des prix en serait un révélateur. Bien sûr, à aujourd’hui, tout ceci tient de la conjecture. Mais un devoir de vigilance apparaît.

REPRENONS LES TROIS CONCLUSIONS AUXQUELLES NOUS SOMMES ARRIVÉS :

Le transitoire n’est pas fait pour durer (!) ; les enchainements cycliques n’envoient pas de messages particulièrement inquiétants sur le profil des prix aujourd’hui et dans un avenir proche ; le mix, formé des initiatives de politique économique et des changements structurels en train de s’enclencher, est à suivre de près car il pourrait être source de déséquilibres, dont davantage d’inflation.

Il y a une référence historique à peut-être proposer : les années qui ont suivi la fin de la deuxième guerre mondiale, avec à la fois un besoin de soutenir l’économie et de résorber le déséquilibre entre une demande civile qui se réveille et une offre alors très militaire. Le tout forçant à des évolutions structurelles et sectorielles. Mais attention ; si une certaine résonnance au niveau des enchainements existe, l’enjeu de la maîtrise du temps est perçu différemment. Il fallait aller très vite il y a 75 ans ; beaucoup croient, à tort ou à raison, que la contrainte de calendrier est moins exigeante aujourd’hui. A ce titre, ni les initiatives de politique économique, ni les changements structurels ne seraient d’une ampleur et d’une vitesse telles qu’ils seraient générateurs de graves déséquilibres, dont davantage d’inflation.


Lire la première édition de Accuracy Talks Straight >

Accuracy Talks Straight #2 – Point de vue

Édito

Nicolas Barsalou
Associé, Accuracy

LA CRISE ET CE QUI S’ENSUIVIT*

La crise que nous traversons depuis bientôt un an et demi n’a pas d’équivalent dans l’histoire moderne. Ce n’est ni une crise cyclique classique, ni même une réplique de la grande crise financière de 2008. Il serait donc dangereux de penser que nous en sortirons de la même manière que les crises précédentes.

Que constatons-nous ? Deux mots permettent d’approfondir l’analyse.

Le premier est « contraste ». Ce n’est certes pas la première fois qu’une crise économique affecte plus sévèrement certaines zones géographiques, et notamment dans le cas présent l’Europe plus que l’Extrême-Orient. En revanche, c’est la première fois que nous observons une telle diversité en matière d’impact sur les différents secteurs économiques. Ainsi certains secteurs sinistrés mettront au mieux plusieurs années à retrouver la situation de 2019, comme le transport aérien ou le tourisme. A contrario, d’autres secteurs ont tiré parti de la crise, comme les activités en ligne (e-commerce, vidéo, jeux) ou ont pu servir de valeur refuge, comme le luxe.

Le deuxième mot est sans doute « incertitude ». Compte tenu d’un contexte géopolitique tendu et des injections sans précédent de capitaux dans l’économie, l’embellie actuelle pourrait déboucher à relativement court terme sur une autre crise de nature plus classique, d’autant plus sérieuse que toutes les plaies récentes n’auront pas cicatrisé.

En tant que conseils de nombreux acteurs de la vie économique partout dans le monde, nous observons une dé-corrélation inédite entre certaines situations de marché et l’état général de l’économie. D’une part, le marché des fusions-acquisitions, dopé par une abondance sans précédent de liquidités, a rarement sinon jamais connu une telle exubérance en volume comme en prix, et ce bien avant la sortie de crise. D’autre part, le marché des restructurations des entreprises est lui aussi et simultanément très actif, porté en particulier par les renégociations bancaires dans certains secteurs en difficulté. Ce paradoxe n’est qu’apparent : compte tenu des éléments rappelés ci-dessus il est possible et donc naturel d’observer ces deux tendances à la fois.

Dans ce contexte, il convient à notre avis plus que jamais pour tous les acteurs de la vie économique et financière d’éviter les comportements moutonniers et d’analyser chaque cas de manière individualisée et sur-mesure.

Le cas le plus intéressant est sans doute celui de secteurs qui sont traversés à la fois par ces deux courants positif et négatif. Le secteur de l’immobilier est particulièrement pertinent car il est traversé par des mutations profondes et durables, auxquelles s’ajoutent les effets de la dernière crise. Examinons à ce ti t re deux sous-secteurs représentatifs : l’immobilier commercial et l’immobilier de bureaux.

Le premier est affecté depuis longtemps maintenant par le développement for t et pérenne du e-commerce, phénomène qui s’est accéléré en 2020 sous l’effet du confinement et de la fermeture de nombreux centres commerciaux, à tel point que les valeurs des foncières commerciales étaient en fin d’année dernière à un plus bas historique. Notre conviction arrêtée depuis longtemps déjà est que cette baisse des valeurs était excessive et caractéristique de ces mouvements moutonniers déjà mentionnés et non adaptés à l’économie moderne : les centres bien placés, bien gérés et bien aménagés continueront à être des acteurs majeurs du commerce. Il est heureux que, depuis quelques semaines, certains commencent à s’en rendre compte et que les valeurs remontent.

Le deuxième bénéficiait jusqu’à la crise de 2020 d’une conjoncture favorable, en raison d’une inadaptation structurelle de l’offre à la demande et d’une situation de taux d’intérêt réels nuls qui tirait à la hausse les valeurs dites « refuges » comme l’immobilier.

De surcroît, la crise a eu jusqu’ici peu d’impact car, pour l’essentiel, les loyers ont continué à être payés et, compte tenu d’une politique monétaire extrêmement accommodante, les taux de capitalisation et donc les valeurs ont peu évolué. Or, ces deux paramètres sont aujourd’hui menacés. L’essor du télétravail, s’il s’avère pérenne et significatif (au-delà sans doute d’un ou deux jours par semaine), aura inévitablement des conséquences importantes sur la quantité de mètres carrés nécessaires, sur l’aménagement des locaux et sur leur emplacement. Tous ces impacts ne seront pas forcément négatifs : s’il est certain que les grands centres d’affaires comme La Défense ou Canary Wharf souffrent et vont souffrir, les quartiers centraux des affaires pourraient voir leurs valeurs et taux d’occupation continuer à croître.

Quant aux paramètres macro-économiques, et notamment l’inflation, seul un oracle pourrait prédire leur évolution : la seule chose à faire est de rester vigilant et de se donner les moyens d’être anti-fragile grâce à des stratégies privilégiant la flexibilité et l’agilité. À cet égard, il sera extrêmement pertinent de surveiller l’évolution du secteur bancaire, mais ceci sera l’objet d’une autre chronique…

* « LES MYRTES ONT DES FLEURS QUI PARLENT DES ÉTOILES ET C’EST DE MES DOULEURS QU’EST FAIT LE JOUR QUI VIENT PLUS PROFONDE EST LA MER ET PLUS BLANCHE EST LA VOILE ET PLUS LE MAL AMER PLUS MERVEILLEUX LE BIEN »

LOUIS ARAGON
« LA GUERRE ET CE QUI S’ENSUIVIT » (LE ROMAN INACHEVÉ)

< Retourner sur Accuracy Talks Straight

Legal Plus – Challenges of digital evidence in formal proceedings

On 30th June, our partner Darren Mullins and senior advisor Paul Wright spoke about different challenges of digital evidence in ‘Formal proceedings’ at “Dubai & Middle East: 7th annual international arbitration virtual summit”. You can watch their full presentation below.

Accuracy advises House of HR

Accuracy provided financial due diligence support to House of HR on the acquisition of Cohedron, a leading group of full-service companies in the public sector. The takeover enables House of HR to strengthen their position on the Dutch market and in the public service sector.

Economic brief: what the figures tell us (#5)

In this edition of the Economic Brief, we will examine some of the factors behind the increase in corporate leverage. We look at how corporate debt can amplify the effects of a financial shock and go on to investigate what the price may be for the current high levels of debt.

Comment évaluer le prix d’un club de football professionnel ? – Source Ecofoot – 25/05/2021

Les mouvements n’interviendront pas que sur les bancs de touche lors des prochains mois. En plus d’une salve de changements d’entraineurs, plusieurs clubs phares du football professionnel français devraient enregistrer prochainement d’importants changements actionnariaux, à l’image des Girondins de Bordeaux ou encore de l’AS Saint-Etienne. Comment les candidats porteurs d’un projet de reprise définissent-ils le montant de leur offre ? Les méthodes classiques de l’ingénierie financière s’appliquent-elles au football professionnel ? Henri Philippe, Partner chez Accuracy, société de conseil aux dirigeants d’entreprise, et co-auteur de Créer de la valeur dans le football, nous livre ses analyses sur les méthodes les plus efficaces pour estimer la valeur d’un club de football professionnel. Entretien.

Certains analystes financiers estiment que la méthode des DCF (Discounted Cash Flows) n’est pas pertinente pour procéder à l’évaluation d’un club de football professionnel pour plusieurs raisons (flux de trésorerie négatifs de façon récurrente pour certains clubs, spécificités liées à l’évaluation de la valeur de marché des joueurs, méthode des DCF davantage adaptée aux entreprises en forte croissance…). Quelle est votre position à ce sujet ?

Les mêmes débats animaient les discussions à l’aube des années 2000 au sujet des entreprises de la « Nouvelle Economie ». On entendait alors régulièrement que les méthodes classiques de la finance ne pouvaient s’appliquer aux acteurs du web en raison d’un fonctionnement différent. Le même débat a été ouvert plus récemment concernant le secteur des cryptomonnaies et plus globalement de la blockchain. Et les mêmes arguments sont utilisés : les actifs de telles sociétés sont différents par nature et il est impossible de les évaluer via les méthodes financières classiques. Des arguments qui sont également utilisés dans l’industrie footballistique. N’entend-on pas régulièrement qu’un club de football n’est pas une entreprise comme une autre ?

Pourtant, les règles en matière d’estimation sont immuables : un actif vaut ce qu’il rapportera dans le futur. Cela fait un siècle que cette théorie existe et, jusqu’à présent, nous n’avons pas trouvé une meilleure méthode pour procéder à l’estimation d’une entreprise. Cette règle vaut pour un appartement, une marque, une usine… Si on souhaite appliquer une autre méthode pour évaluer un actif, on sort alors de la théorie financière !

N’existe-t-il pas tout de même des spécificités propres au monde du football rendant l’application de la méthode des DCF complexe ?

Imaginons trois cercles concentriques pour illustrer l’exercice consistant à évaluer une entreprise. Pour les entreprises dites classiques, le premier cercle est le plus important. Il réunit les cash-flows directement générés par les activités de l’entreprise étudiée. L’essentiel de la valeur se situe à ce premier niveau. Le deuxième cercle représente les synergies actionnariales qui peuvent être mises en place avec les autres entités du groupe. Par exemple, un grand groupe de luxe peut trouver un intérêt à investir dans un groupe de presse pour créer des synergies (ndlr : stratégie LVMH). Normalement, ce deuxième cercle représente une valeur marginale. Enfin, le dernier cercle représente les enjeux d’image. Typiquement, un capitaine d’industrie peut se faire plaisir en acquérant un prestigieux domaine viticole bordelais ou une maison d’art moderne. Cette acquisition répond alors à des motivations hédonistes ou de communication. On surnomme familièrement un tel actif la « danseuse » du président.

https://www.ecofoot.fr/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cercles-concentriques.jpg

Traditionnellement, dans le football professionnel, les investisseurs s’intéressaient peu au premier cercle. Car les clubs n’étaient généralement pas rentables. En revanche, les synergies actionnariales étaient très courantes ! Un patron de club français a notamment utilisé son exposition médiatique pour développer les activités de sa société commercialisant des solutions de comptabilité/gestion (ndlr : Jean-Michel Aulas – Cegid). De même, un autre patron de club a utilisé ses relations nouées dans le football – notamment avec les collectivités – pour développer ses activités dans l’univers de la propreté et du recyclage des déchets (ndlr : famille Nicollin). Le deuxième cercle a longtemps représenté beaucoup de valeur pour les propriétaires de club.

Enfin, le cercle trois a toujours revêtu un enjeu important pour les patrons de club. Mais il a quelque peu évolué dans sa forme ces dernières années. En France, nous avons l’exemple de l’entrepreneur qui a fait fortune et qui a eu envie de rendre à sa région natale ce qu’elle lui a apporté en acquérant le club phare du territoire (ndlr : famille Pinault – Stade Rennais FC). Plus récemment, un petit Etat faisant face à l’hostilité galopante de ses voisins, a décidé de se lancer dans le sport et les médias pour acquérir une légitimité au niveau international (ndlr : Qatar – PSG). Ces investissements ne répondent pas à une logique financière pure et dure. Si ces stratégies génèrent intrinsèquement de la valeur, il est cependant complexe d’estimer de tels clubs via la méthode des DCF.

Existe-t-il une évolution dans le football européen ? Les nouveaux investisseurs s’intéressant au football professionnel cherchent-ils à obtenir un certain niveau de rentabilité en rationalisant le fonctionnement des clubs ?

Oui, en effet, le secteur a considérablement évolué ces dernières années. Les clubs se sont professionnalisés dans leur fonctionnement financier grâce à une nouvelle génération de dirigeants. Il y a 30 ans, les écoles ou masters spécialisés en Management du Sport n’existaient pas ! Aujourd’hui, de telles formations fleurissent dans la plupart des écoles de commerce. Le secteur a gagné en maturité grâce à cette nouvelle catégorie de managers.

Par ailleurs, nous avons assisté ces dernières années à une financiarisation de l’économie. Une financiarisation qui a gagné quasiment tous les secteurs d’activité. Aujourd’hui, il y a énormément de liquidités en circulation en raison des politiques monétaires accommodantes menées par les banques centrales. Et, en parallèle, les opportunités d’investissement sont peu nombreuses. Les actifs immobiliers et boursiers sont déjà à un niveau très élevé ; ils n’offrent pas forcément de perspectives de très hauts rendements. Les investisseurs cherchent donc des solutions alternatives et le sport constitue clairement une cible.

Ainsi, au cours des dernières années, de nouveaux types d’investisseurs sont entrés dans le monde du football à l’image des fonds d’investissement. Ils perçoivent dans le football une opportunité d’obtenir de bons rendements à condition d’en assumer les risques. Le club de football est alors clairement considéré comme un actif financier. Le premier cercle, évoqué à la question précédente, regagne en importance.

Pour un fonds de capital-risque, habitué à gérer des portefeuilles de plusieurs milliards d’euros d’actifs, un club de football ne représente pas un investissement très important. Les sommes en jeu ne sont pas très élevés. Par exemple, en Ligue 1, un club enregistre un chiffre d’affaires moyen de l’ordre de 100 M€ par saison – et encore ce chiffre est considérablement tiré vers le haut par quelques locomotives à l’image du Paris Saint-Germain. A titre de comparaison, les plus gros hypermarchés en France réalisent un CA de… 300 M€ par an ! Racheter un club de football ne constitue pas une très grosse prise de risque pour un fonds d’investissement. Le jeu en vaut la chandelle.

La méthode des multiples est également difficilement applicable dans le football professionnel car peu de clubs sont cotés en bourse et les transactions sont relativement rares sur ce marché. Faut-il pour autant totalement écarter une telle méthode pour procéder à l’évaluation d’un club ? Sur quel indicateur faut-il faire porter la méthode des multiples (chiffre d’affaires, résultat d’exploitation, EBE, résultat net) ?

La méthode des DCF donne la photographie de la manière dont un patron gère sa boutique. La méthode des multiples renvoie plutôt la vision du marché. Elle permet de déterminer à l’instant t le prix d’un actif en fonction des données du secteur.

La méthode des multiples est donc applicable à l’industrie footballistique. Elle est même intéressante car elle permet d’intégrer les cercles deux et trois à l’évaluation. En revanche, elle est utilisable sur des indicateurs peu fiables. Idéalement, la méthode des multiples doit être appliquée à un résultat. Or c’est très difficile d’employer une telle méthodologie dans le football car le résultat d’un club est souvent proche de zéro voire négatif, pour de bonnes et de mauvaises raisons. Par ailleurs, en raison de la volatilité des plus-values enregistrées sur le marché des transferts, il est difficile de définir un résultat normatif pour un club de football. La méthode des multiples est parfaite pour une entreprise mature qui génère des cash-flows de façon régulière. Toutefois, il est possible d’appliquer cette méthode des multiples sur le chiffre d’affaires dans le cadre de l’évaluation d’un club de football.

Comment calcule-t-on le coefficient multiplicateur ? Existe-t-il des règles précises pour le définir ?

Il y a en effet des règles à respecter. Cette méthode ne s’inscrit pas dans une logique « one size fits all ». Ce n’est d’ailleurs pas intéressant de se référer aux clubs cotés en bourse pour appliquer cette méthode. Relativement peu de clubs sont encore listés sur les marchés et les titres ne sont pas liquides : ils sont souvent détenus par des supporters.

En revanche, s’appuyer sur les transactions pour évaluer un club de football via la méthode des multiples, cela fonctionne bien. Et cela donne même souvent des résultats probants. A condition d’être rigoureux dans sa méthodologie. Dans l’idéal, il est nécessaire de comparer des clubs similaires en matière de résultats sportifs, de structure d’actifs, de potentiel de développement… Le modèle d’exploitation d’un stade change grandement la donne par exemple.

[…]

Le média américain Sportico a dernièrement publié l’édition 2021 de son estimation des différents clubs de Premier League. Pour mener à bien cet exercice, Kurt Badenhausen, journaliste ayant conduit l’étude, s’est appuyé sur la méthode des multiples appliquée au chiffre d’affaires. Pour calculer au mieux le coefficient multiplicateur pour chaque club, des entretiens ont été menés avec 7 experts des transactions financières dans le milieu footballistique.

Autre méthode classiquement utilisé par les financiers pour procéder à l’évaluation d’une entreprise : l’actif net réévalué (ANR). Est-elle applicable pour un club de football professionnel ?

La méthode de l’actif net réévalué consiste à étudier l’ensemble des actifs et passifs d’un bilan comptable afin d’estimer leur juste valeur. Concernant un club de football professionnel, la réévaluation va essentiellement porter sur le portefeuille de joueurs, le stade, la valeur de marque et le centre de formation.

Paradoxalement, le portefeuille de joueurs est la classe d’actifs la plus « simple » à réévaluer. Il existe aujourd’hui de nombreuses bases de données dans le secteur qui font référence en matière d’évaluation du prix de transfert d’un joueur professionnel. De plus, les techniques d’évaluation vont continuer d’évoluer et donc de se perfectionner grâce à l’essor de la data. Il sera donc possible de construire des modélisations de plus en plus pointues.

Concernant les actifs immobiliers, les logiques sont différentes par rapport aux activités traditionnelles d’une organisation sportive. Devenir propriétaire de son stade, c’est un changement structurant pour un club de football. Cela chamboule son organisation. Il n’est plus seulement un club de football, il devient également un véritable « opérateur de spectacles ». Avec des risques qui diffèrent de ceux d’un club de sport. Aujourd’hui, on peut considérer qu’une entité comme OL Groupe a également développé un véritable activité de promotion immobilière en parallèle de ses activités sportives. Et le club n’a pas encore achevé sa transformation puisqu’il projette de bâtir une nouvelle arena de 15 000 places à Décines d’ici fin 2023.

La marque est également un actif relativement facile à évaluer pour les financiers. Il existe des méthodes classiques permettant de réaliser une première estimation à partir de contrats de redevance et sponsoring conclus. Il y a toutefois des évolutions à bien prendre en compte dont l’importance accrue des réseaux sociaux permettant de démultiplier le rayonnement d’une marque. Et c’est d’autant plus vrai dans l’univers du sport.

L’actif le plus difficile à réévaluer est sans doute le centre de formation. Il s’agit à la fois d’un actif immobilier et d’un centre de profits via le trading de joueurs. Le financier devra alors calculer au mieux la capacité du club à générer des plus-values récurrentes à long terme via les joueurs formés au club. C’est un exercice délicat à réaliser car les prévisions ne sont pas simples à réaliser. Certains clubs excellent dans la formation en tirant très régulièrement d’importantes plus-values via la vente de joueurs formés dans leur centre. En revanche, d’autres clubs enregistrent des déficits récurrents dans ce domaine. Il ne suffit pas d’investir quelques millions d’euros par saison dans son centre de formation pour générer des cash-flows positifs lors de chaque exercice. La formation est devenue un secteur extrêmement concurrentiel. Les clubs se livrent d’intenses batailles pour attirer les meilleurs jeunes mais aussi pour conserver les éducateurs et recruteurs qui réalisent un bon travail. Il est également nécessaire de maîtriser de nombreuses complexités juridiques pour bien appréhender ce marché. C’est loin d’être évident de réussir dans le domaine de la formation.

[…]

Quelle démarche devrait entreprendre un investisseur potentiellement intéressé par la reprise du FC Girondins de Bordeaux ? Doit-il faire trainer le dossier pour favoriser une renégociation de la dette du club ?

Un investisseur intéressé par le dossier des Girondins de Bordeaux n’a pas intérêt à ce que le dossier s’enlise jusqu’à une liquidation judiciaire. Liquider une entreprise, cela abime considérablement la valeur de ses actifs car ces derniers sont alors vendus à la découpe. En revanche, dans le cadre d’une procédure de redressement judiciaire, le tribunal de commerce organise un plan de redressement en négociant avec les actionnaires et les créanciers. En France, le principe du droit des faillites est de préserver au maximum les intérêts de l’entreprise. Parfois au détriment des actionnaires ou des créanciers.

Le club des Girondins de Bordeaux, c’est une très belle marque à acquérir ! La ville de Bordeaux jouit d’un très fort rayonnement à l’international grâce notamment à ses vignobles. Après Paris, c’est sans doute l’une des villes françaises les plus connues à l’international. Par ailleurs, le club des Girondins est une place forte du football français. Avec de très nombreuses stars ayant évolué sous ses couleurs, dont notamment Zinedine Zidane ! Certes, il y a tout un projet à reconstruire mais ce club a un vrai potentiel de développement. Et il a d’ailleurs déjà attiré l’attention de plusieurs investisseurs qui préparent un projet de reprise.

La question de la dette que vous soulevez est intéressante. La reprise du club passera forcément par une renégociation de la dette du FC Girondins de Bordeaux. On peut imaginer un rééchelonnement voire un abandon d’une partie des créances. On peut également imaginer une reprise d’une partie de la dette par d’autres acteurs : certains fonds sont spécialisés dans le rachat de high yield bonds. Les financiers sont des pragmatiques : ils préfèrent récupérer une partie de leur mise plutôt que de tout perdre. Après, c’est un jeu de négociation.


Source Ecofoot – 25/05/2021

Economic brief: what the figures tell us (#4)

In this month’s Economic Brief, we delve into changes in mobility and economic confidence. We look at how different countries are opening up at different rates and analyse confidence in both the services sector and the manufacturing sector. Finally, we look into recent comments comparing the economic situation in the 2020s with the 1920s to discover if there is some truth to them.

Accuracy advises NewPort Capital

Accuracy assisted NewPort Capital with its investment in Amslod, a a fast-growing and leading direct-to-consumer Dutch e-bike brand. The investment of NewPort Capital will enable Amslod to accelerate its growth strategy and strengthen its position in the Dutch and European E-bike sector.

Economic brief: what the figures tell us (#3)

This month in the Economic Brief, we look a little more closely at the impact of the pandemic in the developed world. We examine the different rates of vaccination in the West and consider how economic confidence has been affected. We go on to consider the impact of the crisis on debt servicing for companies before touching briefly on inflation.

Accuracy dans la presse – Source : Option Finance, 29/03/2021 – “ En France, les modèles bancaires ultra-dominants et ultra-diversifiés ont bien résisté en 2020 ”

Interview Nicolas Darbo, associé chez Accuracy

Même si les banques françaises ont publié récemment des résultats 2020 en baisse, elles ont, jusqu’à présent du moins, assez bien surmonté la crise sanitaire. Quels enseignements en tirez-vous ?

Ces résultats sont avant tout corrélés au positionnement des banques en termes de métiers, car ces derniers ont été impactés de façon très différente par la crise. Certains ont très bien résisté comme les activités de taux au sein de la banque de financement et d’investissement (BFI), portées notamment par une forte activité sur le marché obligataire, ou la banque privée, les hauts revenus ayant été moins touchés.

D’autres métiers ont en revanche davantage souffert. La banque de détail a doublement pâti de la hausse massive de l’épargne, et notamment des dépôts à vue, qui a, d’une part, entraîné une baisse des découverts, l’un des produits les plus rentables en France, et, d’autre part, affecté la marge nette d’intérêts de par le replacement à taux négatif à la BCE. Dans les activités de marchés, le métier actions a beaucoup souffert. Des produits dérivés comme les options sont en effet construits en tenant compte des versements de dividendes, et comme ces derniers n’ont pas eu lieu l’année dernière, ces produits ont entraîné de lourdes pertes chez tous les acteurs. De son côté, l’asset management a également souffert de la baisse des marchés boursiers qui, en pesant sur les encours, a eu un impact négatif sur les revenus.

Dans ce contexte, un modèle bancaire se distingue-t-il particulièrement ?

En fait, si l’on se focalise sur les revenus, deux modèles ont bien résisté en France l’année dernière, bien qu’ils soient très différents: d’une part, celui de BNP Paribas, qui a choisi, depuis longtemps, d’être une banque très diversifiée, en termes d’implantations géographiques comme de métiers (bien répartis entre la banque de détail, la BFI et les services financiers); d’autre part, celui du Crédit Agricole, moins diversifié, mais bien positionné sur le crédit à la consommation, l’asset management (avec Amundi), et surtout dans la banque de détail, avec une part de marché de 25 % en France. Il y a donc eu une prime aux modèles ultra-dominants et ultra-diversifiés.

La position très dominante (plus de deux tiers du marché) des trois mutualistes sur la banque de détail leur a d’ailleurs permis de ne pas être trop affectés par la crise. Chez BPCE, les réseaux ont réalisé une très bonne performance, mais deux autres métiers du groupe ont rencontré des difficultés, l’asset management avec H2O et le métier actions dans la BFI.

Enfin, Société Générale, moins diversifiée que BNP Paribas, de par notamment les cessions réalisées depuis une décennie, et moins dominante que les mutualistes sur la banque de détail, a fini en pertes, à-258 millions, touchée par la crise sur l’un de ses métiers phares, les actions.

Le montant des provisions a augmenté dans les comptes bancaires pour 2020. Le risque a-t-il été bien évalué ?

Au sein des banques françaises, le coût du risqu